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Looking for some advice/pointers..

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  • Looking for some advice/pointers..

    Mainly from pipe weldors, and stick weldors.. I've been working on a weld cert pretty hardcore for the last month and i just can't seem to gain consistency on my 7018 caps. My instructor and i keep tweaking things, but nothing has stuck yet. Here is the basics on the cert procedure.

    1) Coupon is NPS 2" XXS 0.436"wall A106 (seamless) pipe
    2)Joint Configuration is a Single Vee Groove, with no backing or retainers. 35degree bevel +/- 5 degrees.
    3)6G fixed position coupon maintained with out rotating or moving stand
    4)Uphill progression on all vertical portions
    5)Root gap is 1/8" with a 1/8" landface
    6)Root pass done with E6010 1/8" with a max root penetration on flush to 1/8" and both walls broken down.
    7)Balance of test is E7018 3/32" rod
    8)"Stringer beads required for root pas, susequent passes may be weave or stringers"
    9)Initial and interpass cleaning with a power brush or grinder is allowed.
    10)Cap must be left in "As welded condition", can clean with power or hand brush tho
    11)O/D reinforcement is flush to 3/16" max.


    My root is generally pretty good, it will get a little heavy on me at the top. I usually fill with 2 weave passes of 7018 3/32" with the first weave at 80A and the second weave at 85A. Then i will run two hot stringers(90A) to get me to just below flush with the shoulders, and then i run a 3-stringer cap at 95A. I run the stringers with a drag and very little movement, especially at that heat. Not that it matters but i'm using a Miller XMT 304 CC/CV with a Miller RCH 14 remote.

    pics in next post
    Last edited by DamageInc537; 02-22-2010, 04:04 PM.

  • #2
    here are some pictures i took today of the coupons i ran.

    my bottom:
    side, right to left:
    side, left to right:
    top(were i need some major guidance):

    more in next post

    Comment


    • #3
      In the stand:
      Root1:
      Root 2:

      Any advice is appreciated, thanks in advance!!! I hope i provided enough information! if not lemme know i can add more

      Jeremy
      Last edited by DamageInc537; 02-22-2010, 04:02 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Running to slow.....

        You are running to slow. I would try to cut your bead size down for the root, increase the speed. Also for the cap do it in one pass....ie more weeve....
        Kevin

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Tryagn5 View Post
          You are running to slow. I would try to cut your bead size down for the root, increase the speed. Also for the cap do it in one pass....ie more weeve....
          Kevin
          a weave on the cap would be carrying a ton of metal.. its a pretty good size space shoulder to shoulder. what does it hurt to try tho right?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tryagn5 View Post
            You are running to slow. I would try to cut your bead size down for the root, increase the speed. Also for the cap do it in one pass....ie more weeve....
            Kevin
            1 pass on a 6g position? That aint gonna happen.On the root try a 3/32 land and a 3/32 gap.

            95 amps is too hot for a cap.

            You need way more practice running stringers.It just dont happen overnight.

            Comment


            • #7
              Way I do it....

              Originally posted by fabricator View Post
              1 pass on a 6g position? That aint gonna happen.On the root try a 3/32 land and a 3/32 gap.

              95 amps is too hot for a cap.

              You need way more practice running stringers.It just dont happen overnight.
              On a pipe of that wall, looks to be 7/16 or 1/2 wall, absolutely do the cap in one pass. Root would be 3/32 run 80-85 amps, rest would be 1/8 rod at 100-110 amps. Cap pass would be 1/8 90-95 amps. The probelm he is having is learning how to stack the passes, plus he wanders while welding, causing himself difficulty. IE he building mounds with the weld. You can see in the root pass he is moving to slowly and having a lot of burn through. Also because he is using 3/32 I would bet he is running through the rod quickly causing him to have to start and stop a lot. However this is just my O2, as I do not weld pipe much anymore...but I did a ton of it in the past.
              Kevin

              Comment


              • #8
                Its not so much the wall thickness as it is the fact that the pipe is on a 45degree slope.On a 5g I would probably cap with 1 pass, depends on what the company would allow me to get away with as far as the width of the bead.

                He stated he is using 3/32 7018 on fill and cap.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Your right 6g...

                  Originally posted by fabricator View Post
                  Its not so much the wall thickness as it is the fact that the pipe is on a 45degree slope.On a 5g I would probably cap with 1 pass, depends on what the company would allow me to get away with as far as the width of the bead.

