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  • Custom Wrench

    At work one of the machines that we are in the process of designing had a bolt that was inaccessible with a torque wrench using standard tools. We needed a custom tool to access the bolt so that we could properly torque it down. Using an oxyacetylene torch I bent the handle of the ratcheting combination wrench to make the open end side of the wrench parallel to the ratcheting box end. Next I welded an impact socket on the open end side to allow for access with a 3/8 extension and a torque wrench. I made a 14 mm to 10 mm hex adapter to allow us to use a 14 mm wrench with the 10 mm hex required to tighten the inaccessible M12 bolts, because we were concerned that the M10 ratcheting combination wrench would be too wimpy.

    One thing I noticed was that the thinner socket needed more heat than the thicker open end wrench to make them both the same color during welding. I am assuming that this might be because the socket had more carbon than the open end wrench and a higher melting temperature.
    Attached Files
    Miller Thunderbolt
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport
    Miller Spectrum 375 Plasma Torch

  • #2
    How do you calculate the foot pounds since you added mechanical advantage to the torque wrench?

    Comment


    • #3
      Foot-pounds is simply how many pounds of force you apply one foot away. If one is even moderately competent with the math, easy to scale it up or down. Most of the old-time Cat mechanics or JD mechanics, that I knew anyway, didn't even own a torque wrench. Torqued every bolt, even the head bolts, up by feel.
      Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

      Comment


      • #4
        Always making new tools to get the job done.
        Great work.

        Ji
        Grip it and Rip it

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JSFAB View Post
          Foot-pounds is simply how many pounds of force you apply one foot away. If one is even moderately competent with the math, easy to scale it up or down. Most of the old-time Cat mechanics or JD mechanics, that I knew anyway, didn't even own a torque wrench. Torqued every bolt, even the head bolts, up by feel.
          Attached is a picture with the calculaton for the diminished torque when used with an extension. (Courtesy of Dale M.)

          The attached calculation is wrong.
          The correct one is on post #13
          Attached Files
          Last edited by Don52; 09-09-2012, 08:58 PM.
          Miller Thunderbolt
          Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
          Miller Dynasty 200DX
          Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
          Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
          16" DuAll Saw
          15" Drill Press
          7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
          20 Ton Arbor Press
          Bridgeport
          Miller Spectrum 375 Plasma Torch

          Comment


          • #6
            Been a few times, years ago, when I sure coulda used that kinda thinking. The welding hobby is pretty recent for me. Nice one, man. Nice one.
            Professional firefighter (retired). Amateur everything else I try to do...
            Oh yeah: GO BIG RED!

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for the info re torque wrench extension.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Don52 View Post
                Attached is a picture with the calculaton for the diminished torque when used with an extension. (Courtesy of Dale M.)
                Don52,

                If the first formula is used, it appears that the output torque is actually increased when using an extension, even though the input torque remains the same. So, it follows... if the input torque at the handle is 150#, and the extension is equal to the length of the wrench (in effect doubling the length), then the output torque is 300#.
                Regards,
                Goodhand

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Goodhand View Post
                  Don52,

                  If the first formula is used, it appears that the output torque is actually increased when using an extension, even though the input torque remains the same. So, it follows... if the input torque at the handle is 150#, and the extension is equal to the length of the wrench (in effect doubling the length), then the output torque is 300#.
                  Regards,
                  Goodhand
                  And that's the whole point of the exercise. One formula says if your wrench is set for 150, you get 300 with the extension. The other formula says if you want 300, then set your wrench to 150. The formulas allow you to substitute different values for your extension length, wrench length, and the desired torque to be applied (which is usually known).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    on-line calc

                    I like this one

                    http://www.belknaptools.com/support-...ns-calculator/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Don52 View Post
                      Attached is a picture with the calculaton for the diminished torque when used with an extension. (Courtesy of Dale M.)
                      This formula differs from the BELKNAP calculator.
                      The Divisor A ( first calculation) and Dividend A (second calculation) should replaced by the L (length of wrench) in both cases.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        nice job. what did you do to heat treat it after bending and welding it? i ask becuase i fix specialty tools at work sometimes when they break and from what ive learned if you dont treat it some how its just gona break again. so far what works best for me it get it red hot then quinch in heat treat oil. those calculation charts are cool good to know. do you guys not have a torque checker? we have one at work and its amazing how much different extenstions and what not change the torque.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by R W View Post
                          This formula differs from the BELKNAP calculator.
                          The Divisor A ( first calculation) and Dividend A (second calculation) should replaced by the L (length of wrench) in both cases.
                          The Belknap calculation is correct.
                          The one in my previous post is wrong.
                          Attached is my derivation.
                          Sorry for the confusion
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by Don52; 09-09-2012, 08:57 PM.
                          Miller Thunderbolt
                          Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
                          Miller Dynasty 200DX
                          Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
                          Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
                          16" DuAll Saw
                          15" Drill Press
                          7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
                          20 Ton Arbor Press
                          Bridgeport
                          Miller Spectrum 375 Plasma Torch

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by slow50 View Post
                              what did you do to heat treat it after bending and welding it? i ask becuase i fix specialty tools at work sometimes when they break and from what ive learned if you dont treat it some how its just gona break again. so far what works best for me it get it red hot then quinch in heat treat oil.
                              In this case the hot bend in the wrench was so far away from the bolt that the stress was very much diminished by the moment arm of the extension so I just let the wrench cool off in the air.
                              Miller Thunderbolt
                              Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
                              Miller Dynasty 200DX
                              Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
                              Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
                              16" DuAll Saw
                              15" Drill Press
                              7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
                              20 Ton Arbor Press
                              Bridgeport
                              Miller Spectrum 375 Plasma Torch

                              Comment

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