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Why buy it for $1 when I can make it myself for $100.

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  • #31
    Winter project

    Spent a lot of time in the garage this past winter due to ice and potholes.

    Decided to rebuild the grill for the beer keg bbq as the old one was showing it's age (26 years) and was an embarrasment to me when I grilled for friends.
    (I think I made the original grill in about 1 hour as I was so anxious to try out the bbq.)

    "You made your bbq out of a stainless keg and yet with all this great Blue equipment, it looks like you hacked up a grill from K-Mart to fit."

    ok, ok, you guys win.......................!

    Had some short lengths of 7/32" diameter 6-4 titanium rods which looked like they might work.

    Traced the keg on a piece of plywood and bent a long piece to form a rim to fit inside.
    Lots of cutting and fitting to fill in the center.
    This time I spaced the rods closer so the hot dogs didn't fall thru as in the old design.

    They said, "we'll bring steaks instead of hot dogs to test it when you have the new grill done"

    It's good to have good friends.
    Attached Files
    Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

    Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

    Comment


    • #32
      Winter Project part 2

      More photos of the titanium grill project.

      Now it's just a wait for warmer weather
      Attached Files
      Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

      Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

      Comment


      • #33
        Your screw jack looks like a pedestal from a computer subfloor.

        Comment


        • #34
          Here is another goofy project from the "nerd with no life".

          I got these Sure Shot sprayers at a yard sale.
          They have a standard schrader tire valve for pressurizing them which is very clever.
          The ones I got are stainless steel but they are no longer manufactured.
          Sure Shot has switched to aluminum for the current production.
          Very useful as I can spray almost anything thru them and they came with spare O rings, nozzles and valves.
          Sure Shot also sells repair parts so I'm sure these will outlive me.

          I use one for bug spray and another for WD-40 to keep things moving.

          Only drawback is that the body is larger in diameter than a regular spray can and as I am using them for extended periods, my finger would get tired.

          Looked around and found after-market handles for regular spray cans such as this one by Krylon but they would not fit the Sure Shot sprayer.

          So here is my $100 version.

          All stainless steel and I can refill the tank without removing the handle.
          Attached Files
          Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

          Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

          Comment


          • #35
            Nice job on that - I have a couple of the older versions of the "A" model, holds a quart - be advised though - if you come across one of the larger ones and it's chrome, the older ones were chrome plated BRASS, and carried a warning NOT to use them with ammonia based chemicals -

            My other one is white painted steel, those were fine with ammonia stuff.

            http://www.sureshotsprayer.com/SteelSprayers.html

            Steve

            Comment


            • #36
              Hi BukitCase,

              I also have a model A sprayer but since it was used, I was never able to get it working properly.
              It would lose pressure gradually.

              If I tightened up the stuffing box nut so it would hold pressure, the valve trigger became too tight to work easily.
              Easier for a dummy like me to just swap out a valve and spray nozzle when they stop working.

              I did like the handle placement on the model A so I modeled my version on this design.

              Thanks for posting the link to Sure Shot.
              Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

              Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

              Comment


              • #37
                Do you have to worry about water getting in them when you pressurize the canister off of your air compressor?
                Thanks,
                Nick

                Comment


                • #38
                  Hi kiwi,

                  Never had a problem with water in my air lines as I use a separator filter and an automatic drain valve on the compressor.
                  I figure if the air works for my Hypertherm 1000, it's good enough for the sprayer.

                  The bug spray I use is water based. pyrethrum. I get the concentrate and dilute it down to 1/2 % to 1% which is very economical. Costs about 50 cents for a 16 oz fill.
                  We have been having a bit of problems with wet weather and mosquitoes so spraying helps to keep them away.

                  And WD-40 is supposed to displace water so it seems to be ok so far.
                  Much cheaper when I buy it by the gallon.
                  Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                  Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Here is a follow up to a previous post showing a kayak roller for my car roof.

                    With the heat wave, it was time to go paddling on a local lake to cool off.

                    Made the brackets to fit the VW factory cross bars as neither Yakima or Thule had a suitable option.
                    The brackets were hinges with a leaf thickness of 1/8".
                    Made 4 but only 2 are needed for the kayak.

                    They stay on the car all year as I had to dis-assemble the cross bars to slide them on.
                    The kayak saddles detach from the brackets to cut wind resistance when not in use.
                    Everything is stainless steel so they match the roller hardware.

                    Next add-on may be bicycle and ski/snowboard mounts.
                    Attached Files
                    Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                    Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Latest goofy project

                      The switch on my LMSW-52 spot welder was getting touchy and giving me
                      inconsistant welds so I decided to use a solid state relay to switch the 220 VAC primary.

