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  • Beginning TIG welder...need some guidance.

    Howdy Gang:

    Got the new Diversion 180 set up and running today. This is my first TIG machine but I've been MIG welding for years. I think I'm going to like it once I get the hang of it. Tell me what I'm doing wrong if you would:

    1) The poor tungsten. Looks like a well worn 6011 rod when I'm done with it. I ground a nice sharp point on it, leaning into the brand new grinding wheel in a vertical fashion as suggested and not at a 90 degree angle. The first couple of times I stuck it to the work...re-grind and start over. Now that I'm able to keep it off the work I notice the arc dances around the point and my nice sharp point winds up looking like a charred hot dog. The point is gone and what remains is mostly a ball but black and charred. It's a 3/32 grey band Miller tungsten and the gas pressure is set at 15 CFH since I'm welding inside. Brand new bottle of argon. Any clues?

    2) When welding, do I strike the arc and "push" it toward the crack leaving the molten puddle behind the advancing tungsten tip? From what I gather reading and watching Youtube vids, the torch is leaned back a few degrees and the arc pushed forward along the joint instead of welded "behind" and advancing tip.

    3) Filler material. Welding two pieces of 1/8" inch material together, oddly enough once I got the hang of it I got a nice puddle going and dimed out along the joint. The end result was a descent bead that was below the surface level of the two pieces of material but it looked much better without using filler rod than it did with filler rod. Is filler rod necessary to completely fill the joint or is it just as strong without rod as long as the puddles are melted together?

    4) When adding filler rod do I add it ahead of the advancing arc or can it be added in from the side at a 90 degree angle?

    Thanks in advance for helping me get started!

    Ron

  • #2
    It sounds like you're dipping. Find a way to prop to steady your hand. With practice hold an arc as long as your tungsten is thick. For now a bit longer arc will serve you well. I had good results with a 180 and a gas lens. Stick out twice the diameter of your tungsten, hold as near perpendicular to the weld bead as you can and still see it. Keep the filler rod in line with the intended weld bead, and 90 degrees to the tungsten. Focus the arc at the leading edge of the puddle, moving back ever so slightly to avoid touching the tungsten with rod. The hot end of filler rod must stay in the plume of shielding gas when not being dipped. You'll consume a lot of electricity, gas, and metal before you can weld frustration free. Be patient.
    Go to the weldmonger store, get two TIG Fingers, it'll make a big difference how often you dip. When you do dip, snap off the tungsten a bit and regrind on a dedicated stone.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Willie B View Post
      It sounds like you're dipping. Find a way to prop to steady your hand. With practice hold an arc as long as your tungsten is thick. For now a bit longer arc will serve you well. I had good results with a 180 and a gas lens. Stick out twice the diameter of your tungsten, hold as near perpendicular to the weld bead as you can and still see it. Keep the filler rod in line with the intended weld bead, and 90 degrees to the tungsten. Focus the arc at the leading edge of the puddle, moving back ever so slightly to avoid touching the tungsten with rod. The hot end of filler rod must stay in the plume of shielding gas when not being dipped. You'll consume a lot of electricity, gas, and metal before you can weld frustration free. Be patient.
      Go to the weldmonger store, get two TIG Fingers, it'll make a big difference how often you dip. When you do dip, snap off the tungsten a bit and regrind on a dedicated stone.
      +1 on that

      Here is some TIG stuff that you may also find useful.

      TIG Guidelines

      http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/gtawbook.pdf


      Ten Common TIG Problems: A Visual Guide

      http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...-guide-graphic


      The following chart addresses some of the common problems of TIG welding

      http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...eshooting.html


      Diamond Ground Tungsten Guidebook

      http://www.diamondground.com/TungstenGuidebook2013.pdf
      .

      *******************************************
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      • #4
        You did not mention what type of metal you are welding..

        But...

        In case you have not found these yet...
        you might find these videos helpful on aluminum TIG..

