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Passport Pro and 16 gauge aluminum?

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  • #16
    Just when I think I've decide on the TA, you give the Passport a plug. If they find me babbling in a corner, I hope you feel sorry.

    LOL i been there done that.
    i really was not trying to drive ya nuts, its a hard choice. and with $ tight its even harder. if you are going to be doing it to make some $$ its not so bad as you can always make the $$ with one to get the other later and have both.
    sounds like Danny put in the deciding vote for ya. i have never MIG welded aluminum so cant say how well it will go. most of the work you are doing dose normally get done with TIG . so may just be best for you to just learn the TIG .

    yes the TA-185 has pulse (i saw that one coming)
    the receptacle for the plug is like $12-$15 and having 240V in the shop is always a good thing. soon you will be adding a real air compressor and you will need 240V for that too.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped
    sigpic
    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

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    • #17
      PLEASE don't take this wrong. I'm new on here and don't want to get evicted.

      You said you've never welded before and it doesn't look that hard and you want to start with 16ga aluminum.

      IT IS HARD. So don't think it just happens. You also said you don't have much time, it's all about time.

      I just don't want you to think you can buy a welder (even a $4000 tig) and start welding 16ga alum. You're setting yourself up for failure.

      If you have someone to show you the tricks, maybe. But with no instruction, you have a long uphill road ahead.

      I'll soon add my signature which will say I'm a hobby welder. And I'm new enough to remember how hard it was to learn on my own. I have a Miller Syncrowave 250 that took me a long time to get 'ok' with.

      I guess I'd rather hurt you now than mislead ya.
      Last edited by Craig in Denver; 01-28-2008, 10:01 PM. Reason: I can't beleive I misspelled "Syncrowave".
      RETIRED desk jockey.

      Hobby weldor with a little training.

      Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

      Miller Syncrowave 250.
      sigpic

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      • #18
        I'd have to agree with Craig, you have a long road ahead, it's gonna take time and practice. Don't get us wrong it can be done, but will take time to do well.
        at home:
        2012 325 Trailblazer EFI with Excel power
        2007 302 Trailblazer with the Robin SOLD
        2008 Suitcase 12RC
        Spoolmatic 30A
        WC-24
        2009 Dynasty 200DX
        2000 XMT 304
        2008 Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
        Sold:MM130XP
        Sold:MM 251
        Sold:CST 280

        at work:
        Invision 350MP
        Dynasty 350
        Millermatic 350P
        Retired:Shopmaster 300 with a HF-251

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        • #19
          Originally posted by fun4now View Post
          soon you will be adding a real air compressor and you will need 240V for that too.
          Hehe. Funny you should mention "a real air compressor" as that is one of those things I bought to cover my then current need and have since discovered I should have bought a little more. I thought I was being a smart shopper only to later realize my mistake.

          Don't worry, I know I will likely suck beyond all expectations when I start. I'm not so full of myself to expect otherwise. Almost.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by root View Post
            Hehe. Funny you should mention "a real air compressor" as that is one of those things I bought to cover my then current need and have since discovered I should have bought a little more. I thought I was being a smart shopper only to later realize my mistake.

            Don't worry, I know I will likely suck beyond all expectations when I start. I'm not so full of myself to expect otherwise. Almost.
            without a doubt you will not do well the first time. none of us did. If money is an issue ( as it is for most of us ) I think the TA185 wouldnt be a bad choice. The only thing that concerns me a bit is the "hurry" you seem to be in. This is going to take some time, seriously. I think if you approach it with wanting to learn how to weld, rather then wanting to weld a project, you may have better luck sticking to it. Also you dont need a fancy machine to weld aluminum, the humble OA torch will do a fine job, but with a learning curve. I would find someone in your area as a teacher, cut out 50 coupons, and start learning the good and the bad.
            "Better Metalworking Through Research"

            Miller Dynasty 300DX
            Miller Dynasty 200DX
            Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
            Miller Millermatic Passport

            Miller Spot Welder
            Motor-Guard stud welder

            Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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            • #21
              welding takes time to learn right.

              PLEASE don't take this wrong. I'm new on here and don't want to get evicted.
              yea, thats not going to happen.LOL good to have ya with us.

              what they all say should be taken to heart. if you have a desire to learn and a teacher, TIG can be learned fairly quickly by some one with a fair amount of skill using there hands.
              if its about just building this one car/cooler and you have no teacher, i suspect your TA-185 will be on e-bay in a few months as you try to unload the POS.
              no its not a POS, but without proper teaching aluminum can be very,very,very frustrating. many give up on TIG all together due to it. it can act like apposing magnets as the bead's of the two pieces you are trying to weld will pull away from each other instead of melting into one. and thats just the start of the fun. did i mention its very frustrating. LOL
              however, on the brighter side. if you survive the frustration and get a hold on the process its great. its relaxing, its quiet, and produces beautiful strong bonds on any metal.
              yes its worth the learning curve, but not all will make the cut. it is not as easy as it looks on TV. but it is as cool. stereo ruining low in the back ground and a nice relaxing arc to spend the day with. great for relaxing and art work. and a great skill to have. but it is no impulse thing and can not be rushed.

              if you are in a rush MIG is your only option and i hope its not used on anything critical. welding is not as easy as it looks and should be taken seriously. MIG welds can look great and not hold for poooo. welding should not be taken lightly. just look at the garbage in the "why stupid people" thread.
              put the time in and learn it properly. it will be a skill that you will be glad you have for a life time. and save you big $$ in repairs, even just around the house.

              the key here is, put the time in to learn it right you will be glad you did. try to force it and you will be hating it in no time.
              thanks for the help
              ......or..........
              hope i helped
              sigpic
              feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
              summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
              JAMES

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              • #22
                OK. Maybe I have come off sounding too gung-ho and that I can learn this in no time flat. If that is how I am portraying myself, I apologize. I know it is a skill that takes lots and lots of practice. TIG even more so (as nobody seems willing to let me forget ). The same goes for aluminum.

