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First Project - Work Tables

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  • #16
    You need to search for "welding tables" on this site.Also I suggest a more powerfull welder for 3/8 and thicker. Here is a link to mine. http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ighlight=table
    2- XMT's 350 cc/cv
    1- Blue star 185
    1- BOBCAT 250
    1- TRAILBLAZER 302
    1- MILLER DVI
    1- PASSPORT PLUS
    1- DYNASTY 200 DX
    1- MAXSTAR 150 STL
    1- HF-251 BOX
    1- S-74d
    1- S-75DXA
    2- 12-RC SUITCASES
    1- 8-VS SUITCASE
    2- 30 A SPOOLGUNS

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    • #17
      Originally posted by jbyrd View Post
      I am utilizing the X-clamp for the welding table I am building. The shank for the x-clamp is 5/8 of an inch. You will need at least 1/32 for clearance to ease sliding. The portion that rides under the table is 1-1/8 of an inch. Again clearance is necessary for ease of installation. I can post a pic of the clamp if that helps.

      Jay
      Excellent! A picture would be great, and those were the dimensions I needed. There is a larger hole at the end to slide through the locking mechanism correct, or will a 5/8+(2*1/32) hole suffice the whole way?

      We will be cutting those by hand....it's going to be interesting.

      Thanks for the post.

      ASME@USF

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by NoogaD View Post
        I'm sure those guys using 1/2" are welding some serious iron, but if you guys are doing school projects and personal stuff to learn some basics, I'd guess 3/8" would work for your purposes as well. Keep in mind if you ever want to move it, 4' x 8' sheet of 3/8" weighs about 600 lbs. I made some removable casters and jack up the table and bolt them on to move the table for cleaning, space, etc.
        Great thoughts. I was thinking the 1/2" guys were probably doing large projects. We compete in the ASME Human powered vehicle, and Electrathon of America Electric Car races, so our projects are much smaller.

        We have retractable power from the ceiling throughout the shop, but space is DEFINITELY at a premium, we share a small garage with 2 other student groups. We'll definitely design a larger shelf into the bottom. The "conference" table has a small one, but the tool bench could probably benefit from one as well.

        Thanks!
        ASME@USF

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        • #19
          Originally posted by NoogaD View Post
          Keep in mind if you ever want to move it, 4' x 8' sheet of 3/8" weighs about 600 lbs. I made some removable casters and jack up the table and bolt them on to move the table for cleaning, space, etc.
          The conference table will weight 570.?? lbs according to Solidworks, and as such that one will have dedicated attached castors that reside just inside the leveling bolts. The tool bench weighs slightly less, so we'll use man power to lift each side up onto a set of dollys we have should it need to move.

          Thanks, they're definitely heavy!

          ASME@USF

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          • #20
            Originally posted by fabricator View Post
            You need to search for "welding tables" on this site.Also I suggest a more powerfull welder for 3/8 and thicker. Here is a link to mine. http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ighlight=table
            Thanks for the pics, I Love the doors! None of our projects will ever approach 3/8" except for the table, do you think we can get by with the 140 for this project? If not we may need to try to borrow one from a local area firm, as the 140 will be a donation, and is not currently replaceable.

            We did extensive searching of this forum before the design, it's where we got most of the ideas, so we're looking for personalized thoughts on our chosen design.

            Don't know why I never came up with pics of yours, but I really love the doors, we'll have to consider that, especially as there are nearly 15 people with keys to the garage which houses our shop.

            Cheers
            ASME@USF

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            • #21
              Originally posted by fabricator View Post
              Did you round the corners for aethetics? We were considering it, but it'd be quite a bit of work, as we have no access to plasma cutter or a water table.

              Thanks
              ASME@USF

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              • #22
                Originally posted by USFASME View Post
                Did you round the corners for aethetics? We were considering it, but it'd be quite a bit of work, as we have no access to plasma cutter or a water table.

                Thanks
                ASME@USF

                Water Table? You don't need no stinking water table. All you need is a torch to shape the corners. Badges are optional.
                If you don't anchor the table to the floor it's a lot more versatile in the future.
                If you put all-thread adjustment on the bottom of the legs you can level the table in spite of ground conditions, and take out wooble on the inevitable uneven floor.
                Struts with all-thread/nuts between the legs, down close to the bottom let you tune out (some) plate warp (if your legs are heavy enough) when you need a fairly flat surface.
                If you have a full frame under the table top as opposed to just legs welded on, you usually don't even need to weld the plate. Gravity does the work for you and it gives you the option of removing/replacing the top and substituting something different at times. Like plywood, grating & other things that work better in some circumstances. Plus it won't pull your plate if you are wanting a flatter work surface.
                Personally I'd go a little heavier on the legs if I could afford to. Never know what the future holds, someday one of those "other groups" sharing your garage space might throw a wild party and load your table with drunk dancing fat chics without your permission
                Salvage business' can be a great source for good used of even new materials at a considerable cost savings. Just gotta look around because inventory is constantly changing, you never know what usefull treasures you might stumble upon.

