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  • #31
    Alright, I'm pretty happy with the stainless steel results I've had for my first try I still need to work on ending the weld w/o burning through the steel...

    .040 Tungsten, 13CFH. Scrap 20GA mirror finish stainless. Don't need to use any filler if the joint is tight. Anyone know where I can get some stainless filler rod smaller than 1/16"?

    Is there any tricks to minimizing the heat marks on the stainless other than less amperage?





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    • #32
      toofazt,
      thats a nice looking weldment. I cant seem to get my SS welds to look like that. they are all grey black and ugly looking... Im definelty doing something wrong. I'll post later on as i am making a retainer for a plate of glass.

      as for the heat marks, there is a product availble that will "wash" those marks off. without the use of abrasives or buffing. I wish i could give you the name of it.. Sorry.

      If you call up one of the local metal guys, they may be able to give you the name of it. I suspect its some sort of readily availble acid... I dont kow any more than that.

      Rich
      Will it weld? I loooove electricity!

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      • #33
        Originally posted by SignWave View Post
        toofazt,
        thats a nice looking weldment. I cant seem to get my SS welds to look like that. they are all grey black and ugly looking... Im definelty doing something wrong. I'll post later on as i am making a retainer for a plate of glass.

        as for the heat marks, there is a product availble that will "wash" those marks off. without the use of abrasives or buffing. I wish i could give you the name of it.. Sorry.

        If you call up one of the local metal guys, they may be able to give you the name of it. I suspect its some sort of readily availble acid... I dont kow any more than that.

        Rich
        Thanks Rich. If anyone knows the name of the "metal wash" to remove the heat marks that would be great!

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        • #34
          ss

          toofazt

          to reduce burn through at the end of your weld travel the other way. weld inbound from the outer edge so that the heat has somewhere to go. to reduce heat traces you'll have to strain your eyes and get in there tighter. less amps and adequit gas coverage is the only answer.

          as for the solution for removing heat traces it is called "pickling paste" highly acidic so be careful and follow instructions, but it does wash off with just water.

          signwave, your grey black crap, thats called "carbide percipitation"
          this is the result of holding the material in the 800-1500deg/f for too long.

          hope this gives a better understanding

          Carbide Percipitation= occurs in the 800-1500d/f range and is a result of chromium being depleted from grain boundries and forming with carbon, hence the name carbide percipitation. this depletion causes a loss of corrosion resistance. another trade name is "sugar".

          your simply too hot or your spending too much time in the area. excessive heat leads to excessive heat traces which leads to "sugar/ grey black/carbide percipitation"

          if you guys need anymore help feel free to ask

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          • #35
            ss

            almost forgot both you guys might benefit from trying different techniques of feeding your filler. allowing capillary attraction to take the filler is one, but i've always prefered the washing technique.

            just lay your filler rod down and use a slight side to side motion. you'll notice that you can get away with much less amps with this technique. you'll sometimes have to manipulate the rod but this way is easier to achieve an appearance of a uniformed bead, especially for a novice.

            much patience and good luck

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            • #36
              Thanks guys

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