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FadO0hqTaN0

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ay_oYg0LUo

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTZfDndPkl0

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpxzVq6YsoM

        much of the torch technique is applicable to steel as well...
        although machine settings will be different (DCEN rather than ACHF for Aluminum)
        Last edited by H80N; 04-24-2014, 10:26 AM.
        .

        *******************************************
        The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

        “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

        Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

        My Blue Stuff:
        Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
        Dynasty 200DX
        Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
        Millermatic 200

        TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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        • #5
          Sweet, thanks for the suggestions. Be back shortly with results.

          Comment


          • #6
            I hope by now you have discovered lanthanated 1.5% or 2.0%. It's what the Weldmonger and I use with inverter machines. Chuck that ceriated stuff... that's what came with my 165, but after trying all of the different combos available, I found that the lanthanated held a tip far better than the others.

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            • #7
              Be sure and use 2% tungsten and i always use the highest gas flow my reg will put out. Also make sure u r running dc negative. Sounds like u r running dc positive aince the tungsten is doing that.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by southlandrunner View Post
                i always use the highest gas flow my reg will put out..

                NOT CORRECT...

                too high an argon flowrate is as bad as too low...

                an excessively high gas flow will cause turbulence and pull in air to the weld gas envelope
                .

                *******************************************
                The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                My Blue Stuff:
                Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                Dynasty 200DX
                Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                Millermatic 200

                TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by H80N View Post
                  NOT CORRECT...

                  too high an argon flowrate is as bad as too low...

                  an excessively high gas flow will cause turbulence and pull in air to the weld gas envelope
                  That is true! Dint think bout that but i think 40 wld b fine. Also depends on the lense. There r so many variables its hard to answer without watching.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by southlandrunner View Post
                    That is true! Dint think bout that but i think 40 wld b fine. Also depends on the lense. There r so many variables its hard to answer without watching.

                    Typical Argon flowrate is somewhere in the neighborhood of 13-20 Cubic Feet per Hour... depending on cup...

                    Where the heck did you get 40..?? way too high for normal Argon...
                    Last edited by H80N; 06-18-2014, 07:40 AM.
                    .

                    *******************************************
                    The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                    “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                    Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                    My Blue Stuff:
                    Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                    Dynasty 200DX
                    Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                    Millermatic 200

                    TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by southlandrunner View Post
                      Be sure and use 2% tungsten and i always use the highest gas flow my reg will put out. Also make sure u r running dc negative. Sounds like u r running dc positive aince the tungsten is doing that.
                      Correct on the polarity if he's welding steel, completely wrong on the gas flow no matter what he's welding.
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                      • #12
                        ld Skool
                        Originally Posted by southlandrunner
                        Be sure and use 2% tungsten and i always use the highest gas flow my reg will put out. Also make sure u r running dc negative. Sounds like u r running dc positive aince the tungsten is doing that.


                        Correct on the polarity if he's welding steel, completely wrong on the gas flow no matter what he's welding.

                        Perhaps we should not be so quick to judge on the gas flow, since we really have no info on what type of regulator is in use. Maybe... his regulator only puts out 15 cfh.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Goodhand View Post
                          Perhaps we should not be so quick to judge on the gas flow, since we really have no info on what type of regulator is in use. Maybe... his regulator only puts out 15 cfh.
                          Bad advice is bad advice....40 CFH Argon..?? that was just plain wrong...

                          we do a great disservice to the beginner when we let that type of misinformation slide...
                          Last edited by H80N; 06-20-2014, 11:59 AM.
                          .

                          *******************************************
                          The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                          “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                          Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                          My Blue Stuff:
                          Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                          Dynasty 200DX
                          Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                          Millermatic 200

                          TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com
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                            • #15
                              I too have recently begun tig welding. I scoured the web for a lot of resources and half of the time forget to bookmark those pages. I came across a kickbutt mobile app that basically has everything in it devoted to tig welding. The app name is iTig and I believe it only works on the ipad/iphone.

                              Hope this helps!

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