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My Utility Trailer

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  • My Utility Trailer

    I decided to take on a big project...building a trailer. It's a 7X10 with a fold down ramp. I built the side rails low so I could load a couple of ATV's from the side. It is made from 2X3 tubing for the frame and the side rails are 2X2. The floor is 14ga tread plate and the fold down gate is 4' and is made from 1X2 channel iron with mesh wire. It is attached to the framed with barrel hinges. Here it is as of Saturday; I finished the floor and installed the gate. I plan on doing the light brackets/housing. I can't decide if I want the taillights at the back underneath or out to the side up by the rear fender. My plans for finishing is to put a bed liner on the floor and then paint the rest. I'm using my bobcat 225G as a generator to power my Lincoln mig SP 130T using flux core wire.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Why not just use the Bobcat as a welder, and stick rod it? You would get better penetration and stronger welds than with that little Lincoln.

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    • #3
      I have actually welded the frame with my bobcat. I chose the mig to attach the floor.

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      • #4
        Hey that looks really good to me. I would prefer the lights on the fenders because when they are down lower on the rear they seem to get broken more often. I want to move my lights for that reason. Any way looks nice.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TTREB4 View Post
          I have actually welded the frame with my bobcat. I chose the mig to attach the floor.
          Well, that's better to hear, 120 Volt MIGs are not the weapon of choice for doing trailer frames. The Bobcat was a wiser decision, it just sounded like you did the whole trailer with the MIG while the Bobcat only served as a power supply. It would be a good idea to run a few beads on the flooring with the Bobcat too, just to make sure it stays where you want it.
          In the future you may want to consider cleaning the rust off your metal and priming it before all the cutting and welding. Then just knock the primer off where the welds need to be made. It's easier than doing it after all is said and done, but your about to find this out yourself. Cheaper than getting it sandblasted after the fact too, just saying. When I get new steel home to do a project, I most near always clean and prime first to avoid having to try to get into all the nooks and crannies later to clean it. It's easier on long straight pieces on saw horses than a finished project, but that's just me.
          Other than that, post up pix of the finished job when you can. Try to put your lighting where it will be protected from getting torn off/damaged on the road.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bistineau View Post
            Well, that's better to hear, 120 Volt MIGs are not the weapon of choice for doing trailer frames. The Bobcat was a wiser decision, it just sounded like you did the whole trailer with the MIG while the Bobcat only served as a power supply. It would be a good idea to run a few beads on the flooring with the Bobcat too, just to make sure it stays where you want it.
            In the future you may want to consider cleaning the rust off your metal and priming it before all the cutting and welding. Then just knock the primer off where the welds need to be made. It's easier than doing it after all is said and done, but your about to find this out yourself. Cheaper than getting it sandblasted after the fact too, just saying. When I get new steel home to do a project, I most near always clean and prime first to avoid having to try to get into all the nooks and crannies later to clean it. It's easier on long straight pieces on saw horses than a finished project, but that's just me.
            Other than that, post up pix of the finished job when you can. Try to put your lighting where it will be protected from getting torn off/damaged on the road.
            Actually the mig is 220V and puts out pretty good heat. Thats a very good idea. I never really thought of priming my bare metal before I started the project. I know I'm in for some good work getting into the corners and getting the rust off. The floor, ramp and inside rail will be sprayed with the truck bed liner. The rest will be painted with an automotive paint.

            Hey that looks really good to me. I would prefer the lights on the fenders because when they are down lower on the rear they seem to get broken more often. I want to move my lights for that reason. Any way looks nice.
            I think I'll put the lights up by the rear fender and add a step in that area to help protect the lights.

            Today, 04:49 PM
            TTREB4

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            • #7
              I had already started doing it on most of my projects. Then one night watching Modern Marvels "Ship Yards" on History Channel, they were showing when a shipyard gets a load of steel in, the first thing that happens is it goes to the painters for sand blasting and priming. Then it is sorted for size, and stacked, waiting for the welders to get it and start cutting it to shape. I figure ship yards know a lot about working with steel. So now that is what I do whenever I get my steel if I know it will be a several day project. Even if it's not, it is still way easier to deal with it in long straight pieces than in short pieces angled in all directions. I believe after you finish this trailer, you will think about this before starting your next project.
              A side benefit of pre-priming your metal is, your hands, gloves and clothes stay cleaner during the build while handling it.
              On this project, when you do the cleaning process, if it looks like you won't finish all the cleaning and priming in one day, stop soon enough to prime the areas you have cleaned before quitting for the day. That way it will be protected from any light surface rust that may start overnight or from dew settling on it. Be sure to wipe it down well with paint thinner after de-rusting it and before applying primer.
              Last edited by Bistineau; 09-10-2013, 06:17 AM.

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              • #8
                Light Placement

                You might want to consult the authorities as to how much over hang you can legally have behind your lights. With the lights mounted at the fenders a vehicle approaching say from a highway on ramp on your right will find the left side light invisible blocked by the trailer. Maybe enclosed brackets at the back to protect the fixtures?---Meltedmetal

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                • #9
                  Looks nice . I hope those open gas containers were relocated for the welding. I know, it is just force of habit from onsite job work. All part of getting a '' HOT WORK PERMIT.''

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                  • #10
                    It's looking great. Goodluck.

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                    • #11
                      Yea gas containers are a hard thing to deal with and being a firefighter i try to set an example but sometimes one sneaks in my garage from my dad using it somewhere. I have a flammable cabinet but it will only hold 3 -5gal jugs so i stage them out in my pole barn which is a little safer. I agree with treating our home jobs like were at work. Trailer looks good man keep on welding.

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                      • #12
                        My Utility Trailer

                        Trailer looks sweet!!! Like the Ole Glory graphics on your hood.
                        Bistineau has a great point I've definitely over looked. Makes completely great sense.

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                        • #13
                          Just thought I would check back in with ya and see how the cleaning and priming is going with this trailer. Have you made any more progress with it? It can be a bi+ch sometimes trying to get all the rust off a project after all the welding is done, as opposed to doing it in long straight pieces on saw horses. Just waiting to see the end result of your work in progress.

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