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Trying to fix warped wedling table

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  • #16
    It is nice to have a flat welding table, in time they all seem to develop low spots. With welding dogs, clips, brackets, and whatever to them, then grinding them all back off, wallah low spot!
    Caution!
    These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Sonora Iron View Post
      It is nice to have a flat welding table, in time they all seem to develop low spots. With welding dogs, clips, brackets, and whatever to them, then grinding them all back off, wallah low spot!

      Which is exactly why I find no use for the galvanize...may as well be painted IMO
      A welding table is a tool... not something to worry about keeping the finish nice.

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      • #18
        right on

        a table is a tool, so is a big hammer, both of which meet often, i built mine 25 yrs ago out of a 4x5x1.5 plate which was straight when new, not now and never will be, i use it

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        • #19
          A nice flat surface to work on is very convenient, makes fabing things up fast. But if you cannot work on an uneven surface you’re in big trouble in the fabrication world. The bigger the project, I go from tri-squares, framing squares, 6-inch torpedo levels to 24-inch, and 48-inch carpenter levels, to laser levels, to 98s, to total stations. Batter boards with weighted piano wire. All depends on the tolerances and size of project.


          Forgot to mention: Mercury filled plumb bobs, or at least brass bobs with coffee cans 3/4 filled with oil.
          Last edited by Sonora Iron; 07-14-2009, 11:15 AM.
          Caution!
          These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Sonora Iron View Post
            A nice flat surface to work on is very convenient, makes fabing things up fast. But if you cannot work on an uneven surface you’re in big trouble in the fabrication world. The bigger the project, I go from tri-squares, framing squares, 6-inch torpedo levels to 24-inch, and 48-inch carpenter levels, to laser levels, to 98s, to total stations. Batter boards with weighted piano wire. All depends on the tolerances and size of project.


            Forgot to mention: Mercury filled plumb bobs, or at least brass bobs with coffee cans 3/4 filled with oil.
            Are the cans also used for storing Titanium chips and grindings so you don't have any fires.? That's what the Wicked One does with His chips.!

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            • #21
              Isn't the galvanized surface a really bad thing for welding? Any time you burn it, it will make you sick. I think you have to grind or etch the zinc off before welding on the table anyway, unless you manage to never cook the surface, which seems impossible.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by lens42 View Post
                Isn't the galvanized surface a really bad thing for welding? Any time you burn it, it will make you sick. I think you have to grind or etch the zinc off before welding on the table anyway, unless you manage to never cook the surface, which seems impossible.
                The galvanized top is only a potential problem if parts are welded to it to secure them for fabrication. Used outdoors (as I do) it hasn't been and I don't think will be a problem. Clamping, using magnets or weighting parts down usually presents no problem. I may even drill and tap threads in a few holes for the ability to screw down parts. There are already a few spots where things were welded on and then the welds ground off. Overall the galvanization just keeps it from rusting. If it becomes a worry, I'll flip the top.

                One end has been freed up from the stitch welds that held the top to the frame and I'm looking for a way to jack it up 3/16" or so from the frame to insert a few shims. Initially, I'll try to flatten the top that way. I'll advise.
                Last edited by Dmaxer; 07-25-2009, 12:58 AM. Reason: spelling
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                • #23
                  is there some purpose for welding the top to the frame? my welding table top is 1/2" thick and is roughly a 3' x 6'. it just sits free floating on the table frame that i made. the top weighs like 350 pounds by itself-- it never moves. where could it possibly go? even if i wanted to slide the top across the frame, it takes a monumental effort. welding the top to the table seems pointless.

                  after you cut the top free and straighten it, i would just let it lay on the frame and use it that way.
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                  • #24
                    It's fixed. I cut out about 44 welds, all except for those attaching the top to the center crosspiece. Used a bottle jack from the end crosspieces halfway up the legs to raise each corner and insert shims where necessary. I liked the idea of using weighted wire (I used a length of .035 mig wire) held off the table by small blocks at each end to check flatness. I had to readjust the shims a couple of times until I got it right. Thanks Sonora Iron for that suggestion. I don't intend to do any more welding between the top and the frame for now. If it ever warps again, it'll be easier to adjust with it like this.

                    Thanks to everyone who responded. This members of this site have a wealth of experience and when they share it, there is no better advice.
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                    O/A Rig, Enco 4x6 bandsaw, etc.

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