                JTMcC
                Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JTMcC View Post
                  If you don't anchor the table to the floor it's a lot more versatile in the future. JTMcC
                  There will be large castors under each wheel. The bolts are just for leveling purposes, and to support the weight. The castors will allow us to move the table.

                  Good idea on not mounting it rigidly, it could let us take the top off and replace with wood.

                  Great idea on the salvage yards, we'll have to look around for those.

                  Table was FEAd at several thousand pounds...if they can get that many drunk chicks on it, well heck...I'd pay to see that.

                  ASME@USF

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by USFASME View Post
                    There will be large castors under each wheel. The bolts are just for leveling purposes, and to support the weight. The castors will allow us to move the table.

                    Good idea on not mounting it rigidly, it could let us take the top off and replace with wood.

                    Great idea on the salvage yards, we'll have to look around for those.

                    Table was FEAd at several thousand pounds...if they can get that many drunk chicks on it, well heck...I'd pay to see that.

                    ASME@USF

                    Itr's your money, spend it as you wish
                    But all calcs aside (and this may not apply to anything you might need to, it does for me) but when you clamp or tack a piece to a table and apply large amounts of Heave-Ho (pirate terminology) with long cheaters or a comealong, you can tweak a set of wimpy table legs.
                    We work regularly with full grown experienced engineers and 72.8% of the time they fail to foresee the odd abuses heaped upon the construction aids they sometimes draw. The legs of your proposed table are going to be a limiting factor in the future.
                    If the calcs are all that matter, why are you asking? Good luck.

                    JTMcC
                    Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I'm asking to get real-world experienced answers, and I certainly appreciate yours. What do you recommend instead? Large tubing, or thicker?

                      For loads that are no vertical, which is primarily what was tested, it may be a better idea to put in some angled support members rather than simply thicker material right?

                      Thanks
                      ASME@USF

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by USFASME View Post
                        I'm asking to get real-world experienced answers, and I certainly appreciate yours. What do you recommend instead? Large tubing, or thicker?

                        For loads that are no vertical, which is primarily what was tested, it may be a better idea to put in some angled support members rather than simply thicker material right?

                        Thanks
                        ASME@USF
                        Either or, in both cases. A little heavier wall or bigger tube depending on what you can find at a good price (the scrap yard shopper sometimes uses what's on hand) remembering that you're on a tight budget. I do most of my shopping for this type project in my bone yard so we're dialed in to using what's on hand at least part of the time.
                        Or angled support if it doesn't interfere with what if anything you intend to do under the table such as storing tools/welding machine. You say space is limited so I'd take max advantage of under table storage. The cross bracing might hinder access, maybe not. Run the pricing each way and your answer is clear.
                        I just know that when you put a vise on a table or secure a piece by other means, and then tweak that piece with sufficient angry jerking and a-stompin fury, it's good to have sufficient safety factor built in to avoid the unanticipated stresses and strains and assorted OOP's that happen late at night.
                        You could do the work on a bare shop floor really, so whatever table you end up with will be helpfull and convinient even if it's not the "perfect" setup. And they can always be modified/chopped up/bucherized later. I understand you want to get it right the first time, but most things of this sort get "improved" after being used for a while. MK IV is always mo better than MkI
                        Just my opinion so really you can take it or leave it.

                        JTMcC
                        Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Excellent thoughts the whole way around, and space is definitely at a premium, so we'll look into making the members larger.

                          I'm sure this will be modified with time, but being the engineers in training we are, we have a need to over analyze things and run through our numbers. That's why I'm glad so many member with real experience are throwing in their knowledge.

                          Thanks for all the ideas.
                          ASME@USF

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by USFASME View Post
                            Excellent! A picture would be great, and those were the dimensions I needed. There is a larger hole at the end to slide through the locking mechanism correct, or will a 5/8+(2*1/32) hole suffice the whole way?

                            We will be cutting those by hand....it's going to be interesting.

                            Thanks for the post.

                            ASME@USF

                            The X-Clamp can be had for about 45 bucks.


                            The inner shank is 5/8 and the larger part is 1-1/8.

                            I would look into having your local steel supply or fabrication business plasma cut the steel. My local welding supply will be plasma cutting my 5x10 1/2 thick steel for a little over 100.00.

                            Jay

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by jbyrd View Post

                              The inner shank is 5/8 and the larger part is 1-1/8.
                              Jay
                              Excellent, thanks for the photos! Does the 1-1/8 inch part spin off, or is that what the holes on the outside tips of the X's need to be cut out to?

                              Those help a lot, thanks so much.

                              ASME@USF

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by USFASME View Post
                                Excellent, thanks for the photos! Does the 1-1/8 inch part spin off, or is that what the holes on the outside tips of the X's need to be cut out to?

                                Those help a lot, thanks so much.

                                ASME@USF
                                Yes that whole piece does spin-off but you do want the bigger holes at the end of your slot to ease installing and removing the clamp.

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