                  He stated he is using 3/32 7018 on fill and cap.
                  I dont know why but I thought he was doing 5g. He will need to do the cap in a couple of passes. Still think he should be running 1/8 rod on that thickness at least for the cap. Anyhow I think his biggest probelm is not running the stringer in a uniform shape and flowing the lines. I build a shelf for each pass to lay in. Makes capping much easier.
                  Kevin

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Before trying to cap with one pass you need to check the WPS to see what the maximum bead width allowed is. Most of the time its not a matter of if you can or cannot carry that much metal because the WPS doesnt allow it.

                    Most WPS's have a 5/8 max bead width for SMAW.

                    I agree with above posts that your travel speed on the root pass is to slow, and you need to have the least amount of starts and stops as possible. As for the cap, it seems like your having trouble keeping your beads on a straight line, you could always grind a line to follow.

                    Just keep practicing and you will get it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hale Yeah Fabrication View Post
                      Before trying to cap with one pass you need to check the WPS to see what the maximum bead width allowed is. Most of the time its not a matter of if you can or cannot carry that much metal because the WPS doesnt allow it.

                      Most WPS's have a 5/8 max bead width for SMAW.

                      I agree with above posts that your travel speed on the root pass is to slow, and you need to have the least amount of starts and stops as possible. As for the cap, it seems like your having trouble keeping your beads on a straight line, you could always grind a line to follow.

                      Just keep practicing and you will get it.
                      Yep! I agree. And I use the "grinding a line" technique always.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Gravity is killing you right now. It looks like most of the problems with your cap are when you are in the near vertical postion. Remember your puddle is a liquid and you will have to adjust your travel speed and your weave as you move more and more vertically. Also remember as you get into a near overhead or overhead position to close up your gap between your electrode and the puddle as surface tension is the only thing keeping that weld puddle on the work instead of the floor. You almost have to push the puddle with the tip of your rod. If it gets too hot and trys to burn through pull your arc length longer for a split second to freeze the puddle then resume. Also make sure when you do stop to fill your crater.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hale Yeah Fabrication View Post
                          Before trying to cap with one pass you need to check the WPS to see what the maximum bead width allowed is. Most of the time its not a matter of if you can or cannot carry that much metal because the WPS doesnt allow it.

                          Most WPS's have a 5/8 max bead width for SMAW.

                          I agree with above posts that your travel speed on the root pass is to slow, and you need to have the least amount of starts and stops as possible. As for the cap, it seems like your having trouble keeping your beads on a straight line, you could always grind a line to follow.

                          Just keep practicing and you will get it.
                          I can grind a line to follow on my practice cupons but noy on the test. I ran it pretty well today, i'll post some pics in a bit. I adjusted the height on the stand so it ws a little lower and i slowed my self down and now i am just a little too flat on the top, but i think it more of a matter of me going too fast for the top. I also took a little more time inbetween passes and forced myself to relax and to refocus. seemed to help

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've seen worse caps.

                            You have the right idea with relax. You need a steady progression to maintain consistant fill. The other thing a lot of guys miss is the heat. The coupon is small. It gets hot. The puddle ends up more fluid and harder to control.

                            If a grinder is permitted, I tell guys to take a little time between passes to take a good look after removing slag, and clean up with the grinder. Smooth it out, make sure there is no undercut to chase, and be sure there is a clean line to follow. I usually use a 4.5" with a hard wheel that has the edge worn down so I can run it along and leave a perfect, smooth U for the next pass. Doesn't usually take much. The time this takes also helps keep the heat down. Keep it below 500F on the fill and cover, preferably below 400F (when the pass is done, check the temp about an inch from the bead)

                            Another tip is start and finish past center. Start about 5 to 10 degrees before the bottom and run about 5 to 10 degrees past the top, both ways. This gives a little overlap. Clean the starts and stops from the first side with a grinder before starting the other side. On this pipe, 10 degrees is about 3/8" at the OD

                            Also, remember gravity. As you progress up, the direction the puddle pulls changes, but is always generally toward the lower piece. You might try pushing away from the lower piece a little bit, especially on the cap, and letting gravity help.

                            Also, don't forget to hold at the stop to let it fill. It looks like you started slow, rushed up at the end, and broke off, rather than waiting for the crater to fill.

                            The root needs work. You are pushing too much through.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Not a pipe welder!

                              When doing the root I feel more comfortable with a 3/32-inch gap, and a 3/32-inch land when running 1/8-inch 6010.
                              I think these are 3-inch or maybe 3 1/2-inch pipe. I got to get this computer organized!



                              Comment

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