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Floating Boat trailer

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  • Floating Boat trailer

    This was the trailer a built for this boat and my concern was to get lower as possible, so a decentrer the axle and the frame. The result was very good, hitch it whit a car ( Vibe) a dint have to get to far down in to the water to let the boat go. What was funny is the trailer was floating when the boat is launch,,,becose of the frame are weldind seal and whit the tire full of air, it's float a bit
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  • #2
    That tongue looks awfully long for the size of the square tube. Unless it’s some magical steel I bet it doesn’t last long if you go over many bumps. Might consider installing a piece of flatbar inside the tube to help matters.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sonora Iron View Post
      That tongue looks awfully long for the size of the square tube. Unless it’s some magical steel I bet it doesn’t last long if you go over many bumps. Might consider installing a piece of flatbar inside the tube to help matters.
      tank's for your reply Sonora, and yes the tongue is long and just at the right longuer. At the end of it, when a hitch, it's weight near 45 pounds and perfect balance, whit 3/4 of the weight on the axle. The tongue is 2x2x1/4'' tick. A check before built this trailer whit other of the same size, and they all built whit this kind of 2x2 long tongue! Ricau

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      • #4
        Might want to plug in some numbers to this calculator to see where you’re at.

        http://metalgeek.com/static/deflection.php

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        • #5
          Looks nice.
          Was it any trouble loading the boat back onto it?

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          • #6
            If I was going to use 2-by-something 1/4-wall tube for the tongue, I would have used 2x4 on edge, rather than 2x2. Other than that, the trailer looks nice.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Hardrock40 View Post
              Looks nice.
              Was it any trouble loading the boat back onto it?
              There was not much trouble loading back in to the trailer becose a don't go to far deep so it doesnt flot

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Desertrider33 View Post
                If I was going to use 2-by-something 1/4-wall tube for the tongue, I would have used 2x4 on edge, rather than 2x2. Other than that, the trailer looks nice.
                tank,s desertider and in this case, I needed to retrieve the hold tongue from the old trailer a rebuild, doesn't cost me a lot $ to have a nice low profil trailer for small run

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                • #9
                  I'm not trying to say anything bad about your trailer, but have you pressure tested it for leaks?

                  If it floats, but will slowly fill with water - then that means it will also slowly release that water and rust out rather quickly.

                  For me, I wouldn't have it retain air at all. I'd put drain holes in the low spots and even in the high side on the tongue and any other "sealed" members. This way it will sink, but it will also drain, and the humidity inside the rails will equalize to that of the atmosphere the trailer is stored in.

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                  • #10
                    Trailer Harmonics

                    Your will need to be aware of the harmonics associated with the length of the tongue. once the Oscillation has started it will be tough to stop.

                    As I work full time in the Marine industry, I see a lot of trailers that literally fall apart from the inside out. Make darn sure the water can get back out of the trailer if it can get it. Drill the weep holes. Especially if it is going to see salt water. Otherwise your beautiful fabrication will be destroyed in just a couple of years.

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                    • #11
                      as long as it works for you. looks good.

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                      • #12
                        Tank you all for the advises and yes it will be wise to drill fews holes to let the humidity get out. It was funny anyway to see the trailer float but a did have a concern about the water get in and doesnt get out and was also thinking whit holes, spray some antirust oil in the tubing,,, but it's gonna be for the next one becose a all ready sold it this summer

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