                      Used an adapter from an obsolete phone to provide 6 volts DC
                      to operate the relay and put it all in a junction box.

                      Removed and bypassed the existing toggle switch on the welder
                      and used a micro switch to control the DC voltage to the relay.

                      Could have just switched one side of the 220 VAC like the original switch
                      but the relay I had was a dual pole type so I used both poles.

                      Looks a bit ugly as I needed to add a 2 conductor wire to the switch but it works well.

                      I still can rewire it to original condition if I need to so all is not lost.

                      Hopefully it will last longer than the original switch.
                      Attached Files
                      Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                      Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Click image for larger version

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ID:	562665 Looney project for October.

                        Found a use for these stainless steel wire racks I have.

                        They measure about 10 1/4" x 10 1/4" and wire spacing is 1/4".

                        Decided to make a rack to smoke beef jerky after seeing a commercial one at a local Cabelas.

                        The frame uses 3 racks and I added some hooks for a door.

                        It will hold 14 racks and the door keeps everything from spilling out.

                        The rack fits inside my smoker so I just have to keep the temperature low to make sure I dehydrate the jerky instead of cooking it.


                        Here is a link to a previous post I made showing some of the other projects using these racks.

                        http://forum.millerwelds.com/forum/w...-the-same-item
                        Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                        Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Addition to my jerky rack.

                          It worked ok but I had to use my smoker to provide the heat and temperature control was a bit tricky.

                          So after looking at commercial food dehydrators, I decided to make my own.
                          Essentially they are a box with an electric fan and a temp control to keep the inside around 130 to 150 degrees.

                          Since I had the stainless wire racks already, it was a matter of building a suitable box.
                          My neighbor tossed out a stainless bbq last fall so I had the material.
                          Lots of cutting, bending and fitting.
                          Used my modified LMSW-52 spot welder to hold everything together.
                          Please excuse the terrible sheet metal work.

                          Found the blower and heater assembly on ebay for $17.
                          It is a replacement part for an electric fireplace room heater with high and low settings which works out well.
                          In addition, it has a high temp safety which cuts power at 185 degrees.

                          Thought I would need a temperature controller but luckily the vent damper on the door
                          allows me to vary the temp inside between 100 and 150 degrees.

                          I can use this electric version inside while before I had to use the smoker outside.
                          Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                          Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Your friends might be right. But I really appreciate your hard work and the time you utilized on it. If you have a passion to do something good and unique, donít stop by any obstruction. Accomplish whatever you want to.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Hi cynthiamyra,

                              I have fun designing and building something silly much like Rube Goldberg's machines.

                              For every one of the projects shown here, I have at least 3 or 4 which were dismal failures.
                              But even the flops are a great learning experience and provide welding practice.



                              .
                              Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                              Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Had the accountant and plumbing friends over for a quick last minute bbq.
                                As I was burning food, my accountant mentioned that his wife recently attended a cooking class where the chef showed
                                how to cook a fish dish using a sous vide machine.

                                She came back from the class inspired and went out and spent over $400 for all the equipment.

                                So I looked into this and to me, it's just a fancy new term for the old "boil in bag"
                                meals available about 20 years ago.

                                The idea for this technique is to first vacuum seal the item in a bag, then slowly cook it at
                                a relatively low temperature in a water bath for an extended period compared to conventional methods.

                                From what I have read about this technique, the cooking temperature rarely goes above 185 degrees F.
                                In addition, temperature control is critical.

                                The commercial cookers I found all control the water temperature in the cooking tank to + or - 1 degree F
                                and have a pump or some means to circulate the water around your food.
                                One big claim is that it is hard to over-cook your food using this process.

                                Some examples (your mileage may vary)

                                Baby back ribs cook at 165 degrees F for 4 to 8 and up to 24 hours.
                                Tuna, salmon, sole cook at 126 degrees F or higher for 20 to 40 minutes.

                                I don't know how well this technique would work on chicken wings or pizza.

                                Sometimes, I think my "friends" start these conversations just to get me thinking.
                                "Hey, let's get the metal bozo to make this for us - what do ya think ?"
                                "Sure, all ya gotta do is plant the idea in his simple mind and let him be"

                                The idea interested me but I wasn't about to spend that kind of money for something that might
                                be used once or twice and then sit on a shelf next to my automatic bread maker and blooming onion slicer.

                                Added a bottom to a stainless box from another project and bought a stainless
                                immersion heater and a small 12 volt DC pump rated for water temp up to 195 degrees F.

                                Found the digital PID controller on ebay so I had what I needed to start.
                                Some scrap pieces of polyethylene insulation and a plexi cover and I'm ready to ruin more food.

                                Total cost for pump, controller and heater from ebay was about $95 not including the tank.
                                Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.

                                Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                                Comment

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