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Newbie Introduction!

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  • Newbie Introduction!

    Hi, my name is Ryan and i'd like to introduce myself! I'm 26 and I live in Southern California and i'm pretty new to welding and I love it! I'm enrolled in 3 welding classes at my local community college. I have a class in SMAW, GTAW, and a introduction one that covers OFW,GMAW,FCAW,SMAW & GTAW. I'd like to make welding a career and appreciate any advice I can get. I also just bought my first welder today, a Dynasty 200SD! So I think i'm off to a good start.

  • #2
    The purchase of a new Dynasty 200 should be enough motivation to keep you going when you get so frustrated you’ll want to pull your hair out! When you get to that point, (and you will) just pull out the receipt to that Dynasty, you’ll get back under that helmet!

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    • #3
      LoL That's great advice! Tig welding is proving frustraing as well as E6010 vertical up haha

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      • #4
        what are your issues with e6010 uphand?

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        • #5
          Well it's my second day in lab with the E6010 vertical up, and i've tried afew different ways of whipping the electrode but i'm having issues with undercut on my tee-joint. It seems if I wait to let the puddle fill up the weld starts to sag down and when I go fast enough to get it flat it dosen't cover enough. I'm using a straight whip with the electrode pointed up at a slight angle. Hope that wasen't confusing lol

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          • #6
            Have you tried more of a "c" (or in this case a "u") pattern? holding the sides slightly longer then through the middle, while comming slightly back into the puddle? i know thats what we usually do on a vertical down progression.

            personally i find 6010 a little easier to run with an open root and groove, then you just need to keyhole it.

            hope it helps, and if im wrong i'm sorry and i'm sure people wil tell me so!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ryno! View Post
              i'm having issues with undercut on my tee-joint.
              What brand of 6010 are you using?
              Maybe you’re running a little to hot, and remember arc length is very important!
              Have you played with the Dig option on your 200 yet? I like to run 6010 with about 95% Dig. I like how it stacks at 95%. 7018 out of position I run 100% on the Dig.

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              • #8
                try running a backwards J pattern, it works for me, you have to be sure to watch the puddle, when you see it start to solidify bring the electrode back down, its almost like doing a bunch of tack welds on top of eachother, but its simple and works perfectly fine. well for me at least, everyone is different. hope this helps :]

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the info everyone! No, I have only experimented with the whip and circles patterns. The circles up didin't work at all for me and I had alittle bit of success with the whip so i'll def. try the U and J patterns to see how they do. I'm not sure the brand of electrodes they get at school. I think tomorrow I'm going to keep adjusting my amperage and trying stringers to find the sweet spot for me. That might have been a factor and i'll concentrate on keeping the arc length short. I haven't got the 200 yet, i'm still waiting on ups but I can't wait to use it. I'm on and old DialArc at school. How do the Dig settings affect the Electrodes? Thanks!!

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                  • #10
                    The more % of Dig you use the stiffer / non-flowing the puddle will be. The less % of dig you use will give you a wetter / more flowing puddle. If you go below say 50% it harder to keep an arc going, blink your eyes and you’ll stick the rod!

                    If your welding supplier has them or will get them, try ESAB’s 10P plus 6010.
                    I also like the “J” pattern.

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                    • #11
                      Ok Thanks for the info!

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                      • #12
                        Sonora, That's some good advice right there. 100 % dig on both root and hot pass.

                        I'm doing my " British Columbia " B " class welder at the moment. It's a 16 weeks cours fulltime, while still working at the shop I've been working for the last 7 years.

                        I'm working on pipes in the 1G, 2G, 5G, 6G uphand and downhand all with E6010 roots and hotpass and cap, and some with E7018 cap. Then tig.

                        I was putting my dig at about 50 % and was finding having a hard time striking the arc. I'm going to try that at 100% dig tomorrow,

                        Do I have to reduce amperage when 100% dig, it's at about 72 amp with 1/8 rod, then at a little under 100 amp for the hot pass, on 4 " sch-40

                        I use a small U pattern going uphand, I go down one side then I go across " left" the bottom up the other side, then I come down the same side then across " right this time " then up back to where I started,

                        Thanks

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Daniel View Post
                          Do I have to reduce amperage when 100% dig, it's at about 72 amp with 1/8 rod, then at a little under 100 amp for the hot pass, on 4 " sch-40
                          I don’t.

                          I personally don’t think the Dig has anything to do with temp / amps. It’s hard for me to explain! (You’ll have to see it to understand).
                          The Dig controls the flow of the puddle, higher % = stiffer / non-flowing puddle. Lower the % = wetter / flowing puddle. I run my roots with 100 % Dig. Hot and cap around 95 % Dig, (that is when I remember to change it).


                          Daniel you run a little hotter than I do, most likely because I’m old and slow, and my reaction time is considerable slower than it use to be!

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                          • #14
                            I'm using the CST 280. It has two settings. One for xx10 soft or stiff, and one for xx18 soft and stiff. I put them both on stiff and it's still a little hard to spark and arc sometimes.
                            I'm going to try a different machine and do some test.
                            I just love welding

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                            • #15
                              3f-6010

                              Originally posted by Ryno! View Post
                              Well it's my second day in lab with the E6010 vertical up, and i've tried afew different ways of whipping the electrode but i'm having issues with undercut on my tee-joint. It seems if I wait to let the puddle fill up the weld starts to sag down and when I go fast enough to get it flat it dosen't cover enough. I'm using a straight whip with the electrode pointed up at a slight angle. Hope that wasen't confusing lol
                              1/8" 6010's (probably 5P's or 5P+) run good between 90-100 amps, vertical up on 3/16" and thicker material.

                              Your first pass will generally tend to be "humped" in the middle, especially when "whipping," due to the nature of the rod. On your second, and subsequent passes try a "box weave" and finish with a "straight weave" on the final pass.

                              If you still experience excessive undercut, reduce current, travel speed, or possibly electrode size, (in some cases), until the puddle is manageable. Also, change the electrode angle so the arc force holds the metal in the corners, using a uniform speed, and avoid excessive weaving.

                              DIG settings enhance the arc, and prevent it from "snubbing out" and is especially useful when doing open root pipe.

                              Remember, "stick" machines are Constant Current. As you move the rod closer to the work, the voltage drops, and moving it further away, increases the voltage. Voltage is electrical pressure, and does not move.

                              The DialArc is an excellent "droop curve" transformer machine. You will notice a difference when you run your Dynasty, as inverter machine arc characteristics and volt/amp curves are "flatter."

                              It's good to run the various machines, so you know what to expect. If you get the chance to practice with a good engine drive, you'll also notice a difference there as well.

                              My Maxstar 150, Sync 200 and Trailblazer, all have different "personalities."

                              Good luck with your endeavors, and keep us posted of your progress. Always good to see those who are eager and enthusiastic to learn the "trade."
                              Last edited by davedarragh; 03-22-2010, 09:35 AM.

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