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  • jokers10
    started a topic Steel strength question

    Steel strength question

    I am new to the welding hobby. I have had my MM 211 for a couple of weeks now, and just got through building some angle iron horses so I don't always have to work from the floor.

    One of the main reasons I wanted my own welder was so I could build my garage furniture so I can actually create enough space to work comfortably in and occasionally park my truck in it.

    I have drawn out plans for a shelf system that is 7' wide, 18" deep, and about 6' high. I am wanting to use 1.5 inch square tubing with a 14 gauge wall. The way I have designed it, I would build four shelves 7'x18" and separate them with 17.5" tubes. I would not have a bottom shelf, but cut some plate for the feet to stabilize it a little more. I will be using 3/4" plywood for the shelves attached with screws with welded on tabs.

    My concern is how much weight it will hold before I start seeing bowing in the shelves, and if I should be bracing the shelves at the center point as well. I won't be putting massive items on the shelves, but I am curious to what it's limitations would be. I might be moving into a larger place and would carry the design over if this one works out.

  • jokers10
    replied
    And, it's done

    Well I finished it up last night. It fits perfectly in the hole I designed it for. See below for the final few pictures.

    The first one is the test fit of the wood I cut. I got the wood for free, and might eventually replace it if needed in the future. It is fiberboard.
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    This is a picture after the first coat of paint. Safety blue just happened to be the cheapest.
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    This is the shelf in it's final resting place. It feels pretty stable and should be more stable the more weight I add down low. If I feel it isn't secure enough, I will weld on a standoff from the wall and secure it to the wall with some lag bolts.
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    This is a shot of under the shelf of the tabs I welded in to hold the wood down. Not really needed, but I wanted to see how it was done. Also it keeps the wood from lifting off the shelf due to moisture in the atmosphere.
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    Thanks for all inputs, and those that followed the project. Up next is either my work bench or my welding cart, or both if I can figure out how to get full size tubes to my house. I drive a 12 foot truck and the tubes are 24 foot full length. Heck, I don't know if my garage is that big.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doughboyracer
    replied
    Another good idea for doing it that way...

    You could put one size smaller tube stubs on the bottom of each "section" and make it expandable. The height of each section would be a bit taller buy itself but that would be minor...cheers and nice shelves. I will like to see it with the wood on it. (I am not trying to nit-pick your project, more giving others ideas about what they might do different.)

    Leave a comment:


  • jokers10
    replied
    To me it seemed easier to design it the way I did. Also I had no clue how much this thing would end up weighing. Once I got done putting the legs on the first shelf, I just weighed that section and multiplied it by 4. I have over 130 lbs of steel. Still light enough to move, but heavy enough to not worry about strength any more.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doughboyracer
    replied
    That's a MM211 for those paying attention...

    I do get it, but why waist so much time on one project when there are sooooo many that are available?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bistineau
    replied
    Originally posted by Doughboyracer View Post
    ...but why the extra cutting and welding? Full length legs would have reduced your work a ton...and save yourself from more work but skipping the tabs and notch the wood. Secure it if you must with self tapping flat head 1/4" screws into the tubes. I would have (and did) use 2" x 2" x 1/8" angle for it all. that will hold anything I can lift up on it.
    By doing it this way the load of each shelf is supported directly by the leg section underneath. If he had made full length legs, the load of each shelf would have been supported by the welds themselves. The welds in this case just keeps everything lined up where it needs to be. He also gets more hood time to play with his new MM210.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doughboyracer
    replied
    Well that's one way to do it...

    ...but why the extra cutting and welding? Full length legs would have reduced your work a ton...and save yourself from more work but skipping the tabs and notch the wood. Secure it if you must with self tapping flat head 1/4" screws into the tubes. I would have (and did) use 2" x 2" x 1/8" angle for it all. that will hold anything I can lift up on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • jokers10
    replied
    It is now mostly done. I need to weld on the tabs to secure the wood shelves, weld on some plate feet to make it easier to level, weld on the wall stand-offs, with lag bolt tabs to secure it to the wall so it won't tip, and then add some paint, before finally screwing down the wood.

    In the last picture you can see the mess I am trying to organize. It will go in the spot where the 2 flimsy shelves are located, and what doesn't fit on this shelf, or have a spot on my future work bench or welding table, will find a home in someone else's home, or the dumpster.

    At that point I will have enough space to work and not trip over extra truck parts, and christmas decorations.
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  • jokers10
    replied
    I started cutting the steel tonight. Going to get everything prepped, and laid out so I can start welding first thing Saturday morning. It was 108 degrees out there this evening. Pictures to come once I get something worth taking a picture of.

    Leave a comment:


  • jokers10
    replied
    Yeah the tabs are just to secure the wood to the tubing. The wood will be sitting on the tubing. I will be picking up the metal on monday, and hopefully my new digital elite helmet will be here early next week as well.

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  • Broccoli1
    replied
    yeah could be that way also- dunno, no drawerings

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  • FernTJ
    replied
    Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
    From what I'm reading the Plywood is not sitting on top of the 1.5 square tube
    beam

    ..the Weld tab is going to be carrying the load of the 18" x 7' 3/4" Plywood and also the sheite ya shove on the shelf.



    I assume you are using Weld tabs so that the wood sits flush with the 1-1/4" steel, for Aesthetics
    My assumption was that the wood was on top of the tubes and that the tabs were on the back side of the tube flush with the top so that screws could go through the tab rather than through the tube. A lot of furniture is constructed like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • BD1
    replied
    hi,just look at the shelving inits they sell at menards, lowes, or home depot. they are tooth pick material and have load ratings that scare me. you can even check out the pallet shelving ratings for a closer look.i would just make sure you run the plywood grain in the right direction.good luck, bob

    Leave a comment:


  • 1havnfun
    replied
    While you are calculating
    Substitute 1" x 2" x 11ga rect tube.

    84" x 18" shelf, bet you get to 500lbs/shelf pretty easy.
    That is equally loaded as all shelf systems state
    Assemble the rect tube 2" tall
    You might be able to save some $ and use 1/2" plywood.

    Cost... almost the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • Broccoli1
    replied
    From what I'm reading the Plywood is not sitting on top of the 1.5 square tube
    beam

    ..the Weld tab is going to be carrying the load of the 18" x 7' 3/4" Plywood and also the sheite ya shove on the shelf.



    I assume you are using Weld tabs so that the wood sits flush with the 1-1/4" steel, for Aesthetics

    Leave a comment:

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