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Pup peepholes for sale or rent.....

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  • Pup peepholes for sale or rent.....

    Not really. Every now and then someone will ask about ideas for making things at their home shop they can sell and make a buck or three.

    The other day a nice lady called and asked if I did window guards. I explained that I don't do window guards because people die when there is a fire and there are guards on the windows.

    "No. Not that kind" she said. "I want a window guard for my dogs to see out of our privacy fence."

    "I can do that" I said.

    2" X 2" X 1/8" inch angle outside frame. Inside measurements are 8" X 16". They are attached with six lag screws into the horizontal rails of the fence. I added a 2" X 2" cedar rail for the bottom or top not supported by the fence rail 2" X 4". The 2 X 2 was attached to the pickets with stainless screws before I cut out the hole.

    Installed this way they window grill is secure. You can shake the fence and not shake the grill.

    Pricing: For the guy working out of the garage I would suggest $50.00 each for the grill and at least $50.00 for the installation. A regular business would have to have more of course because employees are involved. I used a cordless drill, cordless impact, and of course a cordless sawsall for the install. This particular client paid more than what I suggest and she had me do three of them at her house.

    She loves them. Her dogs love them too. Love makes the world go around.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    ya know, ive always liked your work, sir.... and again, im diggin the job.... nice lines, sir

    Comment


    • #3
      Hey harv,
      Now, that is what I call unique & quite marketable. Nice job, well executed, & looks to be profitable..... that's how it's supposed to be. You did good...... matter of fact, I'm gonna copy it...with your permission.

      Denny

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by yorkiepap View Post
        Hey harv,
        Now, that is what I call unique & quite marketable. Nice job, well executed, & looks to be profitable..... that's how it's supposed to be. You did good...... matter of fact, I'm gonna copy it...with your permission.

        Denny
        That's why I put it up here!

        I've got an antique tire roller (the iron rings around wooden wagon wheels are called tires). I rolled the pieces of quarter inch bar stock into three foot circles. They worked out perfect for giving me arcs that matched in the panels.

        I wish I was an artist. Because if I was an artist I would form the quarter inch bar stock into images of dog breeds. That way I could charge twice as much!

        I do recommend the fastening method I used. I thought a lot about it and believe the fasteners being in shear makes the connnection a lot stronger over time because wood and metal like to separate over time.

        I think it's great that you want to do it too.

        Comment


        • #5
          Excellent idea!!!! The mounting is VERY well thought out, you cannot see any fasteners which is good.

          Rudy

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RudyOnWheels View Post
            Excellent idea!!!! The mounting is VERY well thought out, you cannot see any fasteners which is good.

            Rudy
            Rudy, what kind of precautions are you taking to protect yourself while welding?

            For those who didn't get it Rudy is a paraplegic. That means he can't feel anything below his injury. He could have a dingleberry land on his leg for instance and not know it until he smelled burning flesh. Or he could move into a hot piece of metal and get severely burned and not know it was happening. The same thing goes for machinery.

            Rudy must have a real love for welding to expose himself to the potential of serious injury. He is to be congratulated for his passion but I hope he is taking care to protect himself.

            When I see someone like Rudy I guess I appreciate it more than others. That's because I had a friend who was a super quad and he still did work even though the risk was greater for him than someone who could feel their legs and belly.

            I'll never forget the panhandler who hit me up for a dollar at a gas station one morning. I gave him a buck in a moment of weakness and so I guess he thought that paid for some conversation. He asked me what I did. When I told him that I was a weldor he said he went to school for that but didn't like all the burns from the hot sparks.

            Thank you Rudy for doing instead of quitting. And if you have a situation where you need some brainstorming to overcome a situation, well, we're here.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by welder_one View Post
              ya know, ive always liked your work, sir.... and again, im diggin the job.... nice lines, sir
              I know you're from Arkansas and I'm from Texas, but there's no reason for the "sirs".

              Seriously, thanks, we're family and we don't need the formality.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by wroughtnharv View Post
                I know you're from Arkansas and I'm from Texas, but there's no reason for the "sirs".

