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  • Portable Welder
    started a topic New welding shop tube heater

    New welding shop tube heater

    My existing shop is 38' x 40' with a 16' ceiling and I just did an addition that is 40' x 80' with a 18' ceiling, The existing shop has a 150 btu hanging forced air furnace.

    I'm wanting to do a radiant tube heater in the new shop and was thinking it would be best if I put it over top of my welding table that is 22' long so it heats the table and the table can hold the heat.

    My problem is that the table is on the opposite end of the building approximately 72' away.
    My question is do I use one big heater or will I be better served with 2 smaller ones.

    Or would I be better off not worrying about heating the tables and run one long one the length of the building.

    Your input will be appreciated.

  • Sberry
    replied
    I have ceiling fan over it and on occasion hang a blower and makeshift duct in winter and can blow heat directional. Can even blow under cars trucks in winter on drain pad for de-icing, can hot pressure wash outside, cut the crud off, pull in, blow dry, especially overnight, crispy as a cracker in the morning.

    On occasion I do customer car/pickup repair, cherry pick type things, have them drop off night before, wash, dry, it was a particular feature I knew I wanted when I built a new shop, was tired of winter time crap, I made a good way to deal with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I used heavy wall for mine, cause I could get it, 8 inch casing. It works pretty good, I insulated it with fiberglass, hit it with a hammer to clean it. At the time I had a crane, cut hole in roof and set it thru. I am sure there is some waste, don't care. I want to build a new stove one of these days, this was a toss together deal, I wasted a little time on a couple things that didn't work out, would like to put grates and a pan in but this holds coals if taken care of, don't have to do restarts.

    Also if I was to do it again might replace the front with a big flat plate like I saw others and cut the sides out, about 3x4, weld right stiffeners and brackets to it on heavier plate, 1/4 or so and weld back in, only real reason this warp up so bad is I really roast some garbage in this thing. It was sposed to be temporary but worked well enough neverer replace or upgrade it, love the big door.

    Leave a comment:


  • Portable Welder
    replied
    I'd better stick with the first one you showed, The second one might be a little to HOT to keep around. ( Not to mention how cold my bed would be when my wife discovers the new heater. )

    I'm sure the 1 st one would be way cheaper to operate.

    Sberry, A mistake I made with my wood stove was that I wanted a pipe that would last for ever so I used a pc. of 6 x 6 x 3/16" structural tube and because it was so heavy it took alot to heat up and a cold pipe wont draft as well as a thinner one.

    I'm going to have to make a bigger stove for the new shop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    Shop heaters.
    Attached Files

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  • WyoRoy
    replied
    Very workable idea! To be fair though, you need to grab a 55 gallon barrel and some garden hose to go state-of-the-art with in-floor heating. Just kidding.

    The first couple of winters after I had my shop built I was doing basically the same method. Probably still would be going the cheap route, but found it didn't do a thing for rust on the machine tools, both from the water vapor in the exhaust and during the non-heat cycles. If I didn't own the machines, I'd most likely go with this method and forget thermostats, gas bills, etc.

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  • drpipe
    replied
    New welding shop tube heater

    I'm laughing myass off reading this ... I don't know why? I live in Alaska I have a small barrel style stove made out of 16" pipe in the corner but I use my table heater I love it it us not worth snapping a picture of ... I have a piece of six inch pipe at a 45* angle under the table about 30" long it has a piece of 1" plate tacked over 2/3 of the top end of pipe u run a weed burner in through the bottem of pipe it's hooked to a twenty foot hose hooked to a propane bottle stored in the corner next to my oxy act. Rack .... My system might be a little backwoods but it heats up my 3/4 inch 12 x6 table and me nicely

    Leave a comment:


  • Doughboyracer
    replied
    Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
    Hey guys, Yes I could still put the radiant heat in the floor and no doubt its the best except in my situation, I like it warm when I'm here and we get times when we are out on a portable for days at a time and when I come home at night I may only be in the shop for a couple hours at night preping stuff for the next day so I think the radiant will work best for my situation.
    Keeping it at 45 all the time would be my ideal and not cost all that much with good insulation and in floor...feels warmer than that when it comes from the floor and you can supplement when needed.

    Do you store any liquids out there? Paint, cleaning, weed killer, Liquid fertilizer...ect. needs to stay above freezing. You may have other storage for that...IDK.

    On the overhead heat I would do what Sberry said...and some ceiling fans too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I assume you will keep the place above freezing all the time and want a boost when needed, You probably have more insulation than I do but I stay at 50, maybe 55 or so in winter, when it snows you can feel the place heat up easier. As I said before I used to turn on the unit over bench to rosy it up a little when I knew I was standing there doing layout or design, maybe run for 20-30 mins just to put a little glow on, the benches will store a bit of heat but probably rather insignificant in the grand scheme of things.

