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Cure for butter fingered Airman

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  • Cure for butter fingered Airman

    I run a Fuels Laboratory, and letís just say that the caliber of men that collect samples for me lack the hand eye coordination that god gave a Tyrannosaurus Rex. As a result the collection jars we use have been dropping faster than the value of a dollar. Answer...frickin weld something! This was a very simple project but for those of you that have ever had to engineer around incompetence, I thought you might appreciate this.
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  • #2
    neat.. why the bolts on the bottom..?
    Jim
    sigpicJim Young
    www.JimYo.com
    www.youtube.com/jimyo01

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    • #3
      Have to be able to remove the jar.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CaseyMckinney View Post
        I run a Fuels Laboratory, and letís just say that the caliber of men that collect samples for me lack the hand eye coordination that god gave a Tyrannosaurus Rex. As a result the collection jars we use have been dropping faster than the value of a dollar. Answer...frickin weld something! This was a very simple project but for those of you that have ever had to engineer around incompetence, I thought you might appreciate this.
        I collect fuel samples in the refinery and we use plastic coated glass bottles that are used with a Texas Sampler. Even if you drop them they don't shatter...Bob
        Bob Wright

        Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
        http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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        • #5
          Working for the Uncle S often means DIY or wait.

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          • #6
            Can you handle it.

            It does look like if it's droped the jar could still break. But at least there is a big handle. The guestion is has that been droped since the jar cage was fabricated.???
            Bob

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            • #7
              Hmmm

              As I recall from the sticker at the gas pump:

              It is unlawful to put fuel in glass or unapproved containers.. I know it is a DOT violation as well..

              Not to mention a down right safety hazard, do like aametalmaster does and collect it in a plastic coated bottle (AKA "Approved Container) before someone gets hurt..

              Play it safe!
              Steve

              Bobcat 250EFI

              Syncrowave 250

              Millermatic 350P

              Hypertherm 1250

              A Bunch of tools

              And a forklift to move the heavy stuff with..

              Torchmate 2x2 CNC Plasma

              It's Miller Time - Get Back To Work!

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              • #8
                OK maybe I should have given more background. This particular sample is collected under pressure so the trouble comes from the jar shooting out of their hands, thus the handle and cage. As far as someone dropping it after that, the cage is lined with friction tape and has over a 1/4" annular space. This should be able to handle a short drop. The problem, however, was not to survive a fall rather keep the men from dropping the sample in the first place. I regard to the plastic container that would be a no-go. First off we have to be able to visually check for water, so you have to be able to see through the. Consider this a piece of lab glass for the field. Furthermore some of the fuels we deal with would eat through plastic. Lastly DOD regulations require a 1 quart glass jar. No offence to anyone in the DOT.
                Last edited by CaseyMckinney; 07-01-2009, 10:52 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by urch55 View Post
                  It does look like if it's droped the jar could still break. But at least there is a big handle. The guestion is has that been droped since the jar cage was fabricated.???
                  Bob
                  Putting it in the field today, I will be sure to let you know.

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                  • #10
                    Ahhh but if it IS an approved container, and happens to be made of glass.....

                    Seriously the "stickers" at the pump are mostly a CYA for numbskulls that probably shouldnt be allowed to handle fuel in the first place. Glass fuel checking containers are the norm at the airfield. Not to mention glass fuel level sights, glass globes on fuel/water seperators etc etc. Love the "cage" , somewhere at home I have a Sinclair fuel inspection glass from the '40's , has a wooden handle strapped to is a a couple "bumper" rings on the top and bottom. Ill have to see if I can dig that up.
                    "Better Metalworking Through Research"

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                    • #11
                      Some of our sightglass glass is 3" thick. I would love to see that Sinclair glass. I remember when Sinclair pulled out of Ohio in the 60's. they had a commericial on TV with Dino the dinosaur waving good bye and he had a stick with a hobo pack on it...Bob
                      Bob Wright

                      Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
                      http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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                      • #12
                        Hmmm

                        OK here's my perspective of what I see in the pic:

                        1 - You have added a possible source of ignition into the equation by adding a metal frame work as it bouncing off of the floor / walls ect could create sparks and the contents are highly flammable ..

                        2 - It looks like a standard canning jar to me not a plastic coated glass collection jar..

                        3 - What type of pressure are you dealing with and is the sample collection valve a ball valve or needle valve ?

                        4 -Is there a clamping device to hold the collection jar w / cage at the site of collection? to prevent it from being blown around by the pressure you mentioned..

