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inner shield

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  • inner shield

    someone please explain the inner shield to me , I think it's simple afraid to ask dumb question's but appreciatew it. I wasn't sure if it's a certain techniqe or not ! thx so much everyone.

  • #2
    innershield is a cored wire with flux in the core. The flux shields the weld pool. It has good penetration and your able to weld outdoors in windy conditions where your shielding gas would get blown away.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Clavacle View Post
      innershield is a cored wire with flux in the core. The flux shields the weld pool. It has good penetration and your able to weld outdoors in windy conditions where your shielding gas would get blown away.
      Is that similar to mig welding?

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      • #4
        it is mig welding.

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        • #5
          i have a flux core welder.
          its easy to use.
          and great around the farm for my service truck

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          • #6
            Let's Clarify the Terminology for Wire Feed Welding

            Originally posted by fabricator
            it is mig welding.
            No......It's not.

            If you guys want to be part of a proper "professional" welding site, interact with professional tradespeople, and think of yourelves as "welders" then you should start using the proper terminology. I know I am going to catch some flack for this but that is OK by me.

            Mig (Metal Inert Gas) is an old term that is no longer used....It has been replaced with GMAW (Gas-shielded Metal Arc Welding)

            Flux Core is FCAW (Flux Core Arc Welding) and can be self shield or dual shield.

            Self shield is the wire already described that is "gasless"

            Dual shield requires the presence of an additional inert gas just like is required by GMAW. If you try to weld dual shield wire without the shielding gas, you will have porosity and make a mess.

            I am well aware that it is very common to refer to any form of wire feed welding as "Mig".....but it is inaccurate and improper, so it's about time everyone makes the effort to get it correct.

            Thank you.

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            • #7
              Both are forms of Wire Feed welding.

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              • #8
                Blackwolf, you beat me to it.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tnjind
                  Blackwolf, you beat me to it.
                  Hopefully the members will take my post the way I meant it to be......The owner's of this site want us - the professional tradespeople, to interact with the hobbiests and newcomers......No problem on my end..... but as the professionals, we should be more diligent in educating these individuals in the proper terminology as a starting point to their "Online Education" for lack of a better term.

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                  • #10
                    mig

                    have my 3 G cert, the job posted was inner shield welding and I know the structure is galvinized. I wasn't sure that's what they wanted, A mig welder for that. It usually call's for standard 7018 stick for structure. They have to heaty it also outside when it's cold like this time of year or the inspector will fail it! thank's for your input.mjz ironworker.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Black Wolf View Post
                      No......It's not.

                      If you guys want to be part of a proper "professional" welding site, interact with professional tradespeople, and think of yourelves as "welders" then you should start using the proper terminology. I know I am going to catch some flack for this but that is OK by me.

                      Mig (Metal Inert Gas) is an old term that is no longer used....It has been replaced with GMAW (Gas-shielded Metal Arc Welding)

                      Flux Core is FCAW (Flux Core Arc Welding) and can be self shield or dual shield.

                      Self shield is the wire already described that is "gasless"

                      Dual shield requires the presence of an additional inert gas just like is required by GMAW. If you try to weld dual shield wire without the shielding gas, you will have porosity and make a mess.

                      I am well aware that it is very common to refer to any form of wire feed welding as "Mig".....but it is inaccurate and improper, so it's about time everyone makes the effort to get it correct.

                      Thank you.
                      black wolf while i agree with this, i was refering to the process.one only has to look at millers products board and see that they are called MIG welders.so are they wrong?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by fabricator
                        Millers products board - see that they are called MIG welders.so are they wrong?
                        Not "Wrong" but please take another look at the products list. Everything is listed by generic name or time accepted "slang", then by proper AWS nomenclature that properly explains the process. Old & obsolete (New & Proper)

                        Examples:

                        Mig (GMAW) Metal Inert Gas is no longer used....Gas shielded Metal Arc Welding is.
                        Tig (GTAW) Tungsten Inert Gas is no longer used....Gas shielded Tungsten Arc Welding.
                        Stick (SMAW) Well, stick will always be stick....Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

                        I suggested using proper nomenclature because it simplifies things when members ask questions. Which is easier to you???

                        "Yeah, I'm having a wire feeding problem with my Mig......."

                        VS

                        "While GMAW with .035" ER70S-6, I am having a problem with...."

                        Just thought if everyone used the same (proper) terminology, things would be simpler.

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                        • #13
                          Mig is what they call the machine nowadays. GMAW and FCAW are the processes (we tend to just call them gas or fluxcore here, but then again I own the shop so I can call them whatever I want). I've never worked anywhere that the machines were referred to as the fcaw or gmaw or gtaw, etc. I've been around long enough not to be confused by terminology and am much more concerned with proper procedure.

                          Now to answer the mans question. The primary differences have already been pointed out. FCAW has more dig than GMAW and it does take a little adjustment on technique and requires the same type of cleaning between passes as SMAW. Fluxcore works well on galvanize (in fact they make a wire specifically for it). In ironwork in order to use 7018 all of the galvanize must be ground off (anything done to code requires that regardless of electrode) whereas 6010/6011 can be used to weld without grinding the galv off (not for code welding though) that's why they use 5P on unistruct (that may be misspelled) for the electrical stuff. If you grind the galv off there is nothing left to weld. I have worked with the ironworkers (G6 cert) and have never seen FCAW utilized except for skinning boiler houses. I am sure that will be changing in the future, if it hasn't already, especially with the introduction of Lincoln's STT process which is cheaper, faster and simpler.

                          As in all processes the procedure is determined by the code, or the wire classification for non-code work. Some FCAW wires are all position, and some are limited position just like stick electrodes.

                          Bottom line is that if you are a good hand with GMAW then FCAW is an easy transition.

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                          • #14
                            fcaw is mig without the sheilding gas since it is self shielded wire.

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                            • #15
                              On a lighter note. While it is correct to call a process using flux cored wire FCAW but it sure sounds stupid to say. I use MIG because it is easier. The type of wire comes later if needed. For example, I MIG welded it together using flux cored wire. If you buy a machine to weld FCAW it will say MIG on the box. I am a professional welder with many years of experience. Now I work inspecting welds and qualifying procedures. Even the most experienced person will call the general process MIG. I think the most important thing this can do is create and maintain a non intimidating atmosphere for the new welder to seek answers to questions. If more information is needed ask, nicely. Otherwise that person will leave with a bad feeling for the best welders made, Miller. Sorry for the rant.

                              Paul

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