    At the temps atapullingng cold unitit doesntnt make a big deal, you can feel it when a door is opened in real cold weather but it recovers quick anisn'tnt that warm to start with. keep my office a bit warmer butDon't't mind wearing a pair of uninsulated bibs anyway, can go in and out without dressing up or down, keeps cloths cleaner, less wear and a bit of protection. Its not uncomfortable.

    Sitting at a puter would be one thing but my shop is 80 ft across, we are pretty much on the move, its pretty rare I feel chilly, keep ceiling fans on. Not real bad even on smokin hot days like we had recently, beats out in the sun.

    Only occasions warmer would help a little is painting, which I can schedule most of the time and not as much anymore and drying cars but thats not much a problem either as I can blow warm on them and usually wash first, bring in over night and they crispy as a cracker in the morn if I cut off ice first which I usually do, they are pretty much done dripping in 2 or 3 hrs. I have floor drain pad, 2 or 3 easily can sit, move into work area or hoist when they are dry.

    Actual welding work is fairly minor, we weld often, not a lot, if that makes sense. Biggest real weld/fab job I did in recent history was about a month 2 winters ago, repairs some tractor rims this week, about half a day of real faDidn'te. Didnt cut or weld anything today that I can recall. Most days a cut or tack here or there, comes in squirts.

    While I might find use for crane rails I don't need them. I have portable A frame, floor jacks, auto/light truck hoist and cherry picker, most of my rigging is outside and I have crane on truck. I got to have the A frame but its really rare I use it. I use the little cherry picker a quite a bit.

    I have 2 buildings, shop and storage which is 80X100, actually 60x100 with 20x100 lean to which I really like. If I don't need it in here out it goes, still keep the sdoesn'tf but doesnt need to be warm and I like it clean free space, empty for the most part unless I am actively working on sdon'thing. I dont have to move this to do that, pit stop kind of space open floor, can turn a car or pickup around without opening a door or moving junk. I do have a flat section, close enough to build a trailer etc on. Sloped floor drain in another section.

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  • Portable Welder
    replied
    Hey guys, Yes I could still put the radiant heat in the floor and no doubt its the best except in my situation, I like it warm when I'm here and we get times when we are out on a portable for days at a time and when I come home at night I may only be in the shop for a couple hours at night preping stuff for the next day so I think the radiant will work best for my situation.

    SBerry. I also burn wood but am worried about the wood keeping up and there are times when I need it warm in a hurry and 65 degrees is where I like to keep it in the shop when I'm working.

    So you agree with the idea of the heater being over the table.
    I know when the shop is at 65 when we are working and its 20 degrees outside I'll pull the trucks and the hilo in when they have been sitting outside it takes the shop forever to heat back up so I was thinking the table would work in reverse.

    Another note: I have 6 H-beams 12" tall x 30' long that are getting cemented into the floor, 2 inline with the frame of a truck, 2 will be 8' apart inline with the outside edge of a truck and 2 more that will be 3' off the edge of a truck so I will have a area approximately 15' x 30' that will be flat to work off or I can use them to straighten things.
    The new addition will also have 4 bridge cranes, 2 bridges per truck bay.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    There is nothing wrong with radiant heat, going in floor would add a lot of extra cost and a whole new system, radiant tube is simple, hook gas lines and vents in and out, as was mentioned it gives off more heat near the burner I believe. I like it, quick to warm over work areas.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doughboyracer
    replied
    Yep...But might help the next guy.

    Leave a comment:


  • WyoRoy
    replied
    You needn't worry about this old timer popping a bolt, but thanks for caring enough about my health to comment. I'm enjoying the humor. I seem to remember, even with an old timer's memory, that the OP was asking about ceiling radiant heat for a new addition...wait a second, old/new addition with an old/new floor. Mentioning in-floor heat as a missed option appeared to make as little sense then as it does now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doughboyracer
    replied
    A new floor doesn't = RETROFIT.
    But now that his is up and he is just figuring out the heat it IS too late.

    That is why I said in MY OP that he should have come here first...my GOD, take it easy old timer...you are (you're) likely to pop a bolt.

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  • WyoRoy
    replied
    Originally posted by Doughboyracer View Post
    This was NOT a retrofit... It was an addition... which I took to mean NEW addition to existing building. Generally that would mean NEW floor too.
    Sure, probably is a NEW floor...which makes it a R-E-T-R-O-F-I-T if it is already in place. If it isn't, the original poster can add in-floor heat in the new section and keep his old amazingly inefficient hanging forced air furnace in the old section OR swap out that old forced air furnace for a high efficiency radiant tube ceiling heater in that or both sections as he sees fit. I'm just going with what the original poster mentioned about his welding table being located 72' away in the opposite corner when the original building was stated as being 38' X 40'.

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