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Why buy it for $1 when I can make it myself for $100.

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Burnt hands View Post
    Geoffm,

    Thank you, I am flattered and honored by your interest.

    Here are a few additional photos which may help in your design.

    I split the stainless steel tubing holding the vacuum cup handle so it could swivel to adapt to a curved roof if needed. Once it fit my roof, I tightened up the hose clamp.

    Have fun
    Thanks for that - I got a couple of suction cup gadgets and our local importers emporium the other day, so now to find some time and steel.
    How long is your roller, and is it a single roller or 3 of them? I looked at what was in the boat shops and they were all short - and expensive. Anything with the word "boat" seems to double in price...

    Comment


    • #17
      The roller is 20" long and is 3 pieces.
      The tapered ends were originally one 8" V shaped roller.
      The middle one was a straight 8"roller - 2 1/2" diameter.
      Stainless flat stock is 2" x 1/8" - definitely over-built
      but I had it left from another project.
      Since I don't have a lathe, I had to send the pieces out to a machine shop.
      They trimmed the V roller to match the straight section and made the white bushings.
      Also threaded the 3/4" stainless axle for 3/8-16 bolts.
      Cost a bit, but they did a great job.
      Attached Files
      Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

      Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

      Comment


      • #18
        Another goofy project

        Big animal trap

        I had been having trouble with wildlife getting into my trash cans and chewing holes in my vinyl siding.
        Tried the simple fix to chase them away using moth balls with no luck.
        Set up a game camera and saw that raccoons and a fox seemed to be the problem.
        Bought a bucket trap and a large box trap and set them out.
        No luck after 3 weeks with more chaos and damage.
        Determined to catch them, I felt like Bill Murray in the movie Caddyshack.
        The game cam videos showed that the animals were too smart for the traps.
        They would look in but not enter the traps.
        Battle of wits and I was the nit-wit.
        Or maybe they didn't just like my bait.

        Made this larger version which did the trick.
        Frame is 4 sections of 2 ft x 6 ft stainless metro shelving.
        Used hose clamps to join them together as I needed to reuse them afterwards.
        Door is made from old bed frame angle and expanded metal.
        Trip mechanism took a bit of trial and error to get right.
        Door has drop lock bar to keep it closed.
        Attached Files
        Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

        Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

        Comment


        • #19
          Big trap results

          Part 2

          Modifications made during the trial phase:
          1 - Put a board in the bottom as the animals paws were slipping thru the wire spacing and they would not go in.
          2 - Changed the mechanism lubricant from bacon grease to 90 weight gear lube due to them eating the grease.
          3 - Changed bait from stale bread to stale cheeseburgers.

          Caught 4 raccoons, 3 foxes, and 2 possums and moved them to the small box trap.
          Relocated them to my landscaper friend ( the one who said "need a life") with geese and groundhogs issues on his farm.
          A win-win situation all around.

          PS - No animals were hurt or abused during the life of this of this project.
          However, many aluminum cans of beer were sacrificed to the scrap yard in the process.

          Another goofy project but now that the intruders are relocated, I miss them.
          Go figure!
          Attached Files
          Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

          Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

          Comment


          • #20
            OK - here is another example of an expensive answer to a simple problem.

            Made a bug zapper from some stainless grill racks I had.

            Here is link to a previous post I made with other uses for these racks.

            http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...goofy+projects

            Welded 2 racks together and rolled them into a cylinder.
            Made another one slightly smaller in diameter to fit inside the other.

            Used plastic tubing to insulate them and connected them to an oil burner transformer.
            Top has a cover of plexiglas and bottom sits on a wood table.
            Makes cleaning easier.

            Wanted to get rid of flies and hornets so I used some old cheese and sugar water as bait.

            Works well and every zap I hear means one less fly to land on my food.
            Attached Files
            Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

            Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

            Comment


            • #21
              ok - here is another goofy project.

