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another 320 cat bucket

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  • another 320 cat bucket

    I'VE BEEN GONE AWHILE WORKIN ON MY OLD HOUSE (1850s). COUPLE DAYS AGO THE SAME COMPANY THAT HAD ME FIX THEIR LAST "OOPS" CALLED ME ABOUT 0630 AND SAID WE GOT YOU ANOTHER ONE. JUST THOUGHT I'D POST A FEW PICS FOR Y'ALLS VIEWING PLEASURE.................I'M GONNA TRY BEVELING THE SIDES OF THE CORNER ADAPTERS AND THE REST OF THE FRACTURES ALL THE WAY BACK TO THEIR ORIGINS AND THEN PUTTING SOME 1/2" CHAIN RATCHET BINDERS ON TO TRY TO PULL THE TOOTHBAR BACK UP. IF THAT DOESN'T WORK WE'LL HAVE TO GO TO FULL BLOWN SURGERY AND CUT THE TOOTHBAR LOOSE AND REPLACE IT IN THE PROPER POSITION. OF COURSE I'LL BE PUTTING SOME STRAPS AROUND THE CORNERS BEFORE I CALL IT OVER. LONG WEEKEND FOR THE WEEKEND WARRIOR. I'D RATHER DO THIS KIND OF STUFF THAN EAT HOME MADE ICE CREAM! AT LEAST MY HEAD WILL BE CLEAR BEFORE I GO BACK TO THE ER MONDAY
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Originally posted by grnxrymnky View Post
    I'VE BEEN GONE AWHILE WORKIN ON MY OLD HOUSE (1850s). COUPLE DAYS AGO THE SAME COMPANY THAT HAD ME FIX THEIR LAST "OOPS" CALLED ME ABOUT 0630 AND SAID WE GOT YOU ANOTHER ONE. JUST THOUGHT I'D POST A FEW PICS FOR Y'ALLS VIEWING PLEASURE.................I'M GONNA TRY BEVELING THE SIDES OF THE CORNER ADAPTERS AND THE REST OF THE FRACTURES ALL THE WAY BACK TO THEIR ORIGINS AND THEN PUTTING SOME 1/2" CHAIN RATCHET BINDERS ON TO TRY TO PULL THE TOOTHBAR BACK UP. IF THAT DOESN'T WORK WE'LL HAVE TO GO TO FULL BLOWN SURGERY AND CUT THE TOOTHBAR LOOSE AND REPLACE IT IN THE PROPER POSITION. OF COURSE I'LL BE PUTTING SOME STRAPS AROUND THE CORNERS BEFORE I CALL IT OVER. LONG WEEKEND FOR THE WEEKEND WARRIOR. I'D RATHER DO THIS KIND OF STUFF THAN EAT HOME MADE ICE CREAM! AT LEAST MY HEAD WILL BE CLEAR BEFORE I GO BACK TO THE ER MONDAY
    Looks like you got your work cut out for you. Just a question. Did they bring the whole machine? I have some farm equipment and have done some stupid things and after grinding, etc, I was able to use the machine to apply pressure to move my goof up back into place prior to welding. Saved a lot of chain and binder work.

    Comment


    • #3
      NAW MAN! THE MACHINE WAS STILL ON SITE AND THE BUCKET WAS AT THEIR SHOP/YARD. I PICKED IT UP N/C. THAT'S ONE THING THEY LIKE ABOUT ME. I'LL ALSO BRING IT BACK N/C. I HAVE ANOTHER OPTION...I HAVE A HYD CYL ABOUT A 5" BORE x 24" STROKE. I CAN WELD A COUPLE HOOKS OR THE LIKE AND USE MY TRACTORS HYDRAULICS TO TRY AND PULL IT BACK. I HAVE A STRANGE FEELING THAT IT'LL HAVE TO BE CUT APART AND PUT BACK. I'LL BE SURE TO POST SOME PICS OF THE PROCESS.

      Comment


      • #4
        Save yourself the time and trouble of trying to pull it back. We just had the bottom collapse on our bucket for our hitachi 450. We had the machine at the shop and we still found it easier to cut the plate out and reweld, add some wear pads and hard-face.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by grnxrymnky View Post
          I HAVE A HYD CYL ABOUT A 5" BORE x 24" STROKE. I CAN WELD A COUPLE HOOKS OR THE LIKE AND USE MY TRACTORS HYDRAULICS TO TRY AND PULL IT BACK. I HAVE A STRANGE FEELING THAT IT'LL HAVE TO BE CUT APART AND PUT BACK. I'LL BE SURE TO POST SOME PICS OF THE PROCESS.
          that's the engineering i'm talkin about!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Agcadmin1 View Post
            Save yourself the time and trouble of trying to pull it back. We just had the bottom collapse on our bucket for our hitachi 450. We had the machine at the shop and we still found it easier to cut the plate out and reweld, add some wear pads and hard-face.
            What he said. You'll waste more time trying to get it back in shape than you would just to cut it out and replace it. The metal around the tooth bar is already weakened and worn from being bent. Find out what kind of digging they do, then add the proper hardfacing pattern.

            Comment


            • #7
              it got cut off

              i went ahead and cut the toothbar off last night. i think it's gonna make a much cleaner and better repair to do it like that. i will probably post some pics tomorrow when i get to the hospital. that's where i go to rest -- feed the cows, feed the goats, feed the pigs, the chickens, work on the old house, cut the field, cut the grass!

