Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Railing job.

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Railing job.

    This is what i have been doing at work for the last few weeks. Normally we make these work platforms and they have 2x2 sq tube posts and welded cross bars from 1 1/2" tubing. This batch of platforms has 1 5/8" formed railing with cross rails that need coped. So i have like 390 rail sections to fit and tack together for the welders. Plus they have pockets that the rails sit in and need to all be removable. I have found the quickest way to cope the 1 5/8" tube is with a grinder and 36 grit sanding disc. Like 30 seconds per end. Just measure between the uprights and add 1/2". Then scribe a line 1/4" from the tube end and grind to the line while feathering to the center of the tube then roll the tube 180 degrees and do the other side. Piece of cake...Bob
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Its 1-1/4" sch.40 pipe not tube.
    Im going to search for a tool and post a picture. this tool is design to shear offthe right amount. For the fish mouth. All thats needed is a hydraulic press.
    Last edited by eecervantes83; 11-04-2013, 06:51 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      We have an iron worker and the company bought notching dies for it. But in the 8 weeks its going to take to fab up these platforms the hole punching station will be down because thats where the notcher goes. Plus the iron worker is a long way from my bench and its quicker for me to grind as i have been doing. No if the iron worker was right next to me i would use it, but we still can't punch holes..Bob

      Comment


      • #4
        Well heres the picture for anyone o
        Else who hasnt seen or used one. Just slide the pipe in and notch takes less than 10seconds to do both side with minimal to no grinding.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by eecervantes83; 11-04-2013, 07:12 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Nice work Bob
          Coping looks pretty good too
          Tubes they will drive you nuts

          Ji

          Comment


          • #6
            Bob

            Excellent craftsmanship.

            To heck with the tubing notcher - your technique sounds faster and looks fantastic when finished.

            Comment


            • #7
              Its 1 1/2" 1/8" wall tubing. We were using 1 5/8" but changed somewhere along the way...Bob

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by eecervantes83 View Post
                Well heres the picture for anyone o
                Else who hasnt seen or used one. Just slide the pipe in and notch takes less than 10seconds to do both side with minimal to no grinding.
                What brand is this tool? Anybody have a link? Thanks.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Why in the world would you not use a hand notcher for this ?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fabricator View Post
                    Why in the world would you not use a hand notcher for this ?
                    We don't have one. There are 10 different ways to do this job for sure and some are better than others and i am just showing how to do it minus the notchers most people don't have..Bob

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
                      What brand is this tool? Anybody have a link? Thanks.
                      Vogel is the best, I have one set up for 2" (2 3/8" O.D.) schedule forty, makes a fit Ray Charles could have sewed up and he was blind

                      Williams Low Buck makes a real nice economical notcher too. I have one of those I use for 1", 1 1/4", and 1 1/2" pipe, it works great too.

                      As he said there is a thousand ways to do this. Unless I have a bunch to do I just freehand the copes with either a band saw, grinder, or plasma.

                      One of the tricks I teach is make copes with a framing or even a speed square, no matter what the size of the tubing, same principle.

                      Place the square perpendicular to the tubing. Measure from the edge of the tubing to the leading edge of the square. On 2" ( 2 3/8" O.D.) for instance it would read about three quarter's of an inch.

                      Let's say you're doing a strut between two verticals. You would add 1 1/2" to your inside to inside measurement ( 3/4" + 3/4" =1 1/2") inside measurement is 30" so your cut measurement is 31 1/2".

                      If your tubing has a seam then it makes it simpler. What you want to do is measure in 3/4" in both ends on the same line. Then you want to freehand an arc where that 3/4" inch mark is in the middle. and the edges of the arc end up at the edges of the tubing.

                      After those are marked/cut then you roll the tubing over 180 degrees and do the same thing. You should have a perfect fit.

                      One thing you don't want if you like doing pretty work is a fit so tight that you have to hammer it in to place, or a fit where you are too short and use something to squeeze it together enough to weld it up. You will have exaggerated your mistake.

                      It doesn't matter if it's 2" pipe or 7" tubing. Wall thickness can't create issues, thin wall like Rigid pipe or sprinkler schedule ten material means you have to be more careful and have a wider arc to cut. Heavy wall like 1/2" will shorten the arc cut.

                      Have fun.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X
                      Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.