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fish mouthing round pipe

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  • fish mouthing round pipe

    guys, what do you use to fish mouth round pipe that will be welded together ?
    is there a tool you can bring to the job site ?
    i have seen it done on a milling machine, (seems too time consuming, and i dont have a mill), and seen those jigs that are held in a vise and you hook up a drill and hole saw to, but that seems a little time consuming also.
    just curious what you guys are using ?

  • #2
    I've done it a few ways.

    If you have a piece of small tube the same size, and its a straight up 90, you could just grab a grinder, and go to town. Finish with a half round file. Thats the quick and dirty...not always the best joint, but works in a pinch.

    You could also use a JD2 or similar hole saw jig. The angles are much easier to make, and it really isnt that bad when it comes to time. Use some good tap cutting oil, and it'll work pretty well. Just dont load up the hole saw...I've sheared all the teeth off of one in less than 10 seconds, and that was a starrett.

    They also make one that does a mechanical cut, not sure what size tube you're working with, so that may not be an option.

    If you only had 1 or 2 to do, and fitment doesnt need to be dead nuts perfect, the grinder would be the quick and easy way IMO, if you dont want to spend the money on another tool.

    If you had odd angles, or you had a long cut list, I'd be all over the hole saw or another option.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by FABMAN View Post
      guys, what do you use to fish mouth round pipe that will be welded together ?
      is there a tool you can bring to the job site ?
      i have seen it done on a milling machine, (seems too time consuming, and i dont have a mill), and seen those jigs that are held in a vise and you hook up a drill and hole saw to, but that seems a little time consuming also.
      just curious what you guys are using ?
      I would say you might do some research on this in the welding discussions side, we have had many threads on this and there are pics out there as well.
      Using a chop saw is about as fast as anything once you get the hang of it. You can generally make 1 or 2 cuts and get an excellent fit with some finesse.
      Also the type of material and size would make a huge difference in your methods.

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      • #4
        if you are patient, do what on fire suggested and take it 1 step further, go to a craft store and pick up a sheet of magnetic sign material, cut a small rectangular piece, make it wrap around the joint that you just prepared, trace out and cut the magnetic stuff to match what you have done with the pipe, take a marker and label it, you have just made a template for the next joint, and it will stick on your tool box for future use, if you do alot of pipe, it wont take long to build i nice set of templates, time consuming to make, quick to use and almost free

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        • #5
          Or you could do it the old fashioned way. Some people use adding machine paper, I like 1/32 inch gasket material. These old arthritic hands have a hard time working with adding machine paper. You can buy a pipe fitters book to get these charts.






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          • #6
            Last four.







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            • #7
              There are lots of ways to notch pipe, almost as many ways to do it as there are threads here on doing it.

              Here's something I shared with the high school kids the last time I visited.

              Place a framing or speed square against the side of the pipe with the pipe on a flat surface. Measure the distance from the edge of the pipe to the square. Cut that measurement out of the end of the pipe. We're talking a side to side arc with the deepest part of the cut matching that measurement. Turn the pipe over and do the same thing on the opposite side.

              Most of us that have done it more than a hundred times or so just make the cuts and it fits without measuring. As has been pointed out before the need for a fit depends upon the application.

              The angle cuts can be challenging. One of the interesting things I discovered was one of the more common cuts I'm called upon to do involves handrails down stairs. It turns out the perfect cut is really simple. It's basically approximately a thirty degree cut starting in the middle of the end of the pipe.

              I do a lot of pipe fence that's galvanized so a torch is out of the question, too messy and too many fumes etc and so on. So I use pipe notchers like the Vogel or Williams Low Buck, I have both or I use a portaband band saw.

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              • #8
                wow guys, thanks for all the helpful info. i now have several ideas and can go from here.
                again, thanks

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                • #9
                  Google tube miter. It's a program for your pc. You enter the pipe size info and it prints a line on the paper. Cut it out and wrap it on the pipe, lay ot out and cut it. It worked pretty good for me. If i did a lot of it i would look into a pipe master set. They are nice.

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                  • #10
                    We have a simple tube notcher we use at work that mounts on the table. This is as simple as it gets and very effective. Very nice tool for making round handrails or equipment guards.

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                    • #11
                      I just chuck it up in the JD2 notcher and go at it with a 1/2" drill and proper holesaw.


                      How could a poster that calls himself "FABMAN" ask this question?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
                        I just chuck it up in the JD2 notcher and go at it with a 1/2" drill and proper holesaw.


                        How could a poster that calls himself "FABMAN" ask this question?
                        I don't know!

                        Personally I'd go the JD2 route myself and make a portable tripod stand to mount it to while in the field. The quick, simple and easy way to notch tubing and pipe.

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                        • #13
                          pro tool has a good notcher also. I have the racer model and it works great. Harbour freight also has one cheap. I also had one it works good, but I have a thing for good quality tool, thats why I went with the protools. You could also check these sites. Hope this helps.

                          http://pro-tools.com/hsn500.htm

                          http://www.harborfreight.com/pipe-tu...her-42324.html

                          http://snip.awardspace.com/

                          http://www.harderwoods.com/pipetempl...&Submit=Submit

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                          • #14
                            thanks for all the ideas guys.
                            i knew about the hole saw notcher rigs, and have been doing it the old fashioned way with my grinder, but was just curious how you all did yours.
                            thanks again.

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                            • #15
                              Welding suppliers sell pipe wrap and it can be cut and fit to match the exact fit-up.

                              P

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