Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Trailer Cracked Frame Repair

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Trailer Cracked Frame Repair

    My latest welding job was to repair the cracked frame of my friendís landscape trailer. I believe that the hanger wasnít welded in the proper position on the frame, which would have allowed the shackle to be vertical in the unloaded condition. This most likely caused the high forces in the hanger, and caused it to break. Ever since the hanger broke, the eye of the spring functioned as a slipper spring and rubbed on the frame. Unfortunately the frame wasnít thick enough so the eye of the spring eventually dug a slot in the frame. Eventually the slot was deep enough for the eye of the spring to be trapped by the hook that it created in the side of the slot of the frame. When the trailer was loaded it caused the spring to lengthen, which put high forces on the hook of the slot. This caused the metal to be raised on the hook side of the slot and eventually caused the frame to crack.

    This repair should get my friend through his busy fall leaf clean up season. In the spring I would like to replace the frozen pins and weld a pipe into the frame to serve as a hanger for the shackle. This will allow the fore and aft degree of freedom that the spring requires, without raising the trailer height too much. The heavy duty axle and truck tires already make the trailer on the high side. A torsional axle might be a better solution to minimize the trailer height, as wrench bender pointed out in a previous post.

    http://www.redneck-trailer.com/2009/A/A26-A29.pdf
    Attached Files

  • #2
    More Pictures:
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • #3
      Having a 200 dx why not stick weld this with 7018-3/32 seems like it would have been easier/faster then tigging that frame.Don,t know if those sharp corners on your reinforcing plates was a good idea also?Just my opinion,everyone does things different.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Don52 View Post
        More Pictures:
        Nice repair!
        I certainly don't expect this one to break again.
        Maybe somewhere else, but not at the repair
        pg

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by admweld View Post
          Having a 200 dx why not stick weld this with 7018-3/32 seems like it would have been easier/faster then tigging that frame.
          The frame is only 1/16 inch thick and I have better control with TIG. Plus I didn't want to get sparks on me as I was lying on my back under the frame to weld the horizontal, vertical, and overhead weld positions. It did take me a long time to weld it -- Stick would have been faster.

          Don,t know if those sharp corners on your reinforcing plates was a good idea also?
          You are right I should have chamfered or used a radius on the corners to reduce the stress concentration.

          I appreciate you taking the time to comment.

          Don

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by piniongear View Post
            Nice repair!
            I certainly don't expect this one to break again.
            Maybe somewhere else, but not at the repair
            pg
            I agree that it most likely won't fail where I welded it. For my last repair I painted the entire outside of the trailer with the Rustoleum conversion coating and then a glossy black top coat. It held up very well. In some of the pictures you can see some rust on that inside of the frame. I think that I will paint it in the spring to stop this failure mode.

            Thanks for your comments,
            Don

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Don52 View Post
              I agree that it most likely won't fail where I welded it. For my last repair I painted the entire outside of the trailer with the Rustoleum conversion coating and then a glossy black top coat. It held up very well. In some of the pictures you can see some rust on that inside of the frame. I think that I will paint it in the spring to stop this failure mode.

              Thanks for your comments,
              Don
              Yes sir, I like it!
              With a thickness of only .0625, using the DX200 Tig was the thing to do in my opinion.
              It sure made a nice clean repair.
              pg

              Comment


              • #8
                In some of the pictures you can see some rust on that inside of the frame. I think that I will paint it in the spring to stop this failure mode .
                Too good,,,,, especially since it looks like the operator just kept driving this long after an obvious problem developed.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                  Too good,,,,, especially since it looks like the operator just kept driving this long after an obvious problem developed.
                  You are correct. I brought the formation of the slot to my friends attention several years ago, and suggested that we fix it. We only observed the formation of the crack about three weeks before I repaired it. Once the crack formed it really took off. The frame was entirely cracked on both sides and 25% across the top. There was very little holding the frame together! Once the slot got deep enough the spring must have applied a huge force to the frame to crack it so quickly.

                  Don

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Your friend must have a Guardian Angel

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Gardian Angel is right!!

                      Someone lost a small trailer on I85 here in SC a month ago while towing it. Killed 2.

                      http://www.independentmail.com/news/...derson-county/

                      While looking up that story, there were pages after pages on the web of the same thing.

                      Prompted me to have a good look at my boat trailer. I need to add a safety chain from the winch to the boat.

                      Oh nice repair!!!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I checked out your link. Loose trailers can be a real hazard!

                        For this cracked frame, the trailer would still stay together even with the frame completely cracked because the crack is behind the rear spring support and the wood of the trailer would have held it together. I made the time time to repair it because once the frame crack went completely through the ends of the tube would bang together and make the repair a lot more difficult.

                        Last year I was more concerned with the hitch falling off, but fortunately my friend replaced his tow vehicle and the hitch this past spring. See more on the hitch below:

                        http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ighlight=hitch

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Nice repair don. I see you are from MI, I am also. Howell. There are far more trailers driving around in this sort of condition than people know. I have a friend with a lawn service with a 28" enclosed R&R, and we have fixed it more times than I can count. It was pretty much broken in half a couple times. Thankfully, he just finally retired it. I looked at your other thread about the trailer hitch. Salt is **** on things here in MI, especially vehicle frames and trailer hitches. I had a 95 E-150 van, and it had a class 3 hitch on it that was paper thin by the time I got rid of it. I think they use the cheapest garbage chineese steel on these hitches, those step bars and grille guards for pickup trucks. How many of those step bars have you see where all that is left is the curved part and the bracket that bolts to the frame?!

                          Rudy

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X
                          Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.