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What is your most used manually operated Practical Home shop built tool/tools

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  • What is your most used manually operated Practical Home shop built tool/tools

    What is your most used manually operated Practical Home shop built tool/tools

    There have been a lot of useful ideas of home shop built tools and equipment on the site and I would like to see other ideas of other manually operated

    So if you have any home shop built tool/s that you use often? No matter how crude or rough in design it may be or how common.

    If so and you would be willing to share you design and photos of your tool you built plans, dimensions, materials tooling to build etc.

    Anything manual operated from yard tools to shop tools and specialty tool that served you well in the application you designed it for.

    Any devices for holding things at odd angels like weed eaters and chain saws for repair to screw jack type liftís and Jigís for line fabrication of any item or product.

    Thanks'
    CH!

  • #2
    A BROOM!! To sweep up your mistakes!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Workbench

      The home shop does not have as much room as I have tools and stuff --
      so a work bench with good storage, ability to serve multiple uses, be on
      wheels (to move it out of the way) is really necessary. Without it, I'd
      have too much space devoted to storing things and not enough to
      actually do anything.

      Frank

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey CH,
        Here's some of my homemade tools I use daily.
        1. Scroll bender
        2. Bracket bender
        3. Hydraulic press
        4. Sq. steel bender
        5. Rodbender

        Have some jigs & fixtures also. Another post....

        Denny
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #5
          Great job. Keep the photos and ideas coming. Love to see how inventive all of you guys are.

          Comment


          • #6
            re: What is your most used manually operated Practical Home shop built tool/tools

            Originally posted by Leefy View Post
            Great job. Keep the photos and ideas coming. Love to see how inventive all of you guys are.
            I may have posted it before, but I still use these day in and day out. It's a copy of woodworkers hold down clamp. I just put it over a workpiece on my welding table, smack the tool once or twice with my brass hammer and the piece is usually secure enough to weld or grind on. I don't use them daily, just every time I'm using my welding table.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Denny,you have some great ideas,thanks for sharing them on the board. Now if I can just get time to make some of them.

              Comment


              • #8
                I got a 4 foot 1\2" extension bar for when I took out my tranny. I got a dodge ram. I also made a little pully for the differential nut or bearing... it's been awhile.

                I'll get some pics up as soon as I can.

                -Tre

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by yorkiepap View Post
                  Hey CH,
                  Here's some of my homemade tools I use daily.
                  1. Scroll bender
                  2. Bracket bender
                  3. Hydraulic press
                  4. Sq. steel bender
                  5. Rodbender

                  Have some jigs & fixtures also. Another post....

                  Denny
                  Always a pleasure to see your ideas Denny would like to see picís of the jigs when you get the chance.

                  Keep them coming: cool:
                  CH!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jworman View Post
                    I may have posted it before, but I still use these day in and day out. It's a copy of woodworkers hold down clamp. I just put it over a workpiece on my welding table, smack the tool once or twice with my brass hammer and the piece is usually secure enough to weld or grind on. I don't use them daily, just every time I'm using my welding table.
                    Great idea might have to make one or two for my welding table less adjusting of the C-clamps for quick securing of a work piece not a bad idea at all

                    Keep them ideas coming!

                    CH!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by treflip View Post
                      I got a 4 foot 1\2" extension bar for when I took out my tranny. I got a dodge ram. I also made a little pully for the differential nut or bearing... it's been awhile.

                      I'll get some pics up as soon as I can.

                      -Tre
                      Hello Tre, post up some pics when you can
                      CH!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey CH,
                        Here's some more ideas you may find you can use or modify.

                        1. Multiple plate drill jig. I use this to drill (8) 1/8" steel or alum. plates at a time with a template on top. I made different size jigs for the different plate sizes. Saves a lot of time & quite productive.

                        2. Drill press alignment angles w/Starrett adhesive reversible tape to drill a series of measured hole spacings. The guide angles can be shifted on the press table to drill in any position on flat stock from the center to the edge. A lot easier than marking every inch or whatever.

                        3. Jig for extending & welding rod or tube up to 1.5" dia.

                        4. Jig to add on additional leg to make a 3-way or 4-way component. Can be used to make "T", corner, or cross(+) brackets.

                        Denny
                        Attached Files

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          CrazyHorse - Great topic

                          I bellieve all the members here are all guilty of and I am glad to be a part of what I call - "Designed and built here by real working people.

                          I have spent hours designing, modifying and building a fixture or gizmo that I could have purchased but I needed to do it "my way"

                          So here is my poor man's version of a really short metal brake.

                          This has been very useful and the parts are easy to replace when they wear out.
                          Comes in handy for 90 degree and less bends if I am careful.

                          Not too obvious but there is a set screw to hold the top part to the arbor press ram so I can take it off for other uses.

                          I made this attachment for my 1 ton arbor press for a customer several years ago.
                          He wanted hundreds of 90 degree bends in 1/8" x 1/2" steel flat stock.
                          Pieces varied in lengths from 4" to 12" and he supplied all the pieces cut to length.
                          I just needed to make one 90 degree bend in each piece where he had drawn a line and he did the rest of the fabrication.

                          He came by with one piece and asked what I would charge for a 90 degree bend.
                          I told him I would do it for nothing as I really didn't feel fair charging him for a 1 minute simple job.

                          I even told him that he could do the bends himself if he wanted to save money as I showed him how simple it was to do the bend in a vice.

                          When he said he needed 500 pieces in 2 days, I almost choked.

                          So I gave him a per piece price of $.99 as a joke since I was doing a stainless tig job at the time.

                          When he gave me a $100.00 bill as a deposit and said I need them in 2 days.
                          Almost stuffed the bill in my mouth to keep myself from saying something more stupid.

                          I never found out what this was for as he was a bit secretive but for $.99 per bend, I was glad to do it.

                          Needless to say, the tig job went on hold for the night.

                          Cost to benefit ratio - $2.79 for materials, 1 1/2 hour labor- 4 beers (after the fixture was finished). Got paid $500.00 plus a $20 tip as I brought the pieces back the next morning after he dropped them off

                          Wish all my jobs and customers were like this.

                          Sometimes you get lucky....................most times you get hosed..................

                          But, I truly believe we do it for the self satisfaction for a job well done.
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Brake/Bender

                            Although not often used, it's very handy when I need it. I made a brake on the end of my welding table it's 48" and works good on 18 gauge steel or .080 aluminum.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jworman View Post
                              I may have posted it before, but I still use these day in and day out. It's a copy of woodworkers hold down clamp. I just put it over a workpiece on my welding table, smack the tool once or twice with my brass hammer and the piece is usually secure enough to weld or grind on. I don't use them daily, just every time I'm using my welding table.
                              I believe those are called bench dogs?

                              Comment

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