                        I'm not trying to bust your chops I just don't want to see anybody hurt. I work with high pressure highly explosive materials myself..

                        Safety is a result of teamwork and not by accident..
                        Last edited by Pass-N-Gas; 07-02-2009, 10:38 PM.
                        Steve

                        Bobcat 250EFI

                        Syncrowave 250

                        Millermatic 350P

                        Hypertherm 1250

                        A Bunch of tools

                        And a forklift to move the heavy stuff with..

                        Torchmate 2x2 CNC Plasma

                        It's Miller Time - Get Back To Work!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Aerometalworker View Post
                          Ahhh but if it IS an approved container, and happens to be made of glass.....

                          Seriously the "stickers" at the pump are mostly a CYA for numbskulls that probably shouldnt be allowed to handle fuel in the first place. Glass fuel checking containers are the norm at the airfield. Not to mention glass fuel level sights, glass globes on fuel/water seperators etc etc. Love the "cage" , somewhere at home I have a Sinclair fuel inspection glass from the '40's , has a wooden handle strapped to is a a couple "bumper" rings on the top and bottom. Ill have to see if I can dig that up.
                          Yes I'm familiar with site glasses plastic and glass both..

                          Your "Wooden Handle" would not create sparks would it? the concept behind the plastic coating is to prevent rapid loss of the contents in case the container being broke..

                          I'm just trying to interject some safety here..

                          I recently got a safety memo from a fellow worker...

                          The crew was working on a 200 bbl tank full of condensate and water. the valve needed to be replaced at the bottom of the tank, the idea was to remove the old one and stab the new one.. Well that was great in theory but not in practical application.. no one was hurt and nothing burnt to the ground or blew up.. they cleaned up the mess and went home alive and hopefully a little wiser after the safety personel got a hold of them...
                          Last edited by Pass-N-Gas; 07-02-2009, 11:50 PM.
                          Steve

                          Bobcat 250EFI

                          Syncrowave 250

                          Millermatic 350P

                          Hypertherm 1250

                          A Bunch of tools

                          And a forklift to move the heavy stuff with..

                          Torchmate 2x2 CNC Plasma

                          It's Miller Time - Get Back To Work!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Unbelievable!! A person comes on this site and posts what I think is a creative way of solving a specific problem he has to deal with frequently and we get two pages of safety notices. Don't you think he has considered the safety aspects of what he is doing? He specifically stated that the purpose was to help prevent the sample jar from being blown out of the persons hand when they take the sample. I think it's pretty obvious that if you drop a glass jar whether it's in a cage or not, it will most likely break. Pretty sure this has crossed the OP's mind. As for the restrictions on glass fuel containers, that is for the transportation and storage of gasoline and has nothing to do with this. There's nothing evil about taking a fuel sample in a glass container as it will only be in there for a short time.

                            I for one appreciate what you posted CaseyMckinney. Keep up the good work.

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                            • #15
                              Fear of the safety man has done more to decrease productivity and increase cost than anything else. People are naturally inclined to choose a safe approach to accomplishing a task because it can be painful not to do so, and most of us do not like pain. Wearing a hard hat where there is a danger of falling objects is common sense and most would choose to do so. Being required to wear a hard hat to get out of the truck and open a gate when there is nothing overhead is pure BS, a power trip for Mr Safety Man and annoying time consumer for the employee. Of all the management personnel at the agency I retired from, the one I would most like to see impaled and burned at the stake is the safety man. No common sense and in his mind, without him, we would all be maimed amputees or dead. He had no idea of the true safety concerns faced by people in an electrical sub station. He even tried to require us to wear steel toed work boots, not exactly the best choice in electrical safety shoes. But they did often come in handy when we looked down and that stupid hardhat feel off, momentarily no longer protecting us from that sky that might fall at any minute. A fall harness had to be worn anytime you used a ladder, even a 4' step ladder where there was nothing to tie off to, so in order to change a light bulb, you had to have a fall harness, steel toed safety boots, electrically insulated gloves, long sleeve nomex shirt, safety glasses, and a hard hat. It's a wonder we did not have to have a "lift plan" in order to get that bulb up overhead like that. Safe is safe, but senseless overkill in the safety department can be extremely time consuming and costly.
                              Larry

                              "I feel for the man who can only spell a word one way"......Mark Twain

                              Lincoln AC225-S (OLD/Copper Wound)
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