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rod oven question

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  • rod oven question

    I'm trying to make a rod oven stabilizer out of an old fridge, does anyone have any ideas how to do this with out burning my garage down, I've got a 150 watt heat lamp in there and had to shut her down last night cause of the heat, I got a thermometer today I'm gonna go put in there just to see how how it gets before it starts melting something if it does, I've got almost 200 lbs of rod in there right now, any information would be helpfull.

  • #2
    I've heard of people just useing a light bulb ? I dont have one so hopefully some one else will get in on this.

    Comment


    • #3
      I put that thermometer in there and it's not quite up to 150 degrees yet, I suppose it is just gonna keep getting hotter and hotter since the heat light is in an enclosed unit, and just wondering what the melt temp. on the plastic on the inside door of the fridge, thought about riveting aluminum on the inside door and pull off all the plastic shell, just don't want to lose the insulation, I was thinking maybe a flood light might be a better option, but want to keep the temp up if I can, without having a problem

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      • #4
        I might be mistaken here but I think the refrigerater idea is more for a dry storage facility than for use as a rod oven. I think you should, as you seem to be, be very cautious of making it hot as to be used as an oven.

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        • #5
          This subject of a Rod stabilizer is a little over my head, but I do know that those that use Refrigerators for cold smoking meat never exceed 90 degrees. I've seen these refrigerators after years of use and the shelves are sagging from the heat, but there is no charring of the plastics. If you need more than 90 degrees of temperature than you might be exceeding the limits of a refrigerator.

          You can buy heating elemets that are used for smoking. Put it on the bottom the frig, but you will probably need to add some ventilation to help control the temp.

          Or try and find some sort of a heating elemet that has a thermostat to help control temp.

          Hope this helped a little.

          Frank

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          • #6
            Rod Oven Question

            Using a fridge for a rod oven is very common for some of the smaller shop that I get into. Most of the ones that I have seen have metal shelving and use only about a 100 watt bulb. A heat lamp will concentrate too much heat in a small area and create a hot spot that could cause some damage.

            My best advice is to just be careful... the whole idea is to keep the moisture out of the rods.

            Nemo

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            • #7
              I read something saying 140 was a good temp.

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              • #8
                You don't need a heat lamp; a regular bulb will give you the small amount of heat that is needed in the enclose & insulated space.

                I don't know how critical it is to maintain the temperature of the rod oven, but that lightbulb is going to burn out sometime and the heat will go away. Go to your local gunshop and you can buy a heating element that is made for this purpose. They look like small metal rods that plug in, and stay warm to the touch. In the enclose space of a gun safe, they keep the temperature just warm enough to prevent moisture from being a problem. I don't know the heat requirement for a rod oven, but I know these heating elements run for years with no problems.

                JD

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                • #9
                  hi we have an old frig at work as rod storage it has 1- 100wat bulb in it it stays around 110 deg inside with that and seems to work just fine no moisture in the rods and the bulb seems to last 9 mo. or so metal shelves are a must even better if you can make expanded metal holders for the rod so as to help heet evenly hope this helps

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    solution to my rod oven fridge

                    I decided to keep the heat lamp, and went out to home depot and got a thermastat for a portable forced air heater it has settings from 40-90 degrees, and it's set at 90, and it does shut down and back on again so it does work, thanks for all the ideas and information, it did get up to just over 150 yesterday, I sure feel alot better with the thermastat in there, this was my first post, I've been reading for 4-5 months trying to get ideas, for welding table, headache rack, go kart, etc, I'll send some pics maybe even a video of my super lawn mower pulling wheellies and running 50 miles an hour. THANKS AGAIN EVERYONE

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                    • #11
                      bulb

                      We put a little bit of dry charcoal in ours and use a 7 1/2 watt bulb when we're not opening it much and that has worked for years..no moisture problems. If the frig or freezer seals up tight a small bulb will build up heat but to keep them dry it's more about humidity..buy a cheap humidity gauge and that will tell the story better than temperature will. If you have moisture in your rods and want to use something cheap you can use a small electric counter top oven.
                      Hope this helps.
                      Farris

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                      • #12
                        old toaster oven i have used in the past as a rod oven... worked like a champ

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                        • #13
                          I think I'm gonna change from the heat lamp, I check it all the time and it's never on, so the thermastat hasn't quit working yet, its turned down to 70 now, and I even put a pair of welding gloves and a pair of work gloves in there, but I'd hate to be working out of town for a week or so and that thermastat quit, it might be ok but I don't want to take that chance, got too much invested in tools to let it burn up because of stupidity, great advice so far guys it's been alot of help, the ovens I've looked at online, go from 100-450 degrees around that area, but cost big bucks, so keeping them in a dry stable area should work great for my purposes

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by barstow151
                            I think I'm gonna change from the heat lamp, I check it all the time and it's never on, so the thermastat hasn't quit working yet, its turned down to 70 now, and I even put a pair of welding gloves and a pair of work gloves in there, but I'd hate to be working out of town for a week or so and that thermastat quit, it might be ok but I don't want to take that chance, got too much invested in tools to let it burn up because of stupidity, great advice so far guys it's been alot of help, the ovens I've looked at online, go from 100-450 degrees around that area, but cost big bucks, so keeping them in a dry stable area should work great for my purposes
                            Barstow, I think you'll be fine with a smaller bulb. If your frig seals tight try using a 40 watt and see what that does. We had a 40 watt in ours once and didn't use it for several days and then when we opened it, it was pretty hot in there that's when we backed down to a 25 then we backed down to a 7 and a half watt when we added the charcoal.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Rod Oven

                              The heat required for electrode storage is dependent on the SMAW electrode type. To store the low hydrogen electrodes ie XX15,16,18 & 28 "they shall be stored in ovens held at a temperature of at least 250 degrees F"... according to the AWS D1.1 Steel welding code. The cellulose & rutile XX10-11 & 13 & 14 should just be kept dry. If you are storing a 50 pound box of each, opened 3/32, 1/8 and 5/32 electrodes (150 pounds or more) a regular electric (don't use gas!) kitchen stove rescued from the curb or picked up used for less than 50 dollars works fantastic. Build a cabinet setting on top of the stove and use the exhaust heat to keep the cellulose & rutile electrodes dry. The pan drawer provides a handy & dry storage bin for GMAW wire spools and other consumables. If the stove is olive green you might want to use a high temp spray paint to color coordinate the decor in your shop.

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