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A new hitch on an old Ford

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  • #16
    Beefy Hitch

    Hey there Tom That place that you have marked out in red is exactly where it needs to go. In fact weld a gusset on the side plates before installing your tubing. That will make up for the cutout of the side plates. Then your hitch will hold any thing your truck can.. Use 3" sq.tube 1/4" wall..
    Bob

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    • #17
      In that application box tube is stronger than angle.
      FYI: 1/2-inch grade 5 bolt in shear is 14,730 pounds. 1/2-inch grade 8 shear is 17,870.
      I know you installed this hitch on a Ford, but if you add the box tube and just (4) 1/2-inch bolts I think even a built Ford tuff truck will fail first!

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      • #18
        Thanks guys. Not sure if I will get to play before the first of the week. Being divorced I don't see my kids much, and my son made it over this weekend. So I think I will be spending a good deal of the dad weekend with him. I'll post pics later in the week.

        I hope all the dads have a good weekend.

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        • #19
          I was thinking about the hitch after I posted last and I have to ask Urch, Was this where you thought the gusset should be ( the red triangle )? ? At the end of the square tube filling in the square corner? Or did you mean you would weld in the square tube and then place a gusset from the bottom of the tube up to the plate at a 45 degree angle ( the blue triangle ) ?

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          • #20
            Hitch in Progress.

            Hey there Tom Weld the gusset where the red one is, and make it big enough or long enough to cap the end of the tubing. That in itself will add a lot of strenth add to this the tubing and you have your self an indestructible hitch. .. You said in an earlyer post that you barrow a dump trailer well one of my customers has a dump trailer and that is what twisted his hitch down. Dump trailers has the axles back real far and that adds tongue weight in itself... As far as bolts the most important bolts are the ones at the back side of the truck or the first set as you face the hitch. Most of the weight is on thoes threads, don't think of shear that's not the case, you can aways put a double row of bolts that take 90% of the load about two inches apart that should take any of your concerns away of the bolts. And yes I have seen bolts strip their threads and not shear off...
            Bob

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            • #21

              Tension rating for 1/2-inch grade 5 bolt is 18,139 pounds. Tension for 1/2-inch grade 8 bolt is 22,674 pounds. You can always go with some 1/2-inch MP35N Super Alloy 1/2-inch bolts where the shear is 30,770, and tension is 39,302. Before you strip four of these bolts that Ford will need a good set of tires!

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              • #22
                I have seen a couple of failures, they use a smaller tube than 3 inch and were rusty 20+ years and severely overloaded in a big way. I wouldn't lose any sleep over this thing especially for occasional use on trucks lighter than 350 class and decent size trailer. It would drive a lighter truck into the ground especially with less than 24/7 use. One of my trucks has a brace but the truck weighs 20K and my daily has a tube bolted to a step bumper similar to that one with the exception of new brackets going to the frame replacing the stamped factory stuff. I even rode those until signs of fatigue.

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                • #23
                  looks real good. to bad its going on a junk ford.

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                  • #24
                    I used to be partial to Chevy, but I guess the older I get I figure as long as it eats gas like candy and starts every day that I am good to go. Oh ya and it was cheep. If it makes it a few more years I'll be happy. Then maybe I can think about a diesel. A little better mileage, alot more power, and since my son starts college for diesel mechanic in the fall, maybe I wont have to pay top dollar to get the new diesel repair technology.

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                    • #25
                      Old Fords

                      The nice thing about them old fords was they were dang neer indestructible and it did not take a computer to work on them.. I drove one "Hard" for 25 yrs before getting the two new Cummins

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                      • #26
                        good job, you could probably hang your ford in a tree by that hitch! For the spare tire, go search the wreckers for a truck with a crank up winch type set up. Most japanese trucks have them, and i think even modern dodges have this. Best way ever for getting a heavy spare up and out of the way. I'm sure it wouldn't take much engineering to mount one to your ol ferd.

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                        • #27
                          Yes Sir, I think that would be a spectacular idea for the tire. Ya know its the easy things that I sometimes seem to over look. UMM I guess I better leave the wifes Dodge alone! I'm not sure how soon I'll get it done, my mowing is kicking my tail right in the dirt. But its on the to do list for sure.

                          Thanks for all the great comments everyone.

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                          • #28
                            Looks good and it should outlast the gas tank and frame.

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