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  • #31
    Originally posted by kiwi View Post
    I hope all goes well for you tomorrow. It sounds like you have things sorted out. Post some pictures after it is done and be careful.
    Nick
    I'll second that. Good luck and be safe.I'm sure you'll do just fine. Btw when I reply to a post like this I hope the poster takes constructive critism well . Most of us just don't want to see you get yourself in a pickle.

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    • #32
      they wouldn't allow any work there today, so they pushed the crane off until wednsday. i'll be up there 5am tomorrow.

      heres a pic from saturday

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      • #33
        Just for fun. How did you weld them?

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        • #34
          mig. ended up to be 44 linear inches of 3/8" fillet around each pad.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by HawkerMetalworks View Post
            mig. ended up to be 44 linear inches of 3/8" fillet around each pad.
            If you get time and think about it, I for one would be very interested in seeing a picture of the padeyes. I have done this type of work my entire career. Ive come to the conclusion there is more than one way to design a padeye. Im confident Ive seen it all, but you just never know. Ive seen padeyes that made me want to leave the county before the pick was made, and Ive seen engineered padeyes that just floored me on how stout they were designed. Interesting work! (To me anyway)

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            • #36
              One of the biggest failures I was ever around was an engineered deal, I asked before we did it, had a gut feeling but they the ones with the degree. Crap happens fast though.

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              • #37
                heres the uphill (the 3/4" plate was welded at the shop)


                and the overhead

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                • #38
                  Thanks for posting the pictures!
                  Im a little surprised that you didnt go with gussets. I think it was you, or maybe someone else posted about using a T shaped padeye, I was all for that! Ive welded lots of engineered padeyes made from T shape. Just cut two slots in the top for the bail of the shackle to insert into. Cut a hole in the web for the shackle pin.

                  I know youre a little defensive with some of the comments you have received. But Id add more weld, and a lot hotter! Then again Im not a big fan of Mig, even tho Ive passed numerous structural DT tests with Mig, just not a big fan!

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                  • #39
                    Maybe I should clarify about my statement of making more weld: Not so much on the doubler plate, but the padeye its self. I would also weld all the way around!

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by HawkerMetalworks View Post
                      heres the uphill (the 3/4" plate was welded at the shop)


                      and the overhead

                      I've been reading this as it's unfolded. Not being an engineer or rigger, I didn't have anything to add to the discussion about how many eyes or where, etc.

                      I don't like to rain on anyone's parade and don't take this the wrong way but, I gotta speak up...

                      Hate to be the bearer of bad news, but your fillets joining the two 3/4" plates are WAY UNDERSIZED for that size t-joint. Fillet weld leg lengths should be 3/4" minimum on each leg for that plate size, if that is 3/4" plate. Those look to be about 1/4" to 3/8" fillet legs. You need to go back and put at least 3 more passes in on each fillet to fill them up to proper size, probly more like 5 more passes. I would weld them around the ends too.

                      The vertical tank to plate fillets look good, but are also undersized. They look to be maybe 1/4" leg length at most, hard to tell from the pic. I would go back and put 2 more passes over those. Also, they don't look hot enough to me have good penetration and fusion with that thick plate. Together with being undersized, you have an insufficient strength joint there, in my opinion.

                      The overhead tank to plate fillets don't look like they grabbed very much of the tank. Most of the bead is on the plate, though they do look a little more wet in to the plate than the verticals do. They're too small too. I would go back and put 2 more passes in on those too. Going by the rest of it, I would put in 2 more passes on the horzontal joints on top too.

                      Your beads look nice overall, but overall I don't think you have nearly enough weld in there holding all that together. Please don't be offended or think I'm trying to be over critical. I just don't think those are stuck on there good enough considering what they'll be used for.

                      What wire size and type did you use? What volt/speed settings?

                      On plate that size with a mig, you should be using spray transfer. The beads and spatter around them look like short circuit transfer to me. Not hot enough for that size material to give good penetration and fusion.

                      Crank 'er up and fill 'er up, bro!

                      Standard fillet weld sizing- Each leg of the fillet in a t-joint should be at minimum equal to the thickness of the thinnest plate in the joint.
                      Last edited by Desertrider33; 09-08-2009, 05:29 PM.

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                      • #41
                        the pads welded to the tank i used 045 flux core, the eye plates i used 035 solid wire. the pads had two passes, the first was in a bevel. i was worried about the heat in the tank's wall, and compromising that. the fillet on the 3/4 plate is about 5/16. with the disperssment of the weight, each eye is carrying about 4000 pounds. those would still be a concern?

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                        • #42
                          I personally dont have too much concern with the welds of the doubler plate to the tank, just on sure weld volume alone. My concern is the padeye to doubler plate! I forgot, the riggers plan on laying this tank down correct? If so the forces into these padeyes will change / rotate. If it were just a simple vertical pick, I would still have concerns, but not as much. I think youre living dangerously here!

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by HawkerMetalworks View Post
                            the pads welded to the tank i used 045 flux core, the eye plates i used 035 solid wire. the pads had two passes, the first was in a bevel. i was worried about the heat in the tank's wall, and compromising that. the fillet on the 3/4 plate is about 5/16. with the disperssment of the weight, each eye is carrying about 4000 pounds. those would still be a concern?
                            I'm not an engineer and can't tell you how many lbs of force in what direction your welded joint will hold. If 3/4" plate was the plate size decided on as sufficiently strong for the application, then your welds need to match the plate size, which they fall short of by alot.

                            Now if a 1/4" plate was decided to be sufficiently strong for the application but you used 3/4" because that's what you happened to have around, then a 5/16" fillet size would be strong enough, if applied hot enough to properly penetrate and fuse. The ones pictured don't appear hot enough to me.

                            I like that you beveled the plate to tank joint and put in 2 passes. I wonder how well the bevel filled in, if it penetrated through to the root and how good the fusion was. I wouldn't worry so much about compromising the tank wall by putting in more and hotter passes. There's a huge area there to soak up the heat and you're not going to be blowing through it.

                            I would go back and put in more passes till they're full.

                            I forget what was the number you decided on. How many of these eyes are being used around the tank?

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                            • #44
                              8 anchor points.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by HawkerMetalworks View Post
                                8 anchor points.
                                Wow! Would you please get a picture of how they rig this?
                                8-points? Makes me wonder if theyre not going with what is called a flying W!
                                Which in this case is about 100 x overkill!

                                Comment

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