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  • journeyman
    started a topic did you know?

    did you know?

    you can weld alum to steel. anyone know the process???

    just a brain teaser

  • SavageSunJeep
    replied
    Originally posted by Wheelchair View Post
    A few months ago while I was healing from surgery I watched a show about this process( Explosion ** welding on the discovery channel, you may be able to contact them and buy the episode and as I remember the process was very successful.

    Hope this helps
    Wheelchair
    Yea, that was very interesting

    Leave a comment:


  • Anti-GMAW
    replied
    Signwave, that peice is most certainly explosion welded. The tell tale sign is the riple effect in the transition zone. Claded peices of metal are used frequently in the ship building and pressure containment industrys. Explosion welding is generaly done using AN, although other explosive agents such as PETN (most commonly used as the filler in det-cord) or tetrytol (altough rarely, other agents are used). AN is a 90/10% mix of amonium nitrate and fuel oil. They place one peice over the other with a very precise gap and place wooden forms around the top peice. They then place a specific amount of explosive on top of the first peice.
    when they detinate the explosive it slams the 2 peices together at such a high velocity that a jet of plasma forms between the two peices. The plasms burns away any impuritys on the surface of the 2 peices as they join together.

    Leave a comment:


  • SavageSunJeep
    replied
    Originally posted by Wheelchair View Post
    A few months ago while I was healing from surgery I watched a show about this process( Explosion ** welding on the discovery channel, you may be able to contact them and buy the episode and as I remember the process was very successful.

    Hope this helps
    Wheelchair
    I saw that. It has been observed for some time and noted in the military where examples of unlike metal to metal welding takes places in combat situations. Tanks getting hit with with extreme high speed rounds that cause the inside metal to melt and explode in a process called spalling. It was noticed that in testing that welding was taking place. This led to:

    They take to plates that want welded together, lay one atop the other and cover it in plastic explosives. Not sure what kind, but it has to be high speed like det-cord.

    In spite of it sounding crude it is far from it. It is a very precise process. Too much C4 and the metal no longer is with us, too little and nothing happens.

    here is some more info:

    http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/ex...e-welding.html

    Leave a comment:


  • tacmig
    replied
    Oh boy here we go..

    Melting steel and fabricating things that were useful was the reason I believe I went into welding. The electrical arc and watching steel melt before my eyes was as good as se%! Now imagine blowing crap up! Oh man, someone please approve this process now.

    TacMig

    Leave a comment:


  • SignWave
    replied
    here's a piece

    JM,
    Heres a piece of "cladding" as Bob calls it. I have had this piece since i was 12 years old. My grandfather brought it home from a ship yard. It is used to join the steel hull (where strength is needed) to the superstructure (where light wieght is prefered).

    The process as to how its made, i havent the foggiest. So Ill go with Kaboom!!! It sound exciting enough though not the educated answer I would rather have given.

    Enjoy.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by SignWave; 12-23-2007, 02:26 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • c wagner
    replied
    Originally posted by neophyte View Post
    Cold Metal Transfer ?
    Neo
    Here is a link from the Fronius website that explains CMT. Looks like a pretty cool process!

    http://www.fronius.com/cps/rde/xchg/...9_ENG_HTML.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • journeyman
    replied
    Tackmig and Wheelchair

    thanks very much for all the info

    Leave a comment:


  • Wheelchair
    replied
    A few months ago while I was healing from surgery I watched a show about this process( Explosion ** welding on the discovery channel, you may be able to contact them and buy the episode and as I remember the process was very successful.

    Hope this helps
    Wheelchair

    Leave a comment:


  • tacmig
    replied
    Try this out..

    I think you might get some more info from here.

    http://www.highenergymetals.com/

    Good luck,

    TacMig

    Leave a comment:


  • journeyman
    replied
    wow, thanks guy's, does anyone have any sort of references to this stuff???

    I'd really appreciate it

    Leave a comment:


  • c wagner
    replied
    Originally posted by shorerider16 View Post
    The shop I used to work at (temp. layoff) had a trailer division. One of the guys I worked with showed me a piece of Aluminum somehow bonded to Steel that acted as a sort of weld in adapter. I'm not really sure how they were joined, but you could clearly see the line of speration between the two metals. I'm going to go out on a limb and say theat the strength of this join was very high as it is used on load bearing transport trailers on public roads.
    I know what your talking about, I was also shown this on a drop deck trailer, didn't believe it until I saw it! I also was shown a coupon of 18ga cold rolled welded to a similar thickness aluminum coupon using a Fronius machine. It's cool to see constant devolopment in this great trade!

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Its called cladding like the nickle and copper in coins. It is done underground outside Pittsburg with explosives. The force of the blast seals the different metals together....Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • journeyman
    replied
    tacmig

    thanks for the input

    i'd appreciate it if you do happen to come across anything. if i do i'll let you know.

    thanks again

    Leave a comment:


  • shorerider16
    replied
    The shop I used to work at (temp. layoff) had a trailer division. One of the guys I worked with showed me a piece of Aluminum somehow bonded to Steel that acted as a sort of weld in adapter. I'm not really sure how they were joined, but you could clearly see the line of speration between the two metals. I'm going to go out on a limb and say theat the strength of this join was very high as it is used on load bearing transport trailers on public roads.

    Leave a comment:

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