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Heavy Duty Welding and Cutting Table Design

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Pass-N-Gas View Post
    You could keep the c-iron just allow the ends of the plate to hang over 3" or so ( the depth of your biggest clamp) You could make these out of some 1/2 or 3/4 x 6 plate, drill and tap the bottoms so they could be attached to the c-iron frame with an adjustable bracket. This would prevent them from coming off when you get western with the project.. by spacing your slats (see my center section) this would allow your clamps to be placed just about anywhere on the table..
    I was thinking i would have to put a bolt all the way through the plate and through the C channel to deal with the potential for warping. I thought about putting a half inch bolt clean through and using a smooth top head so it wouldn't interfere with the surface much but do you think I could tap the plate only from underneath and it would still have enough strength to hold?

    I have also had problems finding fasteners that are neither galvanized nor zinc plated (no heavy metal poisoning pls)

    Originally posted by Pass-N-Gas View Post
    This design would allow you to build your cutting end and spark chute under it,or you could even make it a wet table to minimize the smoke going into the house. To save time on the cutting section look at some floor grating material.. Like Jim-TX says good casters and leveling feet are a must as well..
    You would build the cutting end underneath the plate slats forming the table surface? Interesting. Of course you would have to unbolt the slats to reveal it and that could become a pain. I dont need the whole table to be a cutting surface, even what I have designed here is a little overkill. I had thought of downsizing it to only 12" wide with vertical 1/4" plate slats every 4 inches.

    I dont know what you mean so much by a wet table but would be interested to hear.

    As for the casters, I had planned to use these: http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w..._363217_363217

    Comment


    • #17
      here's my thinkin' on the subject for what it worth..

      Originally posted by kraythe View Post
      I was thinking i would have to put a bolt all the way through the plate and through the C channel to deal with the potential for warping. I thought about putting a half inch bolt clean through and using a smooth top head so it wouldn't interfere with the surface much but do you think I could tap the plate only from underneath and it would still have enough strength to hold?

      I have also had problems finding fasteners that are neither galvanized nor zinc plated (no heavy metal poisoning pls)



      You would build the cutting end underneath the plate slats forming the table surface? Interesting. Of course you would have to unbolt the slats to reveal it and that could become a pain. I dont need the whole table to be a cutting surface, even what I have designed here is a little overkill. I had thought of downsizing it to only 12" wide with vertical 1/4" plate slats every 4 inches.

      I dont know what you mean so much by a wet table but would be interested to hear.

      As for the casters, I had planned to use these: http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w..._363217_363217
      Use 3/4 x 6 plate for the table slats, this allows your clamps to come in from both sides for hold down, these are clamped to the HD C-Iron base via the 1/2 tapped holes in the plate (nothing above surface). these holes would hold a tab made of 1/4 x 1 1/2 strap(or similar materials). this allows you to space as needed and or remove the plate for drilling with a drill press for the custom jigging that you mentioned..

      The floor grating is just a suggestion and is normally available at metal salvage yards in small sections. so is a lot of other metal, I normally walk out back before I go in the front door when I buy metal..

      Like you say do your cutting station on one end of the table.. you could have the top of the grating the same height as the welding section of the table (the only thing I suggested you put under the cutting table was a spark chute - to save your socks).. A wet table is just that it has water in it that takes up the smoke and slag..do a youtube search for CNC plasma wet tables.

      Link to metal floor grating for ideas:
      http://www.capesteelgrating.co.za/st...or_grating.php

      Check out this table for ideas:
      http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...4165_200374165

      Castor's should be an all metal design for best results, used in conjunction with leveling feet they will last a long time..

      Here is what I did for my feet 1" plain steel all-thread weld a nut on top for turning and weld a nut on the bottom of the pad for the height adjustment.. before running the bolt down put a piece of pipe over the threads for protection.. these casters were on hand so I used them they tuck under the pad for safe keeping from the sparks..


      Last edited by Pass-N-Gas; 02-02-2010, 10:00 PM.

      Comment


      • #18
        Wow a lot of great ideas. You think thick angle iron is sufficent for the legs? if so they would save a lot of trouble with welding in steel tube. If I used angle iron with straps reinforcement between legs, what size angle do you think would be appropriate for a total weight of 2500 lbs? I like your solution with the casters. That is nice. You could use a drill to crank them down and move them.

        Do you have an idea where i can get non-galvanized, non zinc plated bolts?

        Oh one more thing on the surface mounts, you would tap them from underneath to 1/2" depth? and then just screw the bolts through the c channel into the top plates?

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by kraythe View Post
          Wow a lot of great ideas. You think thick angle iron is sufficent for the legs? if so they would save a lot of trouble with welding in steel tube. If I used angle iron with straps reinforcement between legs, what size angle do you think would be appropriate for a total weight of 2500 lbs? I like your solution with the casters. That is nice. You could use a drill to crank them down and move them.

