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  • Bench Grinder Stand

    I recently bought a bench grinder, and found it inconvenient to leave it on my workbench. I looked into buying one, but the heavy ones were $100+. I got some old harrow discs from a friend, bought a few feet of 3x3 1/8" square and used 9 gauge steel for the mounting plate. A few hours and some spray paint, and I had me a stand for about 30 bucks. I'm relatively new to the forums, so thought I'd share to get something out there.




    Last edited by rl.robertson; 10-06-2009, 01:48 AM.

  • #2
    Nice stand

    Hi RL, I like the stand but was wondering if you have any problems with it free standing, I have mine bolted down and would like the ability to move it around as i have a small shop. Does it move under pressure or vibration? If not I might look at doing the same thing with mine, I do a bit of polishing on mine also so I apply a reasonable amount of pressure to the stitch rag.
    Cheers Steve

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sparks Downunder View Post
      Hi RL, I like the stand but was wondering if you have any problems freestanding Does it move under pressure or vibration?
      Cheers Steve
      I'd also like to know this, I used a heavy cast plough wheel for one grinder stand and a 20" truck rim for the other.
      Have used a plough disc for a base in other applications many times.

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      • #4
        I use a home made stand that is similar. I grind, polish and clean parts with a wire brush with very little movement. It is very nice to be able to move it around the shop. One thing that seems to help both the grinder and my feet is to buy one of the rubber floor mats. Set the stand/grinder on one edge and you have a place to stand off the cement.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Sparks Downunder View Post
          Does it move under pressure or vibration? If not I might look at doing the same thing with mine
          This turned out to be really sturdy. If I'm putting lot's of pressure on the grinder, I just put one foot on the base of the stand to keep it from potentially moving. The disc ended up being heavy enough for me to keep it stable, but you could always weld heavy plate inside of the concave part of the disc (underneath) for extra weight.

          Originally posted by Pitalplace View Post
          One thing that seems to help both the grinder and my feet is to buy one of the rubber floor mats. Set the stand/grinder on one edge and you have a place to stand off the cement.
          Great idea for the mat! I may have to do that with mine.
          Last edited by rl.robertson; 10-06-2009, 05:38 PM.

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          • #6
            sounds good

            Thanks for the reply, i will have to modify mine it will be great to get it out of the way when I need to as my shop is really small .
            Thanks, Steve

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            • #7
              Another option is to use a large (like the ones off my GMC van) disc brake rotor. Those things are very heavy and you can weld the tubing to the top where the axle used to go. Since my auto parts guys don't take them as a core, I find getting rid of them is a pain, and this makes a good way to recycle them.
              Miller AC/DC Thunderbolt
              Lincoln 175HD
              Smith AW1, Dillion Mark III, Smith Little Torch

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              • #8
                nice way of re useing old junk

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                • #9
                  Picture

                  Hey would like to see picture of bench in back ground like the shelf under the bench with 3/4 no9 fem (expanded metal)nice
                  Vernon
                  Last edited by Vernon; 11-27-2009, 05:20 PM.

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