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Passport Pro and 16 gauge aluminum?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Craig in Denver View Post
    These guys love pictures, when you start blowing holes, post pics.
    I will definitely post a photo or two of my early weld attempts, but you guys have to promise not to be jealous of my immediate mastery over the process!

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    • #32
      Should a 40 cubic foot argon tank last me a while?

      Also, do I need a metal welding table or can I use almost anything if I throw a sheet of metal on top and/or a cover it with a high quality welding blanket?

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      • #33
        a metal table would be best but a sheet of metal over a wooden one would be ok if you add some washers or spacers to keep the steel off the wood. a little air space will keep the table from lighting on fire.
        a 40 will go fast, more so in the learning stage. i would recommend at least a 80, a 125 is still small enough to move around without any trouble. an 80 is essayer. also the larger the tank the cheaper the gas is as the largest part of a fill bill is service. ask your dealer about fill prices and you will see the big advantage to a larger tank.
        thanks for the help
        ......or..........
        hope i helped
        sigpic
        feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
        summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
        JAMES

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        • #34
          I've found a sense of humor fits in everywhere in life.

          "but you guys have to promise not to be jealous of my immediate mastery over the process!"
          I promise: "If you pull this off, I WILL hate you."
          My earlier 'good luck' was not meant to include immediate success.

          My tank is 51" to the top, including valve. I don't have a clue what CF that is, don't remember. It's not very portable but if you don't need portability, bigger is better (like fun4now said). This doesn't include the hastle of running out mid project (Sunday afternoon) and vechicle travel time at $3 a gallon. Someone else said, "If they can't get it to my shop, I don't weld it."

          "Also, do I need a metal welding table or can I use almost anything "
          Sometimes, I sit on a wood box and weld on a milk crate. Not so obvious tip: it's not just a 'foot' pedal. If I have to sit on the floor, I put the pedal under my bent knee, etc.
          RETIRED desk jockey.

          Hobby weldor with a little training.

          Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

          Miller Syncrowave 250.
          sigpic

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          • #35
            i have a 12"X48"X1/2" plate i use when i'm not at my welding table but need a table (other shop or yard, my table is about 1,000 lbs) i have a 80qft tank and a 125qft tank. taking into account its 100mil. round trip to fill i wish i had more.
            thanks for the help
            ......or..........
            hope i helped
            sigpic
            feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
            summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
            JAMES

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Craig in Denver View Post
              I promise: "If you pull this off, I WILL hate you."
              I can live with that.

              OK. I'm thinking I'll start with an 80CF cylinder then. I believe those are around 3 feet tall which is within reason of portability. If I find it consistantly runs out too fast, I'll buy another 80 CF. Then I'll have one full when the other runs out which gives me flexibility on when I get the refill.

              Which I guess leads the question a little... is there a way to tell when a cylinder is about to run out? Or do you just have to risk running out in the middle of a weld and screwing it up?

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by fun4now View Post
                i have a 12"X48"X1/2" plate i use when i'm not at my welding table but need a table
                That thing must weigh a bit all by itself. Is it stainless steel? I'm just thinking that if I work with aluminum, I'd want a stainless steel surface I guess?

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                • #38
                  yep, its not light. no its not SS that would be nice.
                  80qft tank is about 36" 125 is about 45" both about 7-8" Di.
                  thanks for the help
                  ......or..........
                  hope i helped
                  sigpic
                  feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                  summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                  JAMES

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    "is there a way to tell when a cylinder is about to run out? Or do you just have to risk running out in the middle of a weld and screwing it up?"

                    Well, the 125CF bottle (thx fun4now) comes full at about 2000lbs. The gauge is ok down to the last 100lbs or so. Maybe you've got 20" to 30" of welding left (just guessing). Then it's kinda just luck. You don't need much pressure to run 15-20cfh.

                    Since I only weld brackets, widgets and gizmos; I weld till I can't. You'll know. An early symptom is a black/blue tungsten from lack of post flow. Besides, it's a welder; change bottles, grind it out and fix it. Welding gives you that option, too cool. With a welder and grinder, it's hard to screw it up. Heat exchangers excluded.

