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  • #46
    This is a great thread- lots of good links and feedback. Congratulations on a successful project.

    When I work with pipe, it's schedule 40.

    I use an "Old Joint Jigger" pipe notcher, just about exclusively to cut a through-hole in pipe where I'll insert a smaller diameter pipe. I bought an extra shaft and had it pointed- I insert this into the fixture to index the notch or hole from center punch marks I lay out on the pipe. I do some notching with the fixture, also.

    For tee joints, etc., I've found that two small dishes opposed at 180 degrees on the pipe edge, made with a torch or grinder, will suffice.

    Getting the overall dimension of the tee joint, the height, is what we're after.

    On smaller diameter pipe, you can get away with not notching at all, and filling the gap with metal.

    MIG works best for this, probably 7018 next best. I usually weld pipe with 6010 or 6011.

    I saw 6013 mentioned- does anyone have any real use for this rod? I've never seen any use for it, but I'm willing to listen

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    • #47
      Congrats on finishing. I'd like to see some pictures. Also, there actually isn't a 2 3/8" pipe. Pipe is measured by the I.D. and so 2" pipe is 2 3/8" O.D. Its a small thing, but for some reason it bothers me.(BTW tubing is measured O.D.)
      As far as smashingthe pipe to weld it I have found that my little 20 ton press works well. I also don't smash it completely, but leave 1/2" to 3/4" space in between the walls. I don't get near as much splitting that way. Also, make sure the seam doesn't fall on the top or bottom (the narrow ends) of the smash. Put it in the middle of the flat section an dit is less likely to crack.

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      • #48
        Drill stem in these parts is generally reffered to in a couple of different sizes.

        2 3/8" and 2 7/8"

        You are correct those are outside diameters.

        All I know is if you walked into any steel yard and asked for some 2" drill pipe they would look at you like you are crazy.

        Maybe it's a regional thing but that is the way it is reffered to here atleast.

        I only had a 12 ton press to use for the crimping on the last project but even still with drill pipe you cant squash it more than maybe 3/4 of an inch between the walls without it splitting, it is about 1/4" wall material and quite hard. Much harder than regular water pipe etc.

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        • #49
          Saddles

          I use propane to torch cut I get a smaller kerf also try angling the tip a little away from the good piece this will leave the slag on the dropand you dont have to grind as much also WELDING SUPPLY STORES HAVE SADDLE jigs come in handy

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          • #50
            [QUOTE=tool;192718]Drill stem in these parts is generally reffered to in a couple of different sizes.

            2 3/8" and 2 7/8"

            You are correct those are outside diameters.

            All I know is if you walked into any steel yard and asked for some 2" drill pipe they would look at you like you are crazy.

            Maybe it's a regional thing but that is the way it is reffered to here atleast.

            I only had a 12 ton press to use for the crimping on the last project but even still with drill pipe you cant squash it more than maybe 3/4 of an inch between the walls without it splitting, it is about 1/4" wall material and quite hard. Much harder than regular water pipe etc.[/QUOTE

            Funny how the name of things change in different regions. Around here drill pipe (or stem) is usually referred to as 4 1/2" or 5" that we actually drill with. We have alot of 2 3/8" and 2 7/8" tubing we use to get the oil & gas to the surface. When times were slow a good many years back (as they also are now) we took old 2 3/8" upset tubing and built alot of fence at the owner/bosses ranch. You look at those fences today and wonder how somebody could afford to build one at todays prices.

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            • #51
              It's not hard to saddle pipe with a torch. Mark the bottom (deepest) part of the saddle and start there. Think of it like drawing a smiley where you start at the bottom and move the torch to one side, then repeat for the other side. I hold the torch angle at about 30 degrees pointing toward the end that will be cut off. It's a little hard to explain, but it's not hard to do once you see what the cut looks like. I wouldn't think about using a saw if I had many cuts on oil field tubing.
              Jim

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              • #52
                I suppose I could see calling it 2 3/8" drill stem as 2 3/8", as drills are referred to by their outside diameter. In my mind I still think of drill stem as pipe though, as it is pipe. I have put a couple of oddball pieces in my fence as well, and now that you mention it they were hard as heck to smash. In fact I had to heat one of them up with a torch first. It was also magnetic and hard to weld. Fortunately the rest of my stuff is sch 40 gas pipe that I have salvaged over the years. and welds and smashes nicely.

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                • #53
                  hole saw works.

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                  • #54
                    some pics from our first pipe fence project. A couple magnetized pieces, broken equipment, 7 days of 103* weather and a small fire were the only notable hiccups on an otherwise fun project.







                    5x10 Bluco Fixture Table
                    Cincinnati shear 10'x1/4"
                    '11 Lincoln Power Mig 216
                    '10 Syncro200 TIG runner
                    Scotchman CPO 350 LT cold saw w/ AMS

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                    • #55




                      5x10 Bluco Fixture Table
                      Cincinnati shear 10'x1/4"
                      '11 Lincoln Power Mig 216
                      '10 Syncro200 TIG runner
                      Scotchman CPO 350 LT cold saw w/ AMS

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                      • #56
                        Pipe Fence Question

                        I just cut some fairly nice saddles in 2 3/8 pipe using my 4 X 6 saw. I set the vice at 27 1/2 and made two cuts, 180 apart. The saddles were plenty close enough to weld with my MIG.

                        Of course, these pipes were not in the ground.

                        John

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                        • #57
                          On the warm side

                          Hmmmmm That did not look like a little fire to me, good thing your truck was not in the middle of it.

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                          • #58
                            They make a jig just for cutting saddles on pipe fences and I have used one to build about 5 miles of fence at my house. It is made out of metal and it clamps on the pipe. All you have to do is run the cutting torch around the jig and you have a perfect saddle. They work really well and you can pick them up at your local welding supply house. Good luck and the only adivce i ould have is take your time and do it right the first time.

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                            • #59
                              Hand Notcher

                              There is a hand notcher available that works pretty well for the field applications. I have used these in the past for building handrails at paper mills, lumber mills, etc. It would be easy to mount to your reciever hitch on your truck.
                              http://www.vansantent.com/ironWorkers/proHandPress.htm

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                              • #60
                                Fabing a Fence

                                FusionKing has it right use the chop saw to cut the pipe(on a 2" your cut should be about a 1/2" back) leaving as he said aprox an inch in between (on the end)the cuts. The only thing I would suggest is using a slightly worn 5x1/4 disc to grind the inside of the flats. Kinda feather them out. I've built miles of haindrail with this method and once you get used to it it can be faster than the ironworker method.

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