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  • Welding an engine block, correct procedure?

    Hello,

    I need to weld a crack on a Farmall Cub engine block. If anyone is familiar, it is the casting that is typically cracked when the tractor is pulled by its front axle. Apparently, someone has attempted to repair it on the tractor in the past and this will need to be ground off to start over. It looks like they might have used a nickle rod. I am planning to remove the engine from the tractor for this repair.

    Question: What is the correct procedure to do this and can I use a MIG or should I go back with a rod and if so, AC or DC-/+? What about pre-heating to prevent additional cracking? I know I need to weld it slowly and not rush the job. Can anyone recommend a good rod that I might be able to find at my LWS?

    Thanks in advance.

    Vinnie in NC

  • #2
    Originally posted by VinnieNC View Post
    Hello,

    I need to weld a crack on a Farmall Cub engine block. If anyone is familiar, it is the casting that is typically cracked when the tractor is pulled by its front axle. Apparently, someone has attempted to repair it on the tractor in the past and this will need to be ground off to start over. It looks like they might have used a nickle rod. I am planning to remove the engine from the tractor for this repair.

    Question: What is the correct procedure to do this and can I use a MIG or should I go back with a rod and if so, AC or DC-/+? What about pre-heating to prevent additional cracking? I know I need to weld it slowly and not rush the job. Can anyone recommend a good rod that I might be able to find at my LWS?

    Thanks in advance.

    Vinnie in NC

    Best practice involves stripping down to a bare block, preheat to about 1200 F , OA weld with cast iron filler and flux, and then post heat to about 1500 for an hour or so then let slowly cool.

    Notice I didnt say the easiest, but its the best.

    -Aaron
    "Better Metalworking Through Research"

    Miller Dynasty 300DX
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
    Miller Millermatic Passport

    Miller Spot Welder
    Motor-Guard stud welder

    Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by makoman1860 View Post
      Best practice involves stripping down to a bare block, preheat to about 1200 F , OA weld with cast iron filler and flux, and then post heat to about 1500 for an hour or so then let slowly cool.

      Notice I didnt say the easiest, but its the best.

      -Aaron
      Does this method require welding only an inch at a time and peening like SMAW requires?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Anti-GMAW View Post
        Does this method require welding only an inch at a time and peening like SMAW requires?

        Nope, it doesnt require crutches or band-aids.
        "Better Metalworking Through Research"

        Miller Dynasty 300DX
        Miller Dynasty 200DX
        Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
        Miller Millermatic Passport

        Miller Spot Welder
        Motor-Guard stud welder

        Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

        Comment


        • #5
          To weld or not to weld

          Although you can repair a cast iron block by welding, most repairs are made using plugs. Generally a series of holes is drilled along the crack, tapped and then plugs are screwed into the tapped holes. An internal bladder can be used inside the block in order to prevent leaking. This technique can also be used on cylinder heads. Of course, being welders, why would we want to take the easy way out. Good luck on your repair either way.
          Dynasty 200DX, first generation
          Makita 5" grinder
          Makita 14" abrasive saw
          IR SS5L compressor
          Whole bunch of hand/air tools.
          and a wish list a mile long

          Comment


          • #6
            Welcome to LOCK-N-STITCH Inc. - Cast iron repair is our specialty

            Welcome to LOCK-N-STITCH Inc.
            Cast iron repair is our specialty
            We can fix it or you can fix it; either way, we can help

            http://www.locknstitch.com/

            LOCK-N-STITCH Inc. specializes in all aspects of the repair of cracked and damaged cast iron and other cast metals. LNS manufactures crack and thread repair products, provides training in crack repair techniques and maintains a full-service repair department that performs repairs all over the world and has the benefit of over thirty years of experience.

            Whether you want to metal stitch a damaged casting yourself, want our professionals to do the job, or need an on-site consultant to advise and train your personnel during the repair, we have the supplies, the skills, and the people to assist you. Quite simply: we can fix it or you can fix it.

            Please review our web site and see what we have to offer to you and your company. Our site is organized into eight main sections: Metal Stitching, Thread Repair Inserts, Stitching Products, Service, Training, Technical Support, Cast Iron Welding and Repair Examples. Visit the ones that interest you the most and let us know how we can be of help.

            We manufacture and sell products covered under US Patent No. 5,379,505; 5,417,532; 5,499,892; 5,562,371; 5,944,303; 6,071,051; 6,126,367; 6,212,750; 6,261,039; 6,382,893; 6,435,788; 6,439,817; 6,572,315; 6,725,518;

            Australian Patent No. 684525; Russian Patent No. 2137581. Many additional international patents have issued and are pending.

            Thank you for the visit. Please come again.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Harvuskong View Post
              Welcome to LOCK-N-STITCH Inc.
              Cast iron repair is our specialty
              We can fix it or you can fix it; either way, we can help

              http://www.locknstitch.com/

              LOCK-N-STITCH Inc. specializes in all aspects of the repair of cracked and damaged cast iron and other cast metals. LNS manufactures crack and thread repair products, provides training in crack repair techniques and maintains a full-service repair department that performs repairs all over the world and has the benefit of over thirty years of experience.

              Whether you want to metal stitch a damaged casting yourself, want our professionals to do the job, or need an on-site consultant to advise and train your personnel during the repair, we have the supplies, the skills, and the people to assist you. Quite simply: we can fix it or you can fix it.

              Please review our web site and see what we have to offer to you and your company. Our site is organized into eight main sections: Metal Stitching, Thread Repair Inserts, Stitching Products, Service, Training, Technical Support, Cast Iron Welding and Repair Examples. Visit the ones that interest you the most and let us know how we can be of help.

              We manufacture and sell products covered under US Patent No. 5,379,505; 5,417,532; 5,499,892; 5,562,371; 5,944,303; 6,071,051; 6,126,367; 6,212,750; 6,261,039; 6,382,893; 6,435,788; 6,439,817; 6,572,315; 6,725,518;

              Australian Patent No. 684525; Russian Patent No. 2137581. Many additional international patents have issued and are pending.

              Thank you for the visit. Please come again.

              Yeah,
              Ive seen that repair.....in fact I have seen it fail quite often on warranty parts. I guess it has its place, but id put it below a weldment.
              "Better Metalworking Through Research"

              Miller Dynasty 300DX
              Miller Dynasty 200DX
              Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
              Miller Millermatic Passport

              Miller Spot Welder
              Motor-Guard stud welder

              Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

              Comment

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