              My workshop (garage) is small so I have made do as best as I can.
              I used scaffold sections to give me adjustable long span shelves over the weld area.
              Ceiling is 10 ft high so I added a chain hoist off one end of the scaffold to move my plasma cutter
              off the top shelf when I need it.
              Problem is that the chain hoist hooks are 10" apart at the minimum so I can't lift high enough
              to put the plasma cutter on the top shelf.

              Decided to make a poor man's gantry crane using a section of garage roller track.
              I added 2 pieces of 2" x2" square tubing to span the scaffold frames much like planks.
              The roller track is attached to the front and back square tubing.
              The roller track can slide along the front 2x2 tubing. (Front detail photo)
              and it pivots at the back 2x2 tubing connection
              .
              The key to the crane is a neat roller I salvaged from a Nordic track ski trainer.
              It slides on a 5/8" shaft and turns freely in one direction but locks on in the other direction.

              This gives me a "semi" chain hoist. Nylon strap is wrapped around the roller and I
              am able to move equipment up and down from the top shelf.

              The existing chain hoist is visible in one of the photos.
              I can get about 8" closer to the ceiling using this method.
              Attached Files
              Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

              Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

              Comment


              • #22
                Kayak roller

                Originally posted by Geoffm View Post
                I am going to liberate that kayak roller idea - that is brilliant and simple!
                Geoff
                My version of the kayak loading roller. A cheap job from offcuts and 2 suction cups, with a wooden roller made from a fence post

                The only problem is the curve of the windscreen means only the top 2 suction cups touch the windscreen - still works ok and doesn't move. Mark 2 would have the suction cups handle cut in half with a hinge joint so that it can articulate to follow the curve top to bottom.

                Click image for larger version

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                Click image for larger version

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                Comment


                • #23
                  Geoff,

                  Very clever and well thought-out design !

                  Hope you don't turn on the rear wiper when this is installed.

                  Burnt
                  Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

                  Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Burnt hands View Post
                    ok - here is another goofy project.

                    My workshop (garage) is small so I have made do as best as I can.
                    I used scaffold sections to give me adjustable long span shelves over the weld area.
                    Ceiling is 10 ft high so I added a chain hoist off one end of the scaffold to move my plasma cutter
                    off the top shelf when I need it.
                    Problem is that the chain hoist hooks are 10" apart at the minimum so I can't lift high enough
                    to put the plasma cutter on the top shelf.

                    Decided to make a poor man's gantry crane using a section of garage roller track.
                    I added 2 pieces of 2" x2" square tubing to span the scaffold frames much like planks.
                    The roller track is attached to the front and back square tubing.
                    The roller track can slide along the front 2x2 tubing. (Front detail photo)
                    and it pivots at the back 2x2 tubing connection
                    .
                    The key to the crane is a neat roller I salvaged from a Nordic track ski trainer.
                    It slides on a 5/8" shaft and turns freely in one direction but locks on in the other direction.

                    This gives me a "semi" chain hoist. Nylon strap is wrapped around the roller and I
                    am able to move equipment up and down from the top shelf.

                    The existing chain hoist is visible in one of the photos.
                    I can get about 8" closer to the ceiling using this method.
                    My sons did everything too young. I had a snowmobile when Seth was 10 with no reverse. He couldn't pull it in or out of the shed. I took 20' of door track, two rollers, an old come along, and a sling. He could lift it a few inches, spin it around backward, and push it in easily. It was thereby dry and ready to go next run.
                    Dynasty 280DX
                    Bobcat 250
                    MM252
                    Spool gun
                    Twentieth Century 295
                    Twentieth Century 295 AC
                    Marquette spot welder
                    Smith torches

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      ok - here is the latest goofy project just in time for cold weather.

                      A neighbor tossed out a nice stainless bbq but it was huge and heavy which is why it stayed put for a day.
                      Went home and got a hand truck and rolled it 1 block back to my house.

