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  • Future Plans

    Hey guys,

    As some of you may already know, I'm a senior in high school and ready for graduation. And like some seniors, I haven't decided what I want to do after high school. I was thinking of goin into the oilfield and working as a roustabout or roughneck on a drilling rig, but alot of people are trying to convince me to take my welding talent and make a career out of it. There is a vo-tech in Woodward, which is 30 miles from where I currently live. The guy I work with over there lives 2 miles down the road from the school and said I could live there with him. I haven't made up my mind yet but this sounds like a good deal. What are your opinions on this?
    At Home
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    1976 AMC Jeep CJ7
    1980 Ford F150 Custom
    1994 Chevrolet Silverado C1500

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    Miller Dialarc 250 AC/DC

    Lincoln Idealarc 250 AC/DC
    Snap-On Flux Core Welding Machine

    Hypertherm Plasma Cutter
    Victor Torches

    2006 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD 4x4

    Proud American Ham KE5TJA

  • #2
    your whole world of success will depend on how well you get along with your roomy. it's hard to study when people are loud, partying etc. If you think that end of the chapter will be ok, then I would do it. while you still can. take the opportunity ......................you won't regret it. most people can go out and make good money, but not all people can become a good qualified craftsman.
    Syncro250DX Tigrunner
    Victor set
    Elite auto-helmet
    Dewalt Bench grinder
    Mastercraft miter saw
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    Toothbrush
    pencil
    toilet paper

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    • #3
      Go Army. Sign up as a weldor.
      The post service education benefits will send you through college.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Dustyhaze75 View Post
        your whole world of success will depend on how well you get along with your roomy. it's hard to study when people are loud, partying etc. If you think that end of the chapter will be ok, then I would do it. while you still can. take the opportunity ......................you won't regret it. most people can go out and make good money, but not all people can become a good qualified craftsman.
        I don't think I have to worry much about Larry bein loud and partyin. He's an older guy and after we come in from the shop, he usually sacks out in his recliner, leaving me to watch TV, work on my truck, study, whatever I need to do. I've talked to a couple people from the vo-tech, as well as our school counselor, and they are getting me some applications for scholarships, grants, and the like.

        Go Army. Sign up as a weldor.
        The post service education benefits will send you through college.
        I had thought of this, but prefer the way I'm goin now. However, the Navy recruiter is comin tonight to talk about sending me to welding school, I'll listen to him and then weigh my options.
        At Home
        Miller Thunderbolt XL AC/DC
        Performance Tools 6" Bench Grinder
        Craftsman Hand Tools
        Craftsman Cordless Drills

        DeWalt Angle Grinder
        1976 AMC Jeep CJ7
        1980 Ford F150 Custom
        1994 Chevrolet Silverado C1500

        At Work
        Miller Bobcat 250
        2 Miller MM251s
        2 Miller MM252s
        Miller Dialarc 250 AC/DC

        Lincoln Idealarc 250 AC/DC
        Snap-On Flux Core Welding Machine

        Hypertherm Plasma Cutter
        Victor Torches

        2006 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD 4x4

        Proud American Ham KE5TJA

        Comment


        • #5
          Great Idea

          Going to the vo-tech and furthering your skills is a great idea if you can swing it. You'll gain skills that will set you apart from the un-skilled labor pool, and you'll be setting yourself up on a career path that could last you the rest of your life.

          I'm also betting that you'll really enjoy the classes at the vo-tech. Who wouldn't enjoy some quality time under the helmet really honing their skills? Go for it!

          Comment


          • #6
            opinion

            Originally posted by AnotherDano View Post
            Go Army. Sign up as a weldor.
            The post service education benefits will send you through college.
            I have to say I agree with this man. My army time was as a recon scout which has its uses but those boys overseas could sure use a good welder. I sleep alot better knowing good craftsmen are taking care of our boys and getting more education as well as REAL WORLD experience! You dont get broke down physically like I am if your a welder while in the army, they dont have to run nearly as much as recon does...Not to mention afterwards you will always feel that warm spot that tells you you did the right thing. Nothing like standing in a crowd when someone asks for a veteran to raise their hand and seeing each hand raised, and a face attached to it. Thats when you see proud people who know that the price of freedom isnt free.

            Comment


            • #7
              what to do

              Wow senior in high school, I sort of remember those days. It took me 10 years after high school to decide what I wanted to be when I grew up. Now today at 38 I can't imagine loving my job more. I only wish I had decided earlier. Now as you finish you high school life the real stuff is coming up and what a great time in life, so much is out there just waiting to be done and you have the opportunity to do it.