                I have been considering learning to weld for a few years now. I have reached the point were I have finally decided to attempt to do so. Yes, I do have projects already in mind. No, they do not have to get done anytime soon. At least by me. The few little things that should probably get done within the next six months or so I can easily take to a local metal shop and have done if I am still not competent by then. Also, none of the projects I have in mind are suspension related sorts of things. Putting my life in danger with rookie welding skills is not something I plan to do.

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                • #23
                  sounds to me like you are a perfect candidate for the TA-185.
                  i and probably the others got the impression you needed to get this done soon and could be going on impulse. i suspect within a month if you give it some time, TIG could be to the point of producing solid welds, even if not beautiful welds.
                  i have truly enjoyed my TA-185 and have no problem recommending it as a fine TIG unit. its not the Dyn but is a fine alternative if 240V is available. and the accessory kit that comes with it is of top quality as is the unit its self.
                  i recommend 2% lanthanated as the best choice for tungsten. it works just as well on AC as DC so its got you coverd on both options and holds up well to heat on the higher options as well as works great in 1/16" low apm options.

                  TIG will use a great deal of argon, especially in the learning stage. keep this in mind when getting a tank for it.

                  you will also want to get SS. wire brushes for aluminum work and keep all your prep accessory's for aluminum separate from the ones you use on steel and SS.

                  i'm shore in time you will be very glad you chose to learn TIG, i know i am.

                  welcome to the world of TIG.
                  thanks for the help
                  ......or..........
                  hope i helped
                  sigpic
                  feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                  summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                  JAMES

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                  • #24
                    Thanks. I'm sure I'll have many questions down the road. Now I just have to make the final, final decision to make the purchase. Then do it.

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                    • #25
                      when you finally get ready to order i highly recommend IOC(see above). i purchased all my welding machines and plasma cutters threw him. not only is he fast but he was there for me when i needed help on a warranty issue. he got me the phone #'s to the top people and helped me get it all coordinated threw my local service department. being a internet sale he could have easily just said " take it to some one near you and let them handle it" but instead he got me #'s and made some calls for me to get it all handled quickly and painlessly. needless to say he is my first choice dealer.
                      thanks for the help
                      ......or..........
                      hope i helped
                      sigpic
                      feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                      summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                      JAMES

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by fun4now View Post
                        when you finally get ready to order i highly recommend IOC(see above).
                        Aye. I plan on buying from them. Excellent prices and good recomendations.

                        Now I just need to come up with a list of everything else I need. Rods, helmet, gloves, fire extinquisher! , argon tank, etc. Feel free to suggest things (especially things not obvious to the likes of me).

                        Are torch consumables swappable among brands? Or do you have to buy brand specific parts?

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          the TA comes with a CK brand torch #17, or mine did any way. may be a weld craft now not shore, but they are all for the most part interchangeable within the #.
                          #17 being a 150amp air cooled torch.
                          gloves ( i really like the Miller line), hood ( i have the BWE) you will need more cups and guts for the torch as it comes with one set. and the cups will break if drooped.
                          filler is dependent apon what you will be welding(LWS will be best source).
                          if you don't have one a 4.5" grinder and some flap disks are great. metabo is top dog here but high $$. for home use a portacabe or dewalt is a good option. i recently got a craftmen 7 amp, so far i like it but my portacable are my favorite.(could not afford a dewalt..some day maybe)
                          flap disks the walters are one of the top dog's but again you have to shell out the $$ for them.
                          these guys are the best $ and a good quality disk.
                          http://stores.ebay.com/Lehigh-Valley-Abrasives
                          i have used them with great results.

                          hope thats of some help. the wife is dragging me off to bed so i gotta go.
                          thanks for the help
                          ......or..........
                          hope i helped
                          sigpic
                          feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                          summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                          JAMES

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            dont forget to make one of these for it.
                            Attached Files
                            thanks for the help
                            ......or..........
                            hope i helped
                            sigpic
                            feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                            summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                            JAMES

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by root View Post
                              OK. Maybe I have come off sounding too gung-ho and that I can learn this in no time flat. If that is how I am portraying myself, I apologize. I know it is a skill that takes lots and lots of practice. TIG even more so (as nobody seems willing to let me forget ). The same goes for aluminum.

                              I have been considering learning to weld for a few years now. I have reached the point were I have finally decided to attempt to do so. Yes, I do have projects already in mind. No, they do not have to get done anytime soon. At least by me. The few little things that should probably get done within the next six months or so I can easily take to a local metal shop and have done if I am still not competent by then. Also, none of the projects I have in mind are suspension related sorts of things. Putting my life in danger with rookie welding skills is not something I plan to do.

                              Naive and delusional, maybe. But you'll find that 'too gung-ho' will come in very handy.

                              Your second paragraph says everything I wanted to hear, like it's any of my business. You've been wanting to do this for years, awesome! You're making it happen. And you'll never regret buying too much welder.

                              These guys love pictures, when you start blowing holes, post pics. Someone will help ya.

                              Good luck!!
                              RETIRED desk jockey.

                              Hobby weldor with a little training.

                              Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

                              Miller Syncrowave 250.
                              sigpic

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by fun4now View Post
                                the wife is dragging me off to bed so i gotta go.
                                Insert joke here about why that might be an occassion to frown.

                                Thanks for the equipment supply input. Always helpful.

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