          Do you have an idea where i can get non-galvanized, non zinc plated bolts?

          Oh one more thing on the surface mounts, you would tap them from underneath to 1/2" depth? and then just screw the bolts through the c channel into the top plates?
          I hope you have some high paying jobs lined out for this table so you can pay my consulting fees for the project..

          1- I am not worried about my 3x3x1/2 angel iron legs collapsing on me , the material was cheep so I used it..

          2- any bolt supply house can take care of you Fastenel, Mcmaster Carr ect..

          3- you can drill and tap the hole all the way through the table just don't let your bolt go above it, use some anti seize before you put it together and it should come apart. This hole will be aprox 1" from the edge of the flange of the C-iron the tab will bridge over the c-iron and clamp the plate to it..

          Just look all of my pics over..It is time to shut off the lights and go home..I'l be back tomorrow..

          Comment


          • #20
            Alas I am only a hobbyist but you have my eternal thanks, not that it means much.

            I have integrated a lot of things you said and I am working on a CAD program that fuses the ideas.I upsized to 3/4 inch plate but slimmed them to 6 inches wide and overhang is now 3 inches. I also am seriously considering the angle iron approach. Although it would be thick to weld half inch steel angle iron, I am pretty sure I could manage it with my torch or pull out my old stick welder. The benefit is that all of the welds are easier of course.

            Right now I am thinking about whether I need a center reinforcing beam underneath the top panels. The quandry is that 3/4 of an inch is stong stuff but 2k# is nothing to laugh at.

            By the way your work on the tool chest with the drawers is awesome. You do them yourself? I had thought of that on the welding table. Have a shelf near the bottom and on top of that a couple slide out drawers for tips, filler rods, electrodes, grinder wheels and so on. I suppose I could get a box pan bender from harbor freight fairly cheaply.

            Oh one more question, you used WD40 to get that finish? That is incredible! it looks beautiful. How did you manage to do that?

            Comment


            • #21
              Why the plate with all of the holes? Whats the purpose of that?

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Spectre32 View Post
                Why the plate with all of the holes? Whats the purpose of that?
                The holes ar half inch diameter and through the plate. The goal of those is to allow the user to slip through heavy duty bolts to rig up Jigs to hold various pieces while being welded to control warping. Its similar to a platten table but much cheaper solution.

                Comment


                • #23
                  What you're describing is getting close to the Stronghand Buildpro table. Not saying you should buy one, but maybe you can get a few more ideas from it:

                  http://www.vansantent.com/welding_ac...ding_table.htm

                  One thing I saw is they sell the top panels separately. I wonder what they cost, but expect it's too much $ to make sense rolling your own table using their panels.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    "Platen Tables"

                    Originally posted by kraythe View Post
                    The holes ar half inch diameter and through the plate. The goal of those is to allow the user to slip through heavy duty bolts to rig up Jigs to hold various pieces while being welded to control warping. Its similar to a platten table but much cheaper solution.
                    Kraythe: Visit www.acorniron.com and look at thier heavy duty platen tables and stands. I think that's what you're looking for.

                    Dave

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
                      Kraythe: Visit www.acorniron.com and look at thier heavy duty platen tables and stands. I think that's what you're looking for.

                      Dave
                      1) I dont have that much money
                      2) What is the fun in buying that instead of buildign your own?

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Drilling all those holes is about as much fun as doubling the load carrying capacity of a 33' travel trailer.

                        At least this "Heavy Duty Welding Table" won't kill someone when it fails due to lack of welding skill/knowledge of fabrication.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I never understood all the hubbub about Acorn tables. I worked on one for a few weeks once. Oh the hold down rods are nice at times, but dropping things through the holes gets old too!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            A motor is about 600 pounds you would have to put the entire car on the table to reach the 2000 pound mark.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
                              Drilling all those holes is about as much fun as doubling the load carrying capacity of a 33' travel trailer.

                              At least this "Heavy Duty Welding Table" won't kill someone when it fails due to lack of welding skill/knowledge of fabrication.
                              I have the metal supplier tap the holes. Much easier that way.

                              As for your other comment, I had planned to put it in an upstairs floor above a kindergarten with only 1x2s for floor framing and rice paper for a surface. So you never know.

                              Originally posted by Daniel View Post
                              A motor is about 600 pounds you would have to put the entire car on the table to reach the 2000 pound mark.
                              Depends on the motor. But I want the table overengineered. I suppose it would have been more accurate to describe the desired deflection at load but naming it at x capacity works.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by kraythe View Post
                                But I want the table overengineered.
                                "The welding area is composed of three 12 inch wide, 1/4 inch thick steel plate"

                                A long way from being over engineered for a table that will hold a 600# on the top

                                Comment

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