              Sure the oilfield is good money right now even as a roustabout. I know a couple of older ones and they loved their jobs, the opportunity to travel some and work hard all come with hard partying. But let's take a look 10 to 15 years from now. How much talk is going into alternative sources of energy. Alot.

              I would even say along with Steven Covey that the manufacturing jobs will become less and less as we develop new technologies and streamline our manufacturing processes. Will we always need people doing those jobs? yea I think so but not so many and it is going to be devastating for those not prepared for it. Look at how much we automate, we are even writing software that can learn.

              Even forums like this are here so we can share information quickly. Who has to go find a weld instructor when you can post pictures and have others look at them on line? Is it the right way? Sometimes.

              My point and sorry for being so long winded about it is to find what you like about welding and learn as much as you can cram into your head, find out what heat does to metals and how to control dilution ratios and so much more. The need for this type of information is becoming critical in our new world environment. I don't think it will be to long before we will see different types of job competition that we have never imagined, at least publicly. To get a glimpse of it dig through this and other forums to find what is happening in Canada and the gulf coast region where the competition is becoming more challenging.

              We are entering an age where the flow of information and knowledge is the focus, as a society we are evolving into something else. Just like society went from hunter gatherer to farming and from farming to manufacturing. We are growing into our next evolutionary step as a society. Our world is getting smaller and we are seeing borders fading as information is transmitted around the world freely.

              So take a look ahead and see where you want to be, what you want to do. The opportunities are endless and the prepared welder will be the successful welder. The jobs are there, the kicker is we have to be willing to do what it takes to get them.

              I know some of this if not all of it is going to stir some controversy. I don't intend it to but even within myself as I think about it and write it my own emotions are challenged. So take it for what it is, an opinion from a point of view. One point in millions.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by diamondback View Post
                Wow senior in high school, I sort of remember those days. It took me 10 years after high school to decide what I wanted to be when I grew up. Now today at 38 I can't imagine loving my job more. I only wish I had decided earlier. Now as you finish you high school life the real stuff is coming up and what a great time in life, so much is out there just waiting to be done and you have the opportunity to do it.

                Sure the oilfield is good money right now even as a roustabout. I know a couple of older ones and they loved their jobs, the opportunity to travel some and work hard all come with hard partying. But let's take a look 10 to 15 years from now. How much talk is going into alternative sources of energy. Alot.

                I would even say along with Steven Covey that the manufacturing jobs will become less and less as we develop new technologies and streamline our manufacturing processes. Will we always need people doing those jobs? yea I think so but not so many and it is going to be devastating for those not prepared for it. Look at how much we automate, we are even writing software that can learn.

                Even forums like this are here so we can share information quickly. Who has to go find a weld instructor when you can post pictures and have others look at them on line? Is it the right way? Sometimes.

                My point and sorry for being so long winded about it is to find what you like about welding and learn as much as you can cram into your head, find out what heat does to metals and how to control dilution ratios and so much more. The need for this type of information is becoming critical in our new world environment. I don't think it will be to long before we will see different types of job competition that we have never imagined, at least publicly. To get a glimpse of it dig through this and other forums to find what is happening in Canada and the gulf coast region where the competition is becoming more challenging.

                We are entering an age where the flow of information and knowledge is the focus, as a society we are evolving into something else. Just like society went from hunter gatherer to farming and from farming to manufacturing. We are growing into our next evolutionary step as a society. Our world is getting smaller and we are seeing borders fading as information is transmitted around the world freely.

                So take a look ahead and see where you want to be, what you want to do. The opportunities are endless and the prepared welder will be the successful welder. The jobs are there, the kicker is we have to be willing to do what it takes to get them.

                I know some of this if not all of it is going to stir some controversy. I don't intend it to but even within myself as I think about it and write it my own emotions are challenged. So take it for what it is, an opinion from a point of view. One point in millions.


                Controversy or not he makes a very good point.....

                Comment


                • #9
                  The Navy recruiter came by last night and talked to me about welding programs in the Navy. After 2 hours of discussion, I've decided to sign on with them as a weldor, more specifically a SeaBee. I go back to Hooker on Monday to have my parents sign the papers, then go to Oklahoma City on Tuesday for my physical and paperwork on Wednesday. Provided I pass my physical, the job is guaranteed
                  At Home
                  Miller Thunderbolt XL AC/DC
                  Performance Tools 6" Bench Grinder
                  Craftsman Hand Tools
                  Craftsman Cordless Drills

                  DeWalt Angle Grinder
                  1976 AMC Jeep CJ7
                  1980 Ford F150 Custom
                  1994 Chevrolet Silverado C1500

                  At Work
                  Miller Bobcat 250
                  2 Miller MM251s
                  2 Miller MM252s
                  Miller Dialarc 250 AC/DC

                  Lincoln Idealarc 250 AC/DC
                  Snap-On Flux Core Welding Machine

                  Hypertherm Plasma Cutter
                  Victor Torches

                  2006 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD 4x4

                  Proud American Ham KE5TJA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Congrats.

