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Finished Welded Art

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  • #16
    Originally posted by seattle smitty View Post
    Have you ever photo-documented one of these projects beginning to end? Then a clod like me, lacking any artistic talent whatever, could get a clue as to what is entailed in the making of your small masterpiece. I don't mean instruction in technique, just a means whereby we could appreciate the process as well as the finished piece, which is so detailed I can hardly begin to take it all in.
    Seattle Smitty;
    Here is a Facebook site where I have started a photo thread on a repeat of the Beet Harvester project.

    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?ai...2&l=8862cd394e

    Let me know if you can't get to it. kmomaha@cox.net

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    • #17
      SO sweet dude! I've checked out you work before, I dig it a lot!

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by UH60LCHIEF View Post
        Cool.... Very very cool. How did you get the coloring?
        I wash the piece in 100% muriatic acid (available at any hardware store). Then rinse it with clear water. It then flashes to rust as it is drying, or I can hasten it by spraying with vinegar. Even let it sit overnight. You get the most beautiful rust. If I don't want a part rusted. I use an artists brush and paint the rust with phosphoric acid (naval jelly) available from any autoparts store or K-mart. For large quantities see: <click here> This converts the iron oxide to zinc oxide. Basically galvanizing it. Gun blueing can give you black, or I use a jewelers torch and just burn it a little. You can also get blue if you clean the part to bare metal and use a torch on it. Once I am hapy with the color I spray it with about 4 coats of clear acrylic enamel (Rustoleum). The paint will darken the piece so take that into account.

        If it gets dull after years of display I disassemble from the wood base and give it a real quick bath with lacquer thinner, let it dry, then respray it.

        Thanks for the acolades! I also really enjoy looking at other artistic creations on this site, including the full size useful and functional creations. Ken

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        • #19
          Originally posted by jdustu View Post
          SO sweet dude! I've checked out you work before, I dig it a lot!
          Looked over your creations. I assume the refrences were yours. Very artistic. I just don't have the abstract ability for the smooth lines I see in your work. Very nice. Very different. I started out with some sparkplug art and a few things similar to yours. Things kept growing. I like the high detailing. Result of my 35 years of drafting and mechanical designing. One piece that was popular that I did was a man standing at an engine stand with an engine block made out of hex nuts for cylinders etc. Engine stand made out of sq. key stock. ... thanks again...Ken

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          • #20
            Originally posted by kmomaha View Post
            I wash the piece in 100% muriatic acid (available at any hardware store). Then rinse it with clear water. It then flashes to rust as it is drying, or I can hasten it by spraying with vinegar. Even let it sit overnight. You get the most beautiful rust. If I don't want a part rusted. I use an artists brush and paint the rust with phosphoric acid (naval jelly) available from any autoparts store or K-mart. For large quantities see: <click here> This converts the iron oxide to zinc oxide. Basically galvanizing it. Gun blueing can give you black, or I use a jewelers torch and just burn it a little. You can also get blue if you clean the part to bare metal and use a torch on it. Once I am hapy with the color I spray it with about 4 coats of clear acrylic enamel (Rustoleum). The paint will darken the piece so take that into account.

            If it gets dull after years of display I disassemble from the wood base and give it a real quick bath with lacquer thinner, let it dry, then respray it.

            Thanks for the acolades! I also really enjoy looking at other artistic creations on this site, including the full size useful and functional creations. Ken

            Thanks for the tips on how you get the different colorings. I've been wondering how some people get their colors, and this helps a lot.

            Comment


            • #21
              Amazing

              I do oil based clay sculpture myself and have always wanted to try some metal sculpture. Barely have the patience for clay any more these days though let alone forming metal and cutting little intricate pieces to fit properly. You truly are an artist and do great work. keep it up.

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              • #22
                Really nice work!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by kmomaha View Post
                  Looked over your creations. I assume the refrences were yours. Very artistic. I just don't have the abstract ability for the smooth lines I see in your work. Very nice. Very different. I started out with some sparkplug art and a few things similar to yours. Things kept growing. I like the high detailing. Result of my 35 years of drafting and mechanical designing. One piece that was popular that I did was a man standing at an engine stand with an engine block made out of hex nuts for cylinders etc. Engine stand made out of sq. key stock. ... thanks again...Ken
                  Thanks man It's cool seeing so many different styles out there using the same medium. I'm lucky that I can see the abstract in things, because I don't have the eye or the patience for the AMAZING detail you have! Blows my mind

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                  • #24
                    amazing detail you must have the patients of a saint,and of course lots of good old fashioned talent.great gob.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Very Wicked, thanks for sharing !!

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