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Winch Truck Questions

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  • Winch Truck Questions

    I am currently in process of buying a 1990 Ford F250 4x4 Diesel Pickup. Once the truck is paid for and I take possesion of it, I plan on making a small winch truck out of it. I plan on building a flatbed with a rolling tailboard and gin poles. The truck as it sets has the stock 8' box on it. How long could i extend the new bed without altering the frame, and how tall can i make my gin poles?
    Also the truck is an automatic transmission so i can't put a PTO winch on it like i would like to. If i go with an electric winch, what would be a good selection? Any help and advice would be appreciated.

    Bryce

  • #2
    It won't take much hanging behind the wheels to over do a 3/4 ton. I've never rigged up a winch truck, but from the ones I've seen the poles are set pretty close behind the axle. How much do you need to lift? How high?

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't plan on doing much real heavy work with it, just some general work around the farm and for use in my work as a handyman. I know that its a little too heavy for a 3/4 ton, but I don't have a 1 ton at my disposal. I do a lot of work on metal buildings and stuff like that.

      Bryce

      Comment


      • #4
        You can always swap in an F350 DRW axle and springs. There is very little difference between an F350 dually and an F250. Most of the difference that matters is in the rear axle and springs.

        56" cab to axle longbed pickup chassis usually don't use a bed longer than 9 feet.

        Comment


        • #5
          You could run a hydraulic winch. There is a ton of brackets ect. to mount a hyd. pump to the engine as these trucks saw wrecker duty as well. Might even be able to score the whole setup, pump and winch, off a salvaged wrecker.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have seen 9-10 ft. bed on 60" ca wheel base. 10' looks odd and might be to much cantilever behind the rear axle of a 56" ca.
            I'd go with 9' and add just 1' to the frame. Most people go with std. channel iron the same size as the frame.
            As for your poles attach them close behind the cab. You can lift more and use the motor as the counter weight. Make one part of the pole slide into the other part. Theoretically you could have about 16-17' feet of pole, and not stick out the back when collapsed. Make the pulley removable, then you lay the poles straight on the bed and have more deck space.
            Off set the winch and make it self erecting.
            I don't think autos come with a PTO plate.
            I have used Warn winches with good luck.
            Good Luck,
            Bob

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by burden1990 View Post
              I am currently in process of buying a 1990 Ford F250 4x4 Diesel Pickup.
              8<--------
              Bryce
              Originally posted by Bob Miller View Post
              8<--------
              I don't think autos come with a PTO plate.
              8<--------
              Good Luck,
              Bob
              The transfer case may have PTO plate(s) depending on the case.
              Put tranny in gear & Transfer case in neutral.

              Jay

              Comment


              • #8
                any standard 8' bed pickup, will look good with a 9' flatbed. Single rears, keep the width under 7'3" to 7'6",,,,, otherwise, it will look like crap.

                More importantly, show me an electric winch, that can hold a vertical load,,,, 2000# plus, sufficient for general scrapping work.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The transfer case in that truck should be same as mine, a Borg-Warner 13-56. It's an aluminum case with chain drive, part time, available in both manual and electric shift in F250-350 trucks in those years. I'll have to look on my transfer case to see if there is a pto plate on it or not.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by davinci2010 View Post
                    You could run a hydraulic winch. There is a ton of brackets ect. to mount a hyd. pump to the engine as these trucks saw wrecker duty as well. Might even be able to score the whole setup, pump and winch, off a salvaged wrecker.
                    Does anyone have any idea what one of these setups would run as far as the cost. The engine is the International 7.3L diesel, is there room under the hood to mount the pump on one of these diesel trucks. As far as the transfer case goes, I'm not sure which one it is or if it has a PTO plate, I'll go over where the truck is sitting and look later on today. How hard of a task would it be to swap out the rear axle with one out of a dually, I would like to have the added capacity of a one ton. Thanks for all your suggestions so far and keep them coming.

                    Bryce

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have researched this axle swap in great detail for my truck and intend to do it at some future time. Here is what I have found.

                      To swap to a dually axle on that year F250 (and my '92 F350SRW as well), all you need is the Ford/Sterling/Visteon 10.25" DRW model axle from an '86-'97 F350 DRW pickup, as well as the wheels/tires. The DRW pickup axle with bolt straight up, as will the springs. Rear springs are the same length and width (3" wide) on the F250/350SRW/350DRW pickups in those years. It is best to get the whole axle complete, hub to hub, including the brakes and the springs. The duallys use slightly wider (1/2") and slightly larger diameter (1/8") brake drums and shoes.

