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Circular Stairs

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  • Circular Stairs

    Here are some stairs we just built. The first picture is in our shop. The rest are where we test fit them. Now it is at powdercoat. I will post more pics when done.. Rails will get pickets ilke deck after powdercoat.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by starweld; 10-28-2009, 05:44 PM.

  • #2
    Very Nice Staircase. How did you make the handrail? Is it one piece?

    Comment


    • #3
      Very Nice Staircase
      gary...

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      • #4
        hand rail is one piece. It is 3/4 sched 40 hand rail. We actually bend it by hand.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by starweld View Post
          hand rail is one piece. It is 3/4 sched 40 hand rail. We actually bend it by hand.
          I'd pay to take part in the handrail bending process- cool. Very nice staircase, house and lake too.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hand Rail

            Very nice job!
            I have a question about the handrail. If this is pipe what causes the diameter variations? The bumps almost make it look like segments that are put together somehow.

            Thanks for sharing!

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            • #7
              I dont totally understand the question, what we do we start with a piece of 3/4'' handrail, and we put it the jaws of a vice(loosely) and start bending it gradually until we have about a 3' radius. By this time we already have our pickets plumb both directions, we start at the top an tack it to the last picket before the landing, then gently bring it down to the next one, tacking as we go. But caution you CAN NOT USE HEAT or the rail will kink. it takes time and patience. I have built about 6 of these and trust me this one looks way better than my first.

              Comment


              • #8
                very nice piece of work!! way to much geometry in that for me to ever tackle a project like it.. maybe in the future again very nice work!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Is this an oversight or a complete disregard of the 1.25" to 2.0" diameter standard for handrail and the 4" opening standard for railings?

                  Must not be a building inspector there, but I bet there's a lawyer waiting for a kid to fall through that.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This is not a commercial application. It is always nice hearing from a know it all.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey Starweld, I figured this one out, "have a question about the handrail. If this is pipe what causes the diameter variations? The bumps almost make it look like segments that are put together somehow".
                      He is asking about the balusters on the upper deck railing. I was so puzzled about that I came back 3 or 4 times to see if he'd repost and clarify his question.
                      Also, here in the wild wild west I have been required to follow the IBC 2009 for handrail size and grippability thing on residential too, so no 3/4" stock for me. I think each inspector has 3 or 4 little bits of code that they think they know and try to stick every contractor on those things, the rest are overlooked due to ignorance, or laziness. Now if I could just figure out those 3 or 4 things before I bid each job...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is not a commercial application.
                        This is a residential standard covered by the International Residential Code, which Indiana has adopted (assuming this is in Indiana). I think it's in sections R311 and R312, but I don't have a code book in front of me.

                        Handrails smaller than 1.25" and larger than 2" in diameter are not as easily gripped with the kind of force necessary to recover balance.

                        Openings larger than 4 inches allow small children to get body parts through, and if much larger, their entire bodies, as well as allowing entanglement of an adult sized leg during a fall.

                        Sorry if I came across as a smart aleck, but honestly, building stairs that don't meet code requirements is the mark of an amateur.

                        Stairs are the second most likely place a person will be injured or killed from an accident in their home, second only to drowning in tubs and pools. They deserve more attention than just making them look good. There are certain dimensions that must be right for them to be safe. Maybe I just care more about this because I used to be the guy that strapped people on a backboard after they fell down the stairs.

                        Don't get me wrong, they look great. But they aren't code compliant and that's going to be bad news one day.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Right On

                          Originally posted by Bodybagger View Post
                          This is a residential standard covered by the International Residential Code, which Indiana has adopted (assuming this is in Indiana). I think it's in sections R311 and R312, but I don't have a code book in front of me.

                          Handrails smaller than 1.25" and larger than 2" in diameter are not as easily gripped with the kind of force necessary to recover balance.

                          Openings larger than 4 inches allow small children to get body parts through, and if much larger, their entire bodies, as well as allowing entanglement of an adult sized leg during a fall.

                          Sorry if I came across as a smart aleck, but honestly, building stairs that don't meet code requirements is the mark of an amateur.

                          Stairs are the second most likely place a person will be injured or killed from an accident in their home, second only to drowning in tubs and pools. They deserve more attention than just making them look good. There are certain dimensions that must be right for them to be safe. Maybe I just care more about this because I used to be the guy that strapped people on a backboard after they fell down the stairs.

                          Don't get me wrong, they look great. But they aren't code compliant and that's going to be bad news one day.
                          Very well stated! How true.

                          Dave

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by starweld View Post
                            This is not a commercial application. It is always nice hearing from a know it all.
                            No residential building codes out there? If that's the case, sweet. Where I live, it's 4" centers, max.

                            Code issues aside, that staircase looks great. I'm itching to try something like that.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Universal Codes !

                              Originally posted by Bodybagger View Post
                              This is a residential standard covered by the International Residential Code, which Indiana has adopted (assuming this is in Indiana). I think it's in sections R311 and R312, but I don't have a code book in front of me.

                              Handrails smaller than 1.25" and larger than 2" in diameter are not as easily gripped with the kind of force necessary to recover balance.

                              Openings larger than 4 inches allow small children to get body parts through, and if much larger, their entire bodies, as well as allowing entanglement of an adult sized leg during a fall.

                              Sorry if I came across as a smart aleck, but honestly, building stairs that don't meet code requirements is the mark of an amateur.

                              Stairs are the second most likely place a person will be injured or killed from an accident in their home, second only to drowning in tubs and pools. They deserve more attention than just making them look good. There are certain dimensions that must be right for them to be safe. Maybe I just care more about this because I used to be the guy that strapped people on a backboard after they fell down the stairs.

                              Don't get me wrong, they look great. But they aren't code compliant and that's going to be bad news one day.
                              Bodybagger, Hi;

                              I think those codes you stated are Universal Codes !
                              We here in Ontario must abide by the Identical Codes !

                              Saftey Above All Else !!

                              .............. Norm :

                              Comment

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