                    Well congratulations hope you pass your physical... I'm Graduating next year from high school.... I can't wait... I want to be a weldor I hope it works out for you in the long run

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My cousin joined the Navy, guaranteed to be on an aircraft carrier, spent 4 years in Reno, Nevada (desert). Only time he saw the ocean was on leave.
                      Good luck, you have a needed craft, use it.
                      Tim Beeker,
                      T-N-J Industries
                      (my side bussiness)

                      Miller Synchrowave 350LX with tigrunner
                      Esab 450i with wire feeder
                      HH135 mig
                      Thermal Dynamics cutmaster 51 plasma cutter
                      Miller aircrafter 330 - sold
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                      vertical and horizontal band saws
                      table saw
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                      Sand blast cabinet
                      lots of hand grinders
                      Harris torch
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                      • #12
                        good choice

                        Don't forget to tell the people in the service you come in contact with thanks from all of us. We never forget them! And thank you, you'll do well.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          futuer plans

                          Well bryce it seems as always you get different opinions from all kinds of guys on this site & I'm not KNOCKING ANYONE with the info given but its all up to you in the end and what you feel good about doing and where you want to be in 10-15yrs with you skill as a weldor?

                          If you have the chance to take classe's to gain more knowledge then do it, also if you have a chance to serve in the service's for the good of our country then by all means sign up and do the best to your skills and be proud of it(send-post pics) I think I might be able to speack for all of us here on the site by saying it would be an honor to see a up and coming weldor to do a service to our country and be proud of it and know we would support you all the way just be sure of what you really want and then DO IT.
                          Syncrowave 250/Coolmate-3-(home)
                          RMS-14 (kisser button)-(home)
                          Craftmans/S-K tools-(home)
                          Grizzly 16" vert band saw-(home)
                          DeWalt chop saw-(home)
                          Craftsman 4"-7" hand grinders
                          Lincoln 225 arc welder
                          Lots of vise clamps(not enough)
                          assortment bar clamps

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                          • #14
                            Having served as an enlisted man in the Navy myself (1972-1976) I can say from my experience it was the best thing I ever did for myself. By about halfway through my hitch, I knew beyond a shadow of a doubt what direction I was going to take in life; when I got out I had both the desire and the discipline to stay focused and stay on course. The training, experience and responsibility that the Navy gave me have served me well to this day. It was not always a smooth ride...for me the transition from being a civilian to being a serviceman probably took longer than for most. But I finally made it through the wickets; and thank my lucky stars. Most of the guys I served with would say the same thing...they went on to college, or started successful businesses, became doctors, bankers, you name it. The thing we all had in common after the Navy was that we all had learned that whatever we put our hands to do, if we gave it everything we had, we would be successful. In a sense, our service helped us become winners in the game of life.

                            I took advantage of the GI Bill and earned a degree in Mechanical Engineering in the first four years after I got out, graduating first in my class at major SEC university, and debt-free as well. Not because I was any smarter than the rest - but because I had learned to stay focused on the important things and stay on task for however long it took. I graduated in 1981, and haven't been unemployed since - not once, ever. I know for a fact that the character change that took place in me while I was in the Navy made this success possible.

                            I salute you, I know you've made a wise decision. Don't ever doubt it or second-guess yourself about it. Just do it.
                            Bob

                            That that is is that that is not is not.

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                            • #15
                              I worked in the oil fields for 15 years, drilled off shore, I traveled the world punching holes in the ground, fishing out drilling string, it was fun and ventures,
                              But I was a kid then.
                              Being a Roustabout you will probably spend about 3 or 4 months hard physical labor. If youre lucky within that year you will be able to work on the drilling floor, racking pipe or throw-in toungs. Drilling rigs always need welders. One reason were called rough necks was, we would break it and the welders would fix it. They are always in need of welders. Vocational schooling would be good. Get your certification. There are companies out there, ARB, Arizona Pipeline, Dotty Brothers, just to name a few. These companies sometimes chase oil and gas lines for 20 miles. That is a lot of welding. They are always in need of welders. Within a couple years of working you will be able to get your own rig and work for yourself.
                              Good luck with your decision

                              Robert
                              Fab Tech

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