              Comment


              • #8
                more pics

                the tooth bar is off and the scrap metal is cut from it. i've started beveling everything in prep for reassembly. i'll be cutting the side plates out 2 inches or so above the failed welds/cracks (straight cuts and rounded in the corners) and replacing with t-1 or grade 50, 100% welded back in, and probably strapped around to the bottom of the tooth bar (wyo?) just to give it a little more support. NO my shop is not air conditioned nor is it safe to occupy haha!
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've often wondered about forcing busted sections back into position to weld. Seems to me that if it is anything tougher than mild steel you would be locking in stresses that are trying to pull your welds apart even before the owner puts the part to work again. Cutting and welding as you're doing seems like the way to go.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    it makes you wonder sometimes how the operator of the machine can realy break stuff sometimes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      all done

                      finished the repair last night about 2000 hrs and delivered it this morning. i couldn't really tell if the owner was happy or not with the repair. he paused and looked at it for a minute and said "i'm sure it'll be fine," and asked for an invoice, he disappeared and came back about ten minutes later with a check -- guess that means he was satisfied.
                      of course the added metal was a different color than the painted/rusted existing metal but give that a few days and it'll be hard to tell the difference.
                      i thought i did a good job but it kind of leaves me confused when the owner doesn't break down and cry with joy -- LOL!
                      oh well, i'll post some pics in the next day or so, i left my camera in the shop this am and i'm at the hospital now.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Will be interested in seeing the pics, sure appears you done it right.

                        May I ask how many hours you had in the job? What replacement material did you finally use?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          time and materials

                          from start to finish it goes something like this ... APPROXIMATELY

                          clean-up and prep -- 1 hour (remove mud and concrete etc)
                          cut toothbar off and remove old metals (lots of weld holding those old side plate pieces on) -- 3 hour
                          bevel toothbar -- 2 hours
                          cut bad metal from bucket sides and bevel for new welds -- 2 hours
                          cut new pieces and bevel -- 1 hour
                          fit toothbar and tack into place 1 hour
                          burn up about 25 lbs of 5/32 7018 -- 7 hours

                          those times are approx with a total of 17 hours. it could have been done faster, especially if i could ever figure out my 12vs, heck, while i'm at it i need to figure out the stick welding thing too. the only portion i had any help with was lifting the toothbar into place. the rest of the moving and flipping (via gantry crane) and so on was a solo effort.

                          one day i'd like to get an air gouge setup and maybe speed up some of the disassembly that i have to do on these projects.

                          i'm also mentally working on a better lift system -- one that is only supported by my three point hitch and not operated by it i.e. a lift that is more like a backhoe boom resting on an axle and the cylinder will be operated with the tractors hydraulic pump. tractor is a ford 5610 if your wondering. if i ever get started i'll post pics of that project as well.

                          my 12 vs suitcase frustrates me because it seems that whenever i go out of position i have to reset the wirespeed, but that's a whole 'nother post.

                          blah blah blah ...................

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Quite an effort, I imagine it would have taken me longer. Being semi retired I work at my own pace and adjust the time accordingly. Folks understand that going in or the job is a no go.

                            Just curious, what type metal was used for the repair?

                            Thanks, appreciate the post

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Cac

                              Originally posted by grnxrymnky View Post
                              from start to finish it goes something like this ... APPROXIMATELY

                              clean-up and prep -- 1 hour (remove mud and concrete etc)
                              cut toothbar off and remove old metals (lots of weld holding those old side plate pieces on) -- 3 hour
                              bevel toothbar -- 2 hours
                              cut bad metal from bucket sides and bevel for new welds -- 2 hours
                              cut new pieces and bevel -- 1 hour
                              fit toothbar and tack into place 1 hour
                              burn up about 25 lbs of 5/32 7018 -- 7 hours

                              those times are approx with a total of 17 hours. it could have been done faster, especially if i could ever figure out my 12vs, heck, while i'm at it i need to figure out the stick welding thing too. the only portion i had any help with was lifting the toothbar into place. the rest of the moving and flipping (via gantry crane) and so on was a solo effort.

                              one day i'd like to get an air gouge setup and maybe speed up some of the disassembly that i have to do on these projects.

                              i'm also mentally working on a better lift system -- one that is only supported by my three point hitch and not operated by it i.e. a lift that is more like a backhoe boom resting on an axle and the cylinder will be operated with the tractors hydraulic pump. tractor is a ford 5610 if your wondering. if i ever get started i'll post pics of that project as well.

                              my 12 vs suitcase frustrates me because it seems that whenever i go out of position i have to reset the wirespeed, but that's a whole 'nother post.

                              blah blah blah ...................
                              If your using the 225 Bobcat and 12VS, that's part of the problem. They didn't have the best CV ouput. Also, if you do get a CAC torch, consider upgrading to a Trailblazer for both wire feed and CAC. The 225 just doesn't "cut it."

                              That's some serious metal, when doing bucket repairs, and you really need to ensure that your welds will hold. A lot of these metals are low-alloy, high tensile steels with yield strengths of 90,000 psi or higher and welding/repair needs to be approached accordingly.

                              CV out put on the 225, especially if hardfacing, can create more frustrations than satisfactory results. Seriously, consider a TB Air-Pak if you're going to be doing this on a regular basis.

                              Anxious to see some picks of your work.

                              Dave

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