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chain hoist A-frame help

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  • chain hoist A-frame help

    I just ordered a 2 ton chain hoist for lifting heavy things out of the back of my truck, I have some strong tree branches to hook it to but I wanted to build something for it instead, something I can back my truck under, so I can place whatever it is I'm lifting where I want it, I was also thinking about making it collapsable so I can take it with me to load and unload things, maybe a pin or bolt can hold some pieces together so it can be taken down easily and transported, here is a terrible sketch i drew on my Android phone, any help or comments are much appreciated!
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Should give you plenty to look over...

    http://www.google.com/search?um=1&hl...st&btnG=Search

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    • #3
      they are easy to build, but don't expect it to be easily portable. the one I built is technically portable, but its more than a one man job, ****, just adjusting the height is an ordeal.

      Last edited by youfoundtheking; 11-11-2011, 10:47 AM.

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      • #4
        I built one with reciever tubes on each end of the I beam so I can break it down and store it out of the way, can't find any pictures of it right now or I would attach them.

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        • #5
          2 tons? Wide enough to lift a 2-ton item out of your truck? The limiting factor here is the beam spanning the two sides.

          A 100 inch (8 foot, 4 inch) span of wide flange W6-9 (like an I-beam but more stable) will take that load with about 3/16" deflection and peak stress of 18,000 PSI. For ASTM A36 material, this gives a factor of safety of 2 against yield (ASTM A36 material in this section has a minimum yield stress of 36,000 PSI).

          This material weighs 9 pounds per foot. That span is a good 75 pounds without the chain hoist.

          Now for the A-frame design. Instead of an A, make it a complete triangle. Use the same material. Width is all dependent on height. Diagonal gussets at the cross beam to triangle intersection is also a good idea. For a quick take-down, the design becomes more complex.

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          • #6
            I have loaded mine about as much as I wanted to, ha, as I recall we measured it. I had a cobbled up beam and found another one. I raised and spread legs a little, will roll thru 14 door. I like it because although it has a home it can be moved around shop.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by Sberry; 11-12-2011, 03:53 PM.

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            • #7
              Thanks for all the help guys, I have a much better idea of what I'm gonna be building now

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              • #8
                I re-did mine a couple of times over the years. Made the wheels from pipe. When I upgraded the beam it was about 20 ft and I cut it to 18, made it a bit stronger and the fit in the building worked out as good as it could, give enough width that could remove something from a truck and carriage it sideways, set on floor, is wide enough that projects sitting under it that doesnt cause crowding.
                I had 2 beams, used one I should have used another for and had intended on building a different unit that mounted to building post on one end, this I had already and was portable, I really didnt need 2, its liveable in the way and works.
                I built a small one for a Bud, post at wall is for load but hinges on it, the close leg arcs and rotates.
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  Where do I find those rollers that hook to the I beam? Or how can I make one?

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                  • #10
                    Do a search on the web for "I-beam trolly".

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                    • #11
                      I've found craigslist to be a good source of low cost beam trolleys and hoists

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                      • #12
                        Jet

                        http://www.cpojettools.com/jet-troll...efault,sc.html

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                        • #13
                          I'll probaby just end up making a trolley, those suckers are pricey!

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                          • #14
                            The manual 2 ton from Jet is 129$, if someone gives you the materials and your time is worth about a dollar an hour it would be practical to make one.

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                            • #15
                              I can get the materials pretty easily, and time isn't really an issue, it would be better than spending a hundred bucks, and give me a little project to work on

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