Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Need advice on bracket supports

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Need advice on bracket supports

    Hey Everybody,
    What U see here is the front bracket that holds the lower bar in a triangulated 4 bar rear suspension. There was no way to weld to the bottom of the frame, brackets for running boards, so this is how I was told to mount them.

    Will welding the wings to the frame (red lines), as well as along the bottom seam where the bracket sits on top of the frame lip, be strong enough to hold this suspension component or should I add plates someplace?

    This is a street rod, (39 Chevy) not a race car. Suspension will be ShockWaves by Ride Tech. Any advice is appreciated.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    I would add some more metal to go the width of the bracket at least. Just my thoughts...Bob

    Comment


    • #3
      First question I have is how thick is the frame rail itself? If you weld the wings as you show & the frame is not thick enough it will tear the rail itself. you can get around this by adding a flat plate over the rail to stiffen it. Maybe about 3 or 4" on each side of the bracket & just shy of flush on top & bottom. Weld it all the way around plus plug weld several times in the mid section. Then weld the bracket to this plate. The wings will help tremendously as will a third gusset in the middle going up. (something that looks like the wings but centered)

      Looking at it again I think I'm misunderstanding you. The bracket already has small wings (gussets). Make the wings bigger from the top point to the inner most part of the bracket. Again it all depends on how thick the frame rail is.

      Wow 30 seconds in person & I could show you but trying to explain is difficult.
      Last edited by MMW; 03-03-2013, 11:33 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
        I would add some more metal to go the width of the bracket at least. Just my thoughts...Bob
        Thanks Bob. Do you mean like this(white line in image)
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #5
          I would put a gusset on the bottom of the frame rail to the side of the bracket and then box the top in a bit. You could box it with something like. It will just help to spread the load out a bit.

          Also, good point on the thickness of the frame rail. You can make the bracket nice and strong but if the frame just tears off it doesn't matter.

          With as long as the bracket is and how far below the frame it drops I would want something to stiffen it side to side. Are the brackets made from 3/16? I think 1/8" would be plenty for boxing anything in. You could also add speed holes and stuff to save a little weight while still making it stronger.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by elvis View Post
            I would put a gusset on the bottom of the frame rail to the side of the bracket and then box the top in a bit. You could box it with something like. It will just help to spread the load out a bit.

            Also, good point on the thickness of the frame rail. You can make the bracket nice and strong but if the frame just tears off it doesn't matter.

            With as long as the bracket is and how far below the frame it drops I would want something to stiffen it side to side. Are the brackets made from 3/16? I think 1/8" would be plenty for boxing anything in. You could also add speed holes and stuff to save a little weight while still making it stronger.
            Thanks for the reply. I was thinking that a gusset on the bottom might be needed. I did box the back in. You can see the weld in the picture on the left. Do you think boxing the front is a good idea also. I did use 1/8" plate to box.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Terp View Post
              Thanks for the reply. I was thinking that a gusset on the bottom might be needed. I did box the back in. You can see the weld in the picture on the left. Do you think boxing the front is a good idea also. I did use 1/8" plate to box.
              It is easier to cut a small gusset and install it now than deal with it ripped off later!

              Okay, so I am looking at the first picture you posted as a reference.

              On the "U" shaped piece with red lines around it: I would box this somehow. Your vertical risers have a funny shape so that might be hard. A third "middle" vertical gusset would help. Basically it would spread the load out. That lower arm will take a good amount of front to back force and what is stopping it from twisting?

              On the arm of the bracket where the joint is: I see the front boxed. I would put a small piece on the back and weld it in place. You could make it look nice with a shape like ")(" where the center is connected. It would just help that part of the bracket resist twisting.

              How much horse power is this system supporting? Also, what kind of joints are those? Do my suggestions make sense? I don't think you need to add much material. Just a little bit in a few spots and it should be solid!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by elvis View Post
                On the arm of the bracket where the joint is: I see the front boxed. I would put a small piece on the back and weld it in place. You could make it look nice with a shape like ")(" where the center is connected. It would just help that part of the bracket resist twisting.
                I'm really unclear on where I should box. Do you mean that I should close the entire bracket in? Looks aren't that important, you will never see this unless the car is on a lift.

                Originally posted by elvis View Post
                How much horse power is this system supporting? Also, what kind of joints are those? Do my suggestions make sense? I don't think you need to add much material. Just a little bit in a few spots and it should be solid!
                Engine is an LT4 with a mild cam. Probably somewhere around 385-400HP. I'm at the age where I'm not gonna be stickin my foot in it, well, not all the time anyway Trans is 4L80. The joints came with the bars from Ride Tech. I ordered a their triangulated 4 bar setup for air ride. Although I didn't order polished stainless, that is what they sent me I was thinking that it (the brackets) needed some gusseting, I just wasn't sure where.

                A few more pictures for reference.
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just my opinion, but the bracket seems plenty stout, as it has 3 sides. It does seem a bit long, but not overly I suppose. So long as the part that hangs down is fully welded to the upper piece, I see no problem with your plan. There are a ton of hot rods on the road with a lot less metal and weld holding their 4 bars on. You might register over on The Hamb board over at Jalopy journal. They are usually more traditional, so you may not want to mention the LT4. Lot of knowledgeable folks there.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The side walls of the chevy frames are not all that thick. I would weld a doubler to the frame and then weld the bracket to it. Unless you are going to run huge power and torque you should be good to go. I am doing a 36 chev coupe and need a passenger side door. If you have any leads where I can find one it would be greatly appreciated. Larry

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree that the brackets look to be strong enough. As said I would weld a plate to the frame about twice as long as the bracket. Then weld the bracket to the plate.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by oldtimer View Post
                        The side walls of the chevy frames are not all that thick. I would weld a doubler to the frame and then weld the bracket to it. Larry
                        I am guessing that you don't plan to take any of these out onto salted roads in the winter time but I was wondering what product, design or procedure (if any) are you planning to use or would recommend to stop the corrosion that is likely already under way on the frame and is likely to continue between the doubler plate and the original frame? Or do you think it will never be a problem?
                        Meltedmetal

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          it looks to me like the part of the bracket that comes down is not the same thickness as the one that mounts to the frame if it were mine i would use those as a pattern and make some the same thickness as the U shaped one and box it in and make a gusset on top of the U shaped bracket out of square tubing . you mentioned looks are not that important some day you might want to sell this thing and that is the stuff people look at to see how well something is built . we are not talking much work here just a little more time . good luck let us know what you figure out . chris

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X
                          Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.