Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

The forum is currently undergoing maintenance and is in a 'read-only' mode for the time being. Sorry for the inconvenience.


  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

dump body floor

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • dump body floor

    Started this late yesterday. Floor was hammered, rotted & patched. I cut out the flat part, added a few cross member sections where it was smashed down, now I'll weld in a new floor. It will follow the bend up the side about 2" above where the 45* pc. meets the side.

    One flat sheet centered & then I bent up two side pcs. The reason for doing it this way is handling the side pcs. while bending is easier as there is no crane or fork truck access to the brake I use. It requires an extra seam but the easier handling makes up for it.
    Name:  8ba2924060dbf4146d2b603d51248b67.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  100.1 KB
    Name:  f15234a1f2e62e77973af053945be884.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  122.3 KB

  • #2
    Looks like quite a job. Did you use a plasma cutter to remove the floor?

    Comment


    • #3
      I used a torch as my plasma is not portable. Not enough aux. power. Doing this in my customers yard.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MMW View Post
        Started this late yesterday. Floor was hammered, rotted & patched. I cut out the flat part, added a few cross member sections where it was smashed down, now I'll weld in a new floor. It will follow the bend up the side about 2" above where the 45* pc. meets the side.

        One flat sheet centered & then I bent up two side pcs. The reason for doing it this way is handling the side pcs. while bending is easier as there is no crane or fork truck access to the brake I use. It requires an extra seam but the easier handling makes up for it.
        Name:  8ba2924060dbf4146d2b603d51248b67.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  100.1 KB
        Name:  f15234a1f2e62e77973af053945be884.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  122.3 KB
        I have a C65 I carry 13000 in a 14' dump box, sometimes boulders. I'm pretty careful setting them in but it can get rough dumping them. Oak 2-1/4" floor held up OK about seven years, now it's rotten. I have considered yellow pine pressure treated or steel. Cross members are about 16" apart Could steel work better? How thick, would it be lighter than 200 lb planks 10" wide? Should I add cross members for steel?

        Comment


        • #5
          I would not use pine or pressure treated as it won't hold up. If going wood replacing the oak with oak would be best.

          If you went steel 1/4" plate is 10.2# sq. ft. 3/16" plate is 7.15# sq. ft. Load will slide out better with steel. You could always add a few extra cross members while the floor is out.

          Comment


          • #6
            Finally got to finish this up. Ran out of time on Monday. Left the floor long in the back & then cut to fit it to the gate. No bigger gap than 1/8" now. First pic is from the other day.

            Name:  c809031e5bd56aee3fefb7b2fe98427d.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  90.9 KB

            Name:  5a4cca2dd917cf2a4584af1b3c63b94e.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  84.5 KB

            Name:  f3b7a393a1990c2e7512d4e66d13c70c.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  72.6 KB
            Last edited by MMW; 01-25-2014, 07:26 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow!! Great job!!

              Comment

              Working...
              X
              Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.