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Why buy it for $1 when I can make it myself for $100.

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  • #46
    A friend recently retired from his job at General Electric where wind turbine generators were produced.

    Wanted to send him a retirement gift and as usual, decided to follow the do it yourself path.

    Found some titanium turbine blades on ebay as a start and used some scrap pieces to make a few small models.

    They spin but don't generate electricity.

    Ended up making 8 from the pile of titanium parts I had around.

    Now all I need to do is make up a funny card to include with the surprise.
    Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

    Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

    Comment


    • #47
      Additional photos of titanium wind turbine model
      Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

      Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

      Comment


      • #48
        Having a few beers in the shop with the usual suspects led to a discussion of loose change and how to redeem
        it.
        All of them mentioned they had been collecting their spare change for a while and wanted to use it for holiday
        shopping.

        The local banks have removed the coin counting machines as they were found to be inaccurate and were
        shortchanging customers.
        Now the banks want all coins wrapped in order to be accepted.

        So I offered to look into a coin wrapping machine.

        Ouch - price for a machine was well out of our budget.
        But I found that the rolling heads were about $20 each.

        Mentioned this to them and they said, " we'll buy the heads if you can figure a cheaper way".

        ok - here we go again.

        Came up with this poor man's approach which worked better than I thought.

        Used a holesaw to grip the rolling heads and welded on a shaft to fit my battery drill,

        It turned out my pals have about two 5 galon plastic water cooler jugs of change they need wrapped.

        So it looks like we will have a Super Bowl party where they watch the game and I get to wrap their coins.
        Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

        Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

        Comment


        • #49
          Build ya a little tool holder and chuck that sucker up in the lathe.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
            Build ya a little tool holder and chuck that sucker up in the lathe.
            ryanjones2150,

            I don't have a lathe which is probably best.
            Last time I used one was in high school wood shop.
            Dress code called for ties to be worn.
            I had mine tucked in my shirt but it got loose and got hooked on the table leg I was turning.
            Luckily for me I was running late that morning and grabbed a clip-on tie.
            Saved me from much pain that day but I still manage to be a Clouseau in the shop every now and then.
            Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

            Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

            Comment


            • #51
              Burnt,

              I gotta say, I think the stuff your making is awesome. Its cool to see that you get so into it for no other reason than you want to.

              Stuff is looking really good too, I am similar to you in wanting to make it myself but never this in depth.

              I also do fabrication and welding as part of my job so I don't get to choose so much but I think its some really cool stuff you are making here, I wanted to make a stainless coffee table but never got to it.

              Where do you keep getting titaium rods and 316 1/4" plate from? That stuff is not cheap, you only weld as a hobby?

              My buds used to tell me I had too much time on my hands, then they needed my help to fix something. Now I don't get that anymore
              if there's a welder, there's a way

              Comment


              • #52
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                Olivero,

                Thanks for the kind words.

                I got most of my stainless from my first job about 25 years ago.
                The company was getting 45 to 50 cents a pound from a local scrap dealer so
                I offered them 60 cents a pound and the boss agreed.
                Over the years the deal stuck even as scrap prices went up.
                Probably still have about 150 lbs of assorted drops and plate.

                My friends have kept me in mind when they come across scrap that may interest me.
                When they need a repair, I can usually find a suitable piece in my stainless scrap can.
                They often ask why I used stainless instead of carbon steel.
                I tell them,"Can't take it with me when I go and I hate sanding and painting metal".

                This is a small stainless steel table with wine bottle holders in each leg.
                Designed the holders to fit 750 ml and 1.5 liter wine bottles.

                Perhaps this will inspire you to build your coffee table.

                I started looking for titanium on ebay 12 years ago and got some good deals then but no longer.

                The big expense was buying titanium tig wire but I'm set for now.

                Here is a link to a previous post about a big titanium sculpture I made.

                http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...nium-sculpture

                Good luck and have fun welding.
                Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                Comment


                • #53
                  Nice table. What did you use to make the table top?

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Oldgrandad,

                    The top is made using round washers which were scrap due to the holes being wrong size.
                    1 3/4" in diameter with 5/16" holes and .090" thick.
                    Added a frame of 3/4" stainless angle for support.
                    Legs are 3/8" rod and bottle holders were 1/4" rod.
                    Total of 169 washers used for the top.
                    Was seeing spots for a while after all the tigging.
                    Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                    Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Stopped by my metal supplier to pick up some material for a project and found these stainless squares.

                      3" x 3" x 1/4" with a 1/2" wide slot milled diagonally.

                      Must be something I can make with these....................

                      Decided to make a cube and try out my assorted tig filler rods
                      By sheer coincidence I had 12 different alloys for the 12 seams of the cube.

                      Alloys are:
                      308L
                      309L
                      312
                      316
                      347
                      410
                      RN67 (Ni-30%, Cu-70%)
                      Hastelloy C22
                      Inconel 82
                      Inconel 92
                      ER90S-B9
                      2209

                      So here are a bunch of poor tig welds.
                      Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                      Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                      Comment


                      • #56
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                        Alum cube
                        Cut some 1/8" 6061 alum into 3" x 3" squares and made another cube.
                        Used 4043, 4943 and 5356 tig rods.
                        Parameters for my Dynasty 350:
                        75 amps (Advanced squarewave)
                        200 Hz
                        70% balance
                        3/32" 2% thorium tungsten
                        I'm not good enough to tell the difference in welding characteristics between the different alloys.
                        It was hard enough for me to keep the beads consistent.
                        Mine look like a squashed gummi worm.
                        Learned the importance of good joint fit-up for the next project.

                        More poor tig bead examples.
                        Attached Files
                        Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                        Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                        Comment


                        • #57
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                          While grinding some spices, I dropped my porcelain mortar and broke it.

                          Others have an electric spice grinder but I prefer to do mine by hand.

                          So after the usual cussing, I looked into a non-breakable solution.

                          ebay has several versions available at reasonable prices but as usual
                          I decided to make my own for much more money.

                          Ordered a 4 inch stainless hemisphere from King Metals and found some stainless pipe pieces.

                          Base for the mortar is a short length of 3" pipe.
                          Sent it to my local machine shop to bevel the inside for a better fit to the hemisphere.

                          Pestle is a length of 3/4" pipe with a stainless ball bearing welded to one end.
                          Plugged the other end to make it dishwasher safe.

                          After a bit of polishing to hide my poor welds, I was in business.
                          Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                          Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            A spice grinder worthy of a man's kitchen right there.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              A lifetime member of a local canoe club was honored for serving for many years,

                              Wanted to make a retirement gift and looked into a kayaking type of sculpture.
                              Wasn't easy finding something suitable, so decided to make one.

                              The paddler and paddle were easy but the kayak was a big challenge.

                              What I thought would be simple led to lots of cussing and scrap.
                              Compound curves are way beyond my skill set for sheet metal.

                              So I was stumped and anxious as I had finished the kayaker body but not a
                              kayak and the award dinner was looming.

                              By sheer dumb luck, I was salvaging a dishwasher for parts and
                              found it used 2 stainless steel spray arms inside.

                              So here is one of the awards I was able to make using the spray arm.

                              It was well received.


                              Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                              Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Hope these photos show up. Click image for larger version

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                                Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                                Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

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