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log splitter backstop failure, need help w/ fix ideas

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  • log splitter backstop failure, need help w/ fix ideas

    Hi,

    The backstop has deflected approx 1- 1/4" and I need to remedy it. Bracing is needed but where? The backstop is 3/4' of unknown grade.

    The cylinder is a 5" dia. with 2.5'' ram so it's exerting a lot of force. I think the backstop was too high to begin with and along with a powerful cylinder and large wedge was too much.

    I'll bend it back using retracting force and a HEAVY chain but then what?

    I suppose reducing the height of the backstop and making a more efficient wedge that's lower will help keep it from happening again. No, I did not make this. The wedge is sharp.

    ANY ideas would greatly be appreciated.

    *The backstop is 10" high (measured from the top of the i-beam) and 11.5" wide.
    *the wedge is 10" high

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  • #2
    I think you have just demonstrated why most log splitters have a fixed wedge and a flat plate on the ram.

    Weld the wedge to the end of the I-beam and put a flat plate on the ram.

    Tom

    Comment


    • #3
      What you describe is how I prefer to make them. I am looking for a bracing solution as I am tired of spending money.

      Thank You

      Here's how I made my first splitter...
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      Originally posted by flathead4 View Post
      I think you have just demonstrated why most log splitters have a fixed wedge and a flat plate on the ram.

      Weld the wedge to the end of the I-beam and put a flat plate on the ram.

      Tom

      Comment


      • #4
        If you value your time, it would be cheaper to fix it right.

        I assume you have a welder and you are looking for a welding solutuion, so I guess you could try welding some plates perpendicular the back of the backstop. Might be more work than just correcting the design flaw.

        Is that thing on wheels with a hitch? Maybe just use your truck to back it up tight to sturdy tree.

        Tom

        P.S. - I believe your first splitter meets the criteria of the "form follows function" rule. I like it!
        Last edited by flathead4; 03-09-2012, 10:42 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for taking the time to talk to me. I am rather upset about it. Had I just built it the way I wanted to I wouldn't be having this problem- wife intervention gone wrong.

          It's on Harbor freight furniture dollies at the moment (again, sick of spending money) and will never be towable. I don't want to loan it or take it anywhere and it fits VERY nicely into my garage as configured.

          The first splitter was the best but I was forever tripping over it and feared conking my head on the garage floor!

          Here's what she looks like with the power supply... Name:  df17ee01e3102f0617b26b80fc52a862.jpg
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          I haven't made a decision as to how to fix it, ponder, ponder and more ponder

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          • #6
            Weld a plate perpendicular to the back of the flat plate running top to bottom of plate

            Comment


            • #7
              I would but cannot straighten the backplate.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by PortlandGuy View Post
                - wife intervention gone wrong.

                Here's what she looks like with the power supply... Name:  df17ee01e3102f0617b26b80fc52a862.jpg
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                I haven't made a decision as to how to fix it, ponder, ponder and more ponder
                I was expecting to see a pic of your wife and her power supply, as it must be pretty powerful to get you to go against your better judgement and change your intended design.
                To straighten the backstop, try a rosebud torch and a really BFH. Then you can add the reinforcing steel behind it. But your still better off putting the wedge on the beam and the plate on the cylinder like you were going to do it first. Just don't tell the wife until it's done.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by PortlandGuy View Post
                  I would but cannot straighten the backplate.
                  Sheesh, you have a cylinder right there. Loop a chain over the beam and hook it to itself, come out under the plate, behind the plate, over the plate, to the cylinder. Note: at least a 5/16 grade 70 chain, not hardware store chain. Pull back, then hit with a 12# to 24# sledge on the back side. Repeat as many times as necessary. Nothing major wrong with your design, just that the back-plate needs to be stiffer.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Oh, and I'll add, no heat. Unless you want kinks.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      harder to straighten than to bend...

                      and the bigger the ram the weakest is the pull .

                      your cylinder force ratio if 5 inches bore
                      is about 19.63 : 1 @ 2000 psi...19.63 tons pushing

                      if ram is 2.5 inches , substract ram surface = 14.72 :1 @ 2000 psi...14.72 t.pulling

                      (3.1416 x radius square x psi)

                      if unable to straighten you could also gouge it to about 1/2, straighten it and
                      re-weld it, then put reinforcements in the back.

                      good luck.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What if you leave as is and make another wedge to weld to that end ? Not sure what size that is but I used 6''x6''x1/2'' angle with a cutting edge welded to the end of the angle. Works awesome.

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                        • #13
                          I've tried a HEAVY chain and put as much load on it as I dare. It scares the stuffing out of to think of the loads and what would happen if the chain broke. In my attempt I zip tied a 12' 2"x2" board to the spool lever, sheltered behind a wood pile and gave it the juice. The backstop didn't budge and I was glad to have gotten away without additional problems like bodily injury, broken windshield or a hole in my neighbor,s house. Am I being overly cautious?

                          I'll try a bit of all of the suggestions:
                          chain w/ moderate pressure
                          BFH
                          heat

                          Thank you VERY MUCH for the time and thinking!



                          Originally posted by JSFAB View Post
                          Sheesh, you have a cylinder right there. Loop a chain over the beam and hook it to itself, come out under the plate, behind the plate, over the plate, to the cylinder. Note: at least a 5/16 grade 70 chain, not hardware store chain. Pull back, then hit with a 12# to 24# sledge on the back side. Repeat as many times as necessary. Nothing major wrong with your design, just that the back-plate needs to be stiffer.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thank you. The gouging makes perfect sense... if it won't topple with head punches... kick it in the knees.

                            Originally posted by snowbird View Post
                            and the bigger the ram the weakest is the pull .

                            your cylinder force ratio if 5 inches bore
                            is about 19.63 : 1 @ 2000 psi...19.63 tons pushing

                            if ram is 2.5 inches , substract ram surface = 14.72 :1 @ 2000 psi...14.72 t.pulling

                            (3.1416 x radius square x psi)

                            if unable to straighten you could also gouge it to about 1/2, straighten it and
                            re-weld it, then put reinforcements in the back.

                            good luck.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Am I being overly cautious?

                              NO! You are not, better be safe than....whatever else.

                              Take your time, have fun, make it right and when job done contemplate it with satisfaction, that will be the only gratification you might expect.

                              Comment

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