                      Over the years, I have picked up several this way and found them to be a
                      good source of stainless sheet metal and propane burners.

                      Last year I found one at the curb and asked the neighbor if it was trash.
                      He said "yes, please take it as I don't want to clean it. I'll buy a new one next season"
                      Even came with a half tank of propane.

                      The latest one looked good from the outside but the burners and grates were bad.
                      All the sheet metal was good and non-magnetic unlike most of the ones I find.
                      It also had a ceramic searing burner which I used to make this project.
                      Used the stainless sheet metal for the body and reflector and some 3/4" and 1" ips stainless pipe for the support.
                      So the old bbq came back as a nice directional heater.
                      Please excuse the terrible sheet metal work.

                      As usual, I could have saved lots of time and work by buying this one from
                      Harbor Freight but what fun would that have been.
                      Attached Files
                      Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

                      Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        More photos of propane heater showing added reflector.

                        Burner is 3" x 20" and uses about 3/4 lb of propane per hour.
                        Attached Files
                        Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

                        Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Here is the February 2015 goofy project.

                          Got a call from a caterer who got my name from my plumber friend and needed a special press made for a new sandwich he had in mind.
                          Met him, got the details and made this gizmo.
                          He buys shredded potatoes and wanted to press them into 3" x 6" x 1/2" to 3/4" thick hash browns..

                          His special "sandwich" uses 2 of the hash brown bars like bread and he puts a slice of scrapple in the middle.
                          He puts the scrapple in the press to make it the same size as the hash browns.

                          The whole thing is then deep fried and served.
                          I didn't ask for a calorie or fat count but it intrigued me.
                          Just did the welding and didn't ask.

                          Press is made from 1/4" thick 316 ss plate to make it easy to clean.
                          Plus it was what I had on hand.

                          Used my existing HF 1 ton arbor press to test the initial design concept.
                          My arbor press was much too dirty for real production but he liked the concept and went ahead with it.
                          He bought a new HF arbor press for his use.
                          Seems like a lot of work but who knows - maybe he has something here.
                          For a change, I got greenbacks for the work as opposed to the usual beer and pizza from my pals.

                          And I thought I had too much time on my hands.
                          Attached Files
                          Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

                          Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Burnt hands View Post

                            His special "sandwich" uses 2 of the hash brown bars like bread and he puts a slice of scrapple in the middle.
                            He puts the scrapple in the press to make it the same size as the hash browns.

                            The whole thing is then deep fried and served.
                            I didn't ask for a calorie or fat count but it intrigued me.
                            Just did the welding and didn't ask.

                            .
                            SCRAPPLE..... certainly places you in Pa.....

                            never had it fried.... only as headcheese cold..

                            Good Stuff...
                            .

                            *******************************************
                            The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                            “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                            Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                            My Blue Stuff:
                            Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                            Dynasty 200DX
                            Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                            Millermatic 200

                            TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Here is a version of March Madness.

                              Friend has an undercounter sink which is molded into the countertop.
                              Over the years the sink has cracked and pulled away from the countertop at 2 of the corners.
                              Not repairable as it is not solid surface material but rather cheap laminate over particle board.
                              So as usual, I saw the opportunity to do some cutting and tigging.
                              Made a screw jack to take some of the weight off the weak edges.
                              Simple solution would have been a couple blocks of wood and some shims.
                              We'll see how long it is before the sink drops thru.

                              Got paid with Guinness, corned beef and cabbage - life is good.
                              Attached Files
                              Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

                              Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                the ttopic

                                I love the topic, i've been guilty of this myself, in things like repairing fenders for old motorcycles n stuff, I tigged up holes that weren't supposed to be there, fix cracks ext ect spent far more time than the fender was worth, even on a couple that were a few hundred bucks used, butt I had the satisfaction of doing the work, knowing it was the OEM fender for THAT bike and getting a little more practice in

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