                      Since your truck is 4wd, you will need to match the axle ratios of both front and rear axles. Factory stock axle ratio in these trucks was 3.55. 4.10 was optional on all F250-350 pickups, so the axle you find can have either ratio. There should be a tag attatched to one of the differential cover bolts stating the ratio. It can also be stamped into the cover. You can also count the teeth on the ring gear and pinion gear and divide to find the ratio. There is also a ratio code on the door jamb vehicle info sticker that states the ratio. I believe '39' is the code for a 3.55 ratio with an open differential. If there is a letter in the code, the differential is a limited slip. Numbers only, no letter is an open differential. I forget the code for 4.10.

                      The springs are also heavier to match the axle's increased capacity. The dually 10.25" axle is rated for 8250 lbs, versus 6250 lbs for the F250/350SRW model 10.25" axle. Springs are rated appropriately higher at 7500 lbs for the dually versus 6000 lbs for the F250/350SRW. Get the upper auxiliary overload spring setup from the dually while you're at it.

                      The rear sway bars are a little different too between the F250/350SRW pickups and F350 DRW pickups. Your F250 probly doesn't have the sway bar, so this would be a good time to add it from the dually donor truck.

                      Do not choose an F350 DRW chassis-cab as the donor truck because the chassis-cab axle is not wide enough and the spring pads and shock mounts are mounted in the wrong places to fit the pickup frame, due to the chassis-cabs having 34" frame rail spacing versus the pickup's 37" or somewhere thereabouts frame rail spacing.

                      Do not use a '99 or later truck as the donor truck either, unless you want to make the swap more complicated. The wheel bolt pattern is not the same (8 on 6.5" with 9/16" studs for the early trucks versus 8 on 170mm with metric studs for the later trucks). Frame rail spacing and axle width may also be different. The newer trucks' single rear wheel axles are wider than the older trucks. Not sure about the duallys. The newer trucks use rear disc brakes, which probly means also swapping the master cylinder and possibly brake booster. The discs would be a good improvement in braking though.

                      If you want to run the overloads, you will need to remove the overload spring bumper brackets from the donor truck's frame (grind off and punch out the rivets) and bolt them to your F250 frame (which should already have the holes) with regular grade 8 bolts or huck bolts.

                      To make it street legal with the duals, you will need to add the 3 red marker lights in the rear center below the tailgate and the 5 amber marker lights above the cab, as well as the amber and red marker lights on each side of the truck bed. Any vehicle over 80" wide must have the lights to be DOT legal.

                      You could run single rear wheels and tires on the dually axle to keep the width under 80", but you lose the additional capacity of the dual sets. You will still need a hub-centric type of wheel though, to use the dually hub as the support for the wheel.

                      The transfer case will be the Borg-Warner 13-56. It was used on all F250/350 old body trucks from the mid 80's through '97. Ford used the BW 13-42 on Broncos and F150's in those years. They stopped using New Process 203/205/208 transfer cases in the mid 80's, actually probly earlier than that for 203 and 205.
                      Last edited by Desertrider33; 06-22-2010, 10:08 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have not checked the prices on the used market for these winches. New they are quite pricey as they are heavy duty to say the least. You will be most likely to find what you are looking for on a salvaged rollback style wrecker. The winches on these are rated around 10,000 lbs. single line pull. None of the winches described so far are made for overhead lifting, so for saftey's sake keep that in mind. There is plenty of room to mount the pump underhood on your 7.3. The wreckers I described ran the same setup for the winch. The pump will have an electromagnetic clutch and pulley so you can turn the pump on or off via a switch. You will also need a way to boost the engine rpm while the pump is operating. Some trucks used a manual cable setup, but most had an electric solenoid at the injection pump with another switch in the cab. With this type of setup there is no need for a PTO at the driveline. You will of course have to supply a hydraulic tank, hoses, and controls ect. This winch would be overkill for your rig, but the likelyhood of finding a smaller hyd. winch on the salvage mkt. might be more difficult.
                        Electric winches are o.k. but they get expensive as capacity increases and they draw a lot of amperage. By the time you set up an electric with a high output alternator, good batteries, power cables and short circut/overload protection, your still in it for some $$$.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That axle swap doesn't sound too hard, I looked at another F250 a little while ago that had been swapped to a DRW axle, but the mechanic that did it wasn't home where I could talk to him, so thanks for laying out the procedure for me. As far as the winch goes, I'm still trying to weigh my options on price and usability. Thanks again and I will keep everyone posted once I start taking on this project.

                          Bryce

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Here is a winch I found for sale, may be a bit overkill though. Let me know what you all think.

                            Bryce

                            WINCHES, CABLES & ACCESSORIES


                            WINCH 8,000LB RAMSEY W/FREESPOOL
                            $1,100.00
                            JD350

                            well it was supposed to have a picture with it

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Search hydraulic winch on Fleabay. There's a 9000# Warn hydraulic winch new with free shipping for about $1200.00.

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