                    Oh, arc length should be about 1/8", sorta tricky when you're poking the filler rod around in there.

                    PS When I started TIG, I watched the pro at the motorcycle shop using 1/16" rod. He made it look easy (sound familiar?). I spent many hours throwing my torch at the garage door, until I tried 3/32". Holy cwap, what a difference! That day, I said to myself; "Hey, I can weld aluminum!"
                    Last edited by Craig in Denver; 01-30-2008, 09:50 PM. Reason: Added PS
                    RETIRED desk jockey.

                    Hobby weldor with a little training.

                    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

                    Miller Syncrowave 250.
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I just placed an order for a TA185 from IOC. Woot.

                      Originally posted by Craig in Denver View Post
                      PS When I started TIG, I watched the pro at the motorcycle shop using 1/16" rod. He made it look easy (sound familiar?). I spent many hours throwing my torch at the garage door, until I tried 3/32". Holy cwap, what a difference! That day, I said to myself; "Hey, I can weld aluminum!"
                      I also ordered some 1/16" aluminum rod since it matches roughly what I will be tinkering with. Maybe I should also pick up some 3/32" it sounds like? Why would the 3/32" be easier to weld with than the 1/16"?

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                      • #41
                        aluminum seems to eat up the filler. its less a dip and more of a push in some. i keep 3/32 and 1/8" the 3/32 is my fav.
                        for realy little stuff i have some aluminum MIG wire.
                        thanks for the help
                        ......or..........
                        hope i helped
                        sigpic
                        feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                        summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                        JAMES

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          do your best to keep it coverd also. from what i have heard the thing is packed way to full to be popping open to blow out. a cover will drastically reduce the amount of crap to accumulate inside it. just look at all the junk in the air wile grinding and sanding. after the first time i opened my MM135 to blow it out i started using a cover and it made a huge difference keeping it coverd when not in use.
                          i'm planing on mt TA's 2nd or 3rd birth day (with me) to take it in to have it cleaned out by the service guys. to much $$ invested to risk a bo-bo over a $60 service fee.
                          thanks for the help
                          ......or..........
                          hope i helped
                          sigpic
                          feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                          summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                          JAMES

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by fun4now View Post
                            do your best to keep it coverd also.
                            Roger wilco. Sounds like good advice. Thanks.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              i like to keep my filler the same size as my tung. or close
                              you will find the 3/32 to be the most used size in tung. as such 3/32" & 1/8" filler are most often used. however in a pinch use what ya have. i have twisted several pieces of the MIG wire together to get a size that worked when out of 3/32" filler. gotta do what ya gotta do.
                              thanks for the help
                              ......or..........
                              hope i helped
                              sigpic
                              feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                              summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                              JAMES

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by root View Post
                                I also ordered some 1/16" aluminum rod since it matches roughly what I will be tinkering with. Maybe I should also pick up some 3/32" it sounds like? Why would the 3/32" be easier to weld with than the 1/16"?
                                The idea in TIG is to melt a puddle, then dip your filler in that puddle. Dip, dip, dip, dip at about 1/2 second intervals. At my skill level, 1/16" rod will melt before you get it to the puddle. And by the time this happens, you'll have a melted hole in your 16ga. 3/32" has the mass to last long enough to get to the puddle. Don't forget, your arc length is only 1/8", this is very tight quarters. You're holding the rod about 8" to 10" from the end, it's wobbling and you've got an 1/8" target you're poking at (NOT THE ARC, next to it in the puddle). And, with every poke, your rod gets shorter. If ya poke the tungsten, guit, you're done. Nothing gets hurt, but the alum rod wicks onto the tung, turns your arc green, flashes a big black poof and contaminates any further weld. Regrind the tung to remove the alum blob, clean the 5" circle of ugly black soot off your project, and continue. Hand grinding is just fine, you don't need anything special. I use a 6" grinder with a fine regular wheel. A bench belt sander works too.

                                OK, yer into me for $500. This is fun. How many more questions ya got??
                                RETIRED desk jockey.

                                Hobby weldor with a little training.

                                Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

                                Miller Syncrowave 250.
                                sigpic

                                Comment

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