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Stainless Steel Crawfish (seafood) boiler - Miller 211

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  • Stainless Steel Crawfish (seafood) boiler - Miller 211

    I have wanted a stainless steel burner / boiler for a while now. Hot salty water ruins all the steel ones with time and they eventually need to be replaced. I am hoping this one will last a while because it is built with 304L stainless.

    This is actually the second one I made and will be a gift for my father-in-law who taught me how to boil these hot and tasty Louisiana crawfish (I grew up in the mountains in California and always thought "crawdads" were just good for bait, until I moved here).

    The flame this bad boy puts off is intense and can boil a 100 quart pot of seasoned water in just a few short minutes. In fact, it can easily turn the rungs of the burner glowing orange.

    (And I'm sure I'll get comments about the glass table... haha. I was desperate for a good flat surface for tacking as I have not completed a welding table just yet.)

    The Miller 211 worked like a champ. I am using 0.030" 308L with 98% argon 2% CO2. My heat and wire speed settings varied a little on some of the thin pieces, but I was able to achieve spray settings quite easily welding the 3/8" round stock. There was almost no splatter. I was very pleased with the little amount of clean-up needed.







    Last edited by Lindley; 05-21-2011, 06:55 PM.

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    • #3
      Pretty Cool. Never had Crawfish...Bob

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      • #4
        hmm

        nice job cant wait to get out and get some bugs to boil up i do need a better burner may have to copy yours my niece the crawfish queen

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        • #5
          Wow. That’s very cool. I must say you’re very talented. We also boiled crawfish at home. My dad boiled crawfish for us.

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          • #6
            Sorry, double post, see below.
            Last edited by Bistineau; 02-02-2012, 12:45 PM.

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            • #7
              Crawdad season is coming up soon, get ready for a Hot Tub Party, Louisiana Style. How many pounds of Mud Bugs will that cook in one batch? You make any pots to go with those burners? Your location had me thrown off, New Orleans Northern California. I knew something wasn't right about that, then read the post, a transplant. But it looks like your catching on to the way things ought to be.

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              • #8
                Mudbugs are good......but...... I could really hurt myself on shrimp.... espescially the big fat late season ones.....

                NEAT PROJECT....

                keep us posted with pics and progress on the pot......

                especially the maiden boil.......

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                • #9
                  Looks great but the combination of stainless steel, salt and heat can cause stress corrosion cracking.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bistineau View Post
                    How many pounds of Mud Bugs will that cook in one batch? You make any pots to go with those burners?
                    Thanks everyone for the replies. I've boiled about 10 to 12 batches with the burner so far. It was made for a 80 to 120 quart pot. I use a 100 quart and, depending on the initial temperature of the water, I can get it to a rolling boil in under 10 minutes, usually much less.

                    Despite the salt water and heat, I haven't seen any stress cracks or broken welds. Seems to holding up well!

                    I never thought about making a pot; it's just too easy to buy one with the basket and lid ready to go.

                    One thing is for sure, it's Mardi Gras time! Les bon temps roulette!

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                    • #11
                      Jets?

                      What did you use for jets? Did you just drill a hole in the tubing?
                      I have never had good luck with jets before without a lot of trial and error concerning airflow. Flames burn out due to lack of O2.
                      Thanks for the post.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kaos View Post
                        What did you use for jets? Did you just drill a hole in the tubing?
                        I have never had good luck with jets before without a lot of trial and error concerning airflow. Flames burn out due to lack of O2.
                        Thanks for the post.
                        Drilling holes in pipe works very well, IF you are using good quality stainless steel. The mild steel tends to corrode and the hole either elongates or plugs up. If you are going with the latter, then a drilled brass orifice would be best.

                        In terms of airflow, on my design I used those short vertical tubes mounted to the horizontal pipe. The vertical tubes have plenty of airflow from the bottom. That directs the flame, shields it from wind, and creates a Venturi type suction from the bottom that pulls oxygen in to fuel the flame. For example, if I place the burner down in a dirt area and turn on the gas, leaves and debris are sucked up from the bottom and blown out of the top of the tubes without even lighting the flame!

                        Good luck. Let me know if you having other questions.

                        Lindley

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                        • #13
                          Would you please post pictures of the finished burner. Also some pictures and details of the actual burner would help a great deal.
                          Thanks,
                          Nick

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by kiwi View Post
                            Would you please post pictures of the finished burner. Also some pictures and details of the actual burner would help a great deal.
                            Thanks,
                            Nick
                            That is the finished burner.

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