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Flashback arrestors, what to use.

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  • Flashback arrestors, what to use.

    Hi and thanks for taking the time...

    I don't do too much torch work, but I do have a portable set that really comes in handy. I have often thought to add flashback arrestors or backflow valves. I assume the arrestors at the torch handle would add the greatest margin of safety but may be clumsy with the added couple inches to the overall torch length, especially when the idea is to have a small compact torch. Are the regulator mounted ones adequate?

    I do try to practice safe handling, lighting, purging but because I do not use the set often I always need to check back for correct pressure settings etc. and I think the extra safety would be smart.

    Can you guys with the hands on experience let me know what makes the most practical sense for my limited use.

    Learning something new here everyday.

    Thanks

    John

  • #2
    John I use a Victor with checks on the torch and flash backs at the regs....the reason I like flashbacks at the reg is what if a hose gets cut....the gas will burn....I sure don't want it getting into that 2000 psi oxy cylinder

    Comment


    • #3
      Same hear, all of our torches at school have arrestors on the regs and the the torches. Gives you some peace of mind when numbnuts is "learning" how to use the torch.

      They are a little bit more awkward to have on the torch handle, but I don't notice a huge difference. Using a smaller hose for the last few feet near the torch handle would make a much more noticable difference/improvement, and wouldn't compromise safety.

      Comment


      • #4
        numbnuts...

        Haha sometimes I feel like numbnuts when I have to dust off the torch after maybe a year. Like anything else that you use daily it becomes second nature; when you don't do it, you need to think each step through. When safety is envolved but to be safe than sorry.

        Thanks for your input. Not sure I understand though. Use an arrestor on both the torch and regulator or check valve at torch and arrestor at regulator? Also, does the torch respond differently, meaning require different fuel reg & O2 settings?

        Lastly, Shorerider, couldn't help but notice your radical mountain bike picture. Since your a senior member I'm guessing your not 16. I'm a 47yo general contractor and I love my mountain bikes ever fab any parts or frames?

        Thanks,

        John

        Comment


        • #5
          Do they require pressure adjustment?

          Comment


          • #6
            You can have flash backs at both the torch and the regs.....that to me is overkill....to each his own.....I use check valves at the torch....gas goes one way only.....and the flash backs at the regs in case I cut a hose or get a fire in them.....it will stop at the regs....if you only have flash backs at the torch and you cut a hose....well I hope you see it and turn the tank off or run like ****......

            Comment


            • #7
              flashbacks

              put on both the gauge and the torch...i have seen one time and i have no idea what caused it to act that way but a hose blow after a back fire in a shop that caused an acc hose to pop a hole at almost exactly 12 inch spaces from the torch to the bottles ( a hundred foot hose)
              luckily there were flash backs at the gauges...that ruined a hose and the boss made new rules!...i dont think it could (or should) be called overkill

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Handy560 View Post
                Haha sometimes I feel like numbnuts when I have to dust off the torch after maybe a year. Like anything else that you use daily it becomes second nature; when you don't do it, you need to think each step through. When safety is envolved but to be safe than sorry.

                Thanks for your input. Not sure I understand though. Use an arrestor on both the torch and regulator or check valve at torch and arrestor at regulator? Also, does the torch respond differently, meaning require different fuel reg & O2 settings?

                Lastly, Shorerider, couldn't help but notice your radical mountain bike picture. Since your a senior member I'm guessing your not 16. I'm a 47yo general contractor and I love my mountain bikes ever fab any parts or frames?

                Thanks,

                John
                On any of the torches I have used the regulator settings have always been the same with flashback arrestors as without. I think the others have described pretty well why this is a good idea.

                Actually I'll be 18 in a couple of weeks, but you can never be too young or old to ride. I have been riding for around 5 years now, and am as addicted as ever. Summers are basically work all week, and ride all weekend. I've never actaully built anything for any of my bikes yet, althought if I had access to the the heat treating facitilties I think it would be pretty sweet to build a custom frame. Once I get a few more tools, (power of course) I've got a few ideas, but as par usual I've got more ideas than money.

                Comment


                • #9
                  flashback arrestors

                  I've always used them at the regulator. One thing i never do is pull more hose than needed so it wont be gathered up at my feet waiting for me to do something stupid. One thing I did with my bike was to add a 100 watt hallogen driving light to the handle bars. I powered it with 12 sub c rechargable batteries and a momentary contact swich to turn it on.
                  It only gave about 20 minutes of run time but if used spairingly it was awsome. Riding on the sidewalk at night cars would flash high beams.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wow!

                    Wow! Those arrestors are expensive... of course not as bad as blowing a hole in the side of my house, but I was supprised at the cost relative to say a nice torch set...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 84ZMike View Post
                      John I use a Victor with checks on the torch and flash backs at the regs....the reason I like flashbacks at the reg is what if a hose gets cut....the gas will burn....I sure don't want it getting into that 2000 psi oxy cylinder
                      Ever heard of the fire triangle Mike? How much fuel is inside that 2000psi Oxygen cylinder? Dee dee dee

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Fishy Jim View Post
                        Ever heard of the fire triangle Mike? How much fuel is inside that 2000psi Oxygen cylinder? Dee dee dee
                        So you searched my post and this is the best you could do........ and if you could read you would see that I use checks at the torch....and flash backs on the regs....so unless you turn the torch loose on the regs the fire isn't getting into the tanks......keep on searching and hopefully you will find something you can twist around to help your ego ....dumb a$$

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          See, right there you proved you don't understand the simplest of fire principles. You need fuel AND oxygen to have a fire.

                          1)Inside your little O2 tank has a specific lack of fuel.

                          2)Inside your Acetylene tank, there's a very big lack of O2.

                          Now please explain why you have arrestors on your regulators?

                          Even if you took a hatchet and chopped both hoses and lit the end, you still wouldn't have any more flame than you did at the end of your torch besides some burning rubber. It's not like the fire is going to go shooting up the hose (see 1&2 above).

                          Now if you went cutting into your O2 tank, you might raise the temp high enough to burn the cylinder itself as fuel, but those arrestors wouldn't do you much good at that point.

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                          • #14
                            Correct as long as there is pressure in the tank the fire will stay on the out side burning at the rate the regs let it.....the problem is I like to run my tanks empty before I swap them....(not acetylene as I run LP)....so if I was to cut a hose and the tank was on it's last drop well not a good thing......so if you only use flashbacks at the torch then you run the risk of fire burning back to the reg. then that 2000 psi will be burning as well as propelling your tank....hopeful for the rest of us you will be the only one injured

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              So let me get this straight -

                              You run your tank empty, and when empty the flame might finally burn back into the tank (where there is no fuel, and your O2 on its own will not burn itself) and this is going to make a BOOM how?

                              Same thing with your LP. Your tank burns down to 0psi and is now empty enough to swap out. Somewhere along the line this still has enough oxygen INSIDE the tank (how did the O2 get in there?) to go BOOM when it no longer has any psi...

                              Neither situation works.

                              You're a genius.

                              Comment

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