                Seriously, thanks, we're family and we don't need the formality.
                its an old army habit that dies hard... i meant nothing by it, just hard to overcome the urge to call everyone "sir" or ma'am

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by wroughtnharv View Post
                  I wish I was an artist.
                  Don't kid yourself
                  You're an artist

                  frank

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    very nice work - looks great!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by wroughtnharv View Post
                      Rudy, what kind of precautions are you taking to protect yourself while welding?

                      For those who didn't get it Rudy is a paraplegic. That means he can't feel anything below his injury. He could have a dingleberry land on his leg for instance and not know it until he smelled burning flesh. Or he could move into a hot piece of metal and get severely burned and not know it was happening. The same thing goes for machinery.

                      Rudy must have a real love for welding to expose himself to the potential of serious injury. He is to be congratulated for his passion but I hope he is taking care to protect himself.

                      When I see someone like Rudy I guess I appreciate it more than others. That's because I had a friend who was a super quad and he still did work even though the risk was greater for him than someone who could feel their legs and belly.

                      I'll never forget the panhandler who hit me up for a dollar at a gas station one morning. I gave him a buck in a moment of weakness and so I guess he thought that paid for some conversation. He asked me what I did. When I told him that I was a weldor he said he went to school for that but didn't like all the burns from the hot sparks.

                      Thank you Rudy for doing instead of quitting. And if you have a situation where you need some brainstorming to overcome a situation, well, we're here.
                      Thank You! I do protect myself, and this is another reason why I only Tig weld these days, no flying sparks or slag, for the most part. I do all my welding with a leather apron on, draped over my legs and feet (and $400 air cushion!) and aldo put a leather welding jacket over my legs under the apron. When I first started to re-learn how to Tig running the pedal with my elbow, (.60 thou or less aluminum 99.9% of time) I set the torch in a holder I had made to the left of my left leg. (I am left handed) Well, little did I know, it fell out of the holder, I musta bumped it, and must have sat on my leg for a min or so. I started having muscle spasams, and my legs were going nuts, but I didnt think too much of it. The torch must have fell on the floor after a min or so. Well, later on that night, I see a big WET spot on my jeans on top of my thigh. I think, wtf? So I pull up my jeans, and my leg has a quarter sized puss-leaking burn on it, that is what the "wet stuff" was. I thought to myself, WOW, I bet that hurts like a MOFO. "Today, is a GOOD DAY to be paralyzed LOL"...... When my legs were jumping up and down and going nuts, I didnt think too much of it because i used to get real bad Urinary tract infections all the time, and those would give me bad spasams. But it was my leg feeling the pain, the pain signals just dont make it to the brain to alert me of the situation, due to my spinal cord injury. Think of it as the wires being cut or smashed in the conduit (my spinal cord) between the nerves, and my brain...... I do my best to avoid these sorts of things nowadays!!!

                      Thanks for thinking of me!

                      Oh, and I still LOVE the pup-peepholes idea!! Can I borrow the pics?

                      Thank You, Rudy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Rudy if you don't tell anyone and click on my signature you'll find all kinds of things to copy anyway or how you can.

                        I just think it's wonderful that you're trying when so many give up when their hill is a hill and yours is a mountain.

                        When I grow up I want to be like you when it comes to attitude.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by wroughtnharv View Post

                          I just think it's wonderful that you're trying when so many give up when their hill is a hill and yours is a mountain.

                          When I grow up I want to be like you when it comes to attitude.
                          perfectly said, harv...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by welder_one View Post
                            perfectly said, harv...

                            well stated welder_one and wroughtnharv


                            Great job - thanks for the photos and technical details.



                            "Rooms to let - fifty cents"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Getting back to the original topic, one thing I would be very careful about is the size of the spacings, and the direction of the tapered spacings. Being in and around the livestock business for years, the rule is straight and square, you don't want an animal getting its head, legs, or feet caught, big space one end little space the other end.

                              Not sure about dogs, but any four-legged animal in my experience, would have a hard time extracting itself from getting wedged into a downwards taper, whether the dog works its head into the wide part, or simply jumps on the fence, and its leg slides down into the gap.

                              Turn the thing over, probably ok.

                              Just food for thought.

                              Comment

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