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Beginning TIG welder...need some guidance.

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  • #16
    Hi Ronnielyons

    It is nice your consultation in the Forum.

    People will give you a lot of good advise.

    regards

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    • #17
      Hey Ron, lot of good advice here. I'll add this. I downloaded the app for iphone iTig. Helped me out a lot. Comes with a calculator. Just select your material, thickness and joint type and it tells you what to set your machine at. Get's you really close. Has a lot more too but that's what I mainly use it for.

      https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/itig/id797132687?mt=8

      Hope this helps you out some.

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      • #18
        Beginning TIG welder...need some guidance.

        As a firefighter/gtaw welder, when you use high levels (over 20cfh) you are simply creating whats called a "venturi" effect. Ie: a force through confined space (cup), creating suction, introducing (O2).

        Your cfh is so rapid that it causes a sucking effect from static/ambient O2 source into ur welds due to vacum/ venturi effect.

        Also keep in mind what it is your welding. I do heat exchangers for a living. Tight pipe saddle joints which will only intensify turbulence. Think of it as concentrated air movement between sky scrapers. Believe its called "Stack Effect". My uneducated peers (absolute fools), think its best to jack up amps, wack out the CFH, to get it done. Their welds look like burnt, smeared, dog poop, to be honest! Go back to school!!

        Trueth is, 20cfh, and 1 amp per thousandth base material, and torch angle is all it takes, return to basics.

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        • #19
          proof in pudding

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          • #20
            Beginning TIG welder...need some guidance.

            Argons air density is much heavier then ambient air, there for it will only descend. Treat it as such, in a calm manner and hold shielding coverage. I work with titanium and zirconium, even though I weld in sterile white gloves, I never exceed 20cfh. I simply extent the post flow rate, 5-15 seconds longer.

            The name "argon" is derived from the Greek word αργον, neuter singular form of αργος meaning "lazy" or "inactive", as a reference to the fact that the element undergoes almost no chemical react

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            • #21
              Originally posted by GG47 View Post

              As a firefighter/gtaw welder, when you use high levels (over 20cfh) you are simply creating whats called a "venturi" effect. Ie: a force through confined space (cup), creating suction, introducing (O2).

              Your cfh is so rapid that it causes a sucking effect from static/ambient O2 source into ur welds due to vacum/ venturi effect.

              Also keep in mind what it is your welding. I do heat exchangers for a living. Tight pipe saddle joints which will only intensify turbulence. Think of it as concentrated air movement between sky scrapers. Believe its called "Stack Effect". My uneducated peers (absolute fools), think its best to jack up amps, wack out the CFH, to get it done. Their welds look like burnt, smeared, dog poop, to be honest! Go back to school!!

              Trueth is, 20cfh, and 1 amp per thousandth base material, and torch angle is all it takes, return to basics. 12-29-2014, 11:56 PM
              20xaerf



              Argons air density is much heavier then ambient air, there for it will only descend. Treat it as such, in a calm manner and hold shielding coverage. I work with titanium and zirconium, even though I weld in sterile white gloves, I never exceed 20cfh. I simply extent the post flow rate, 5-15 seconds longer.
              Good advice... well put...
              .

              *******************************************
              The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

              “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

              Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

              My Blue Stuff:
              Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
              Dynasty 200DX
              Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
              Millermatic 200

              TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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              • #22
                Here is a very good old thread on Argon gas flow settings...

                http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...n-flow-setting
                .

                *******************************************
                The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                My Blue Stuff:
                Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                Dynasty 200DX
                Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                Millermatic 200

                TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                Comment

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