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What kind of paint for my trailer?

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  • What kind of paint for my trailer?

    I will be welding up a sturdy 4x8 utility trailer that has a drop-bed feature. I need recommendations on paint. Here are the criteria:
    • I will be storing it outside.
    • It must be very durable; Rustoleum will not do; I have that on my current trailer.
    • Must be gloss black.
    • Looking at epoxy primers.
    • Looking at two-part urethane finishes or epoxy for the top coat.
    • Not spray-applied. I will roll and tip the finish (roll it on and tip off any bubbles with a brush).
    • No need for supplied-air type respirators; organic cartridges for vapors and mists will be used. I know some high-tech commercial finishes need special filters and even booths for ventilation because they are so toxic to brain cells; I don't want that.
    • Applied in a heated garage in a Michigan December.
    • Would prefer it in quarts, gallons if I must, but not 5-gallon pails.
    • Did I mention durable and glossy black?

    I got a quote from a commercial painting service that does agricultural equipment for $500, which seems high for a little trailer with a wood bed. They use a Sherwin-Williams epoxy primer with a two-part urethane top coat, spray applied. I looked up the products and they are only available in five-gallon pails.

    I have worked with epoxy coatings in the past while building wooden boats and coating my garage floor. I am familiar with their working characteristics. I like the durability and the low odor.

    Any recommendations?

  • #2
    What kind of paint for my trailer?

    Worked in body shop that also did welding & fabricating. We painted everything from V-W's to tractor trailers including farm equipment. That was 25 years ago so I'm not up on the latest methods.
    But in my experience adhesion to the metal is the major failure not the paint braking down.
    What we found to work best was to sand blast metal, then use a metal acid to etch metal then applied a zinc chromate primer, sealer then paint.
    My pick for paint on trailers (for durability & longevity) was the old faithful, straight or as we called it synthetic enamel with a catalyst. It is not as hard as the urethane's so it will scratch easier but is less prone to cracking or chipping. It is what they used on farm equipment for many years. Also cheaper.
    I'm not a expert just a old timer.

    Comment


    • #3
      If I want somthing to have a durable finish that is painted on with a roller and brush I just paint it with a truck bed liner, but Im not sure if thats the finish you would desire. It is very durable though. Im no expert just my .02 cents

      MM

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      • #4
        keep it simple

        Ok I work in Detroit so I understand the Michigan weather. You are way over thinking this Frank. Real simple go to tractor supply or another hardware and get some red oxide primer and a couple gallons of tractor and implement enamel paint 2 coats primer 3 coats paint. If you sandblast/wire wheel the trailer it will hold up the best for the money. We paint a lot of trailers and equipment at work when we get slow and don't want to pay someone. The good news is it holds up better rolled than sprayed.

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        • #5
          Sound like you need/want a stainless Steel trailer

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          • #6
            For the red oxide primer, I've not found one that works better than Rust Destroyer (certainly better than Rustoleum's red oxide). You can buy it here in CA in quarts at about $25. I prefer to roll and brush too. Good luck!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Rezeppa View Post
              Ok I work in Detroit so I understand the Michigan weather. You are way over thinking this Frank. Real simple go to tractor supply or another hardware and get some red oxide primer and a couple gallons of tractor and implement enamel paint 2 coats primer 3 coats paint. If you sandblast/wire wheel the trailer it will hold up the best for the money. We paint a lot of trailers and equipment at work when we get slow and don't want to pay someone. The good news is it holds up better rolled than sprayed.
              Sorry, but I am going to have to disagree. I have done the enamel route and I am not satisfied with the long term results.

              I have a few spots of epoxy on my driveway from where I was coating some wood pieces. Two years later and it is still holding tenaciously. A two-part urethane top coat should be also durable and prevent the epoxy from yellowing.

              There is a reason the shop I called uses that system; it works well.

              I am looking for brand names of products to use; hopefully in quart sizes.

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              • #8
                What kind of paint for my trailer?

                Cool I would like to learn more. let me know what you come up with. If you find something reasonable that works great please let me know. I have always gone the enamel route due to costs and longevity. It just seems like that is what everyone does, but if two part epoxy paints are so much more superior let me know the details so I can try it.

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                • #9
                  We use industrial Imron for outdoor equipmnt, its bout 10 times as good as common enamels.

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                  • #10
                    I did not know that you could brush or roll Imron. We always sprayed it in the shop I worked at.
                    Nick

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                    • #11
                      You could try POR-15 for a primer. We find it is very durable. A local fertilizer company uses it to prime fertilizer spreaders. In my opinion it is better rolled or brushed. Pay particular attention to the handling warnings though because once it hardens it has to be mechanically removed. You even have to put plastic wrap (2 ply) under the lid after you open it or you can not get the lid off the second time(voice of experience). It is not UV resistant so it must be covered with some other paint to block the UV.
                      Meltedmetal

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                      • #12
                        It will eat up a spong brush in short order but have used lots of it for touch up, trim, etc, paint off a black bumper., Dont do it in room, have breeze blowing by. I use mostly Industrial now available at many jobbers, there is a plane truck grade too, a bit more flex, dries faster but 3X the cost. The Ind makes it competitive in cost, especially considering prep/blast time and longevity. Mostly blast, use Corlar primer, it is also rated for over tight rust, abraded, its sub should be around 220 grit or so ideally.

                        Another thing to consider if sand plasting is to run hand scotchbrite over after blast, it doesnt take a lot but removes sand and you can feel the difference between this and unsanded, un leave such rough spots it tends to "poke thru" many primers, knock off, smooth up, lasts a LOT longer. Can go over tight old paint also.

                        15 yrs on this gas tank, still shines with no maintenance, in a year enamel is fading, I actually will find a side by side, I have a couple. Same for painting tractors, in 10 the JD from them looks well worn, the Imron still looks new with wash, will be a one time event barring physical damage and the factory pak colors are about perfect,,, better than the enamels from the dealer.

                        2 drawback to the ind, one,, it wants to orange peel some, hard to get the perfect finish,,, this is soon forgotton though and its slow to dry and hazzardous to paint.
                        Attached Files

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                        • #13
                          Frank,

                          I gather you wish to do the work yourself as we all do.

                          Have you considered powder coating?

                          My limited experience is from a sculpture I have had outside at a friends NJ shore home for 4 years.

                          Fido is all steel. and has held up well.
                          Granted, he doesn't get beaten up like your trailer would but when I visit him, he shows no rust.
                          His body is the brown powder coating but the other colors are oil based rustoleum and show some flaking.
                          Under the flaking, there is still no rust.

                          But...........................Fido cost $250 for sand blasting and powder coating so I told him to get a job to pay his way.
                          He was buried about 10" deep in sand by Hurricane Sandy but his owners rescued him using a metal detector as he was not microchipped - my fault.

                          Anyway, here is the company who did the work for me.

                          http://www.brookspowdercoating.com/p...sts/index.html

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                          • #14
                            OOPs - Here is Fido

                            Forgot to attach his photo.
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              Also recommend POR-15

                              Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
                              You could try POR-15 for a primer. We find it is very durable.
                              I also vote for POR-15 primer and also the finish coats.. I have it on my 4Runner skid plating and rock slider bars.. Very durable.. It has excellent leveling properties which makes a brush job have the smoothness of a spray job..

                              As mentioned in quote, pay attention to warnings in using the stuff...

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