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MIG using Spot and Pulse...?

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  • MIG using Spot and Pulse...?

    I would like to know what you would use the spot/pulse features for on my welding machine. I have heard for sheetmetal, but can it be used on anything thicker?

    What would the advantages/disadvantages be?

    How would you go about actually welding? Is there any certain pattern or speed to move at?

  • #2
    what machine are you talking about? i have the mm 350p, and on pulse with 0.35 wire it is capable of 1/2 inch fillets on a single pass. the spot timer is for duration of welds. it keeps a spot weld just that, mainly for production type stuff. when using pulse, it works best for me to use no torch manipulation and to keep a steady pace, the actual speed will be how thick the parent metal...any more ?'s just ask...hope i helped. maybe someone here knows more about it than i do

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    • #3
      Hey Lucky,
      Do I remember correctly that you have the MM200 with the SKP-35 spot pulse panel?

      Miller put that option on the MM200 for people that were using the machine for auto body or sheet metal fabrication. In the spotweld mode you set an amount of time that you want to feed wire and weld. Normally you would put a crown type nozzle on the GA20C torch. When spot welding 2 pieces of sheet metal together you would drill or hole punch the top piece then lay it over the second piece. You would then lay the crown nozzle so it lays flat over the punched hole. Squeeze the trigger and hold in place until the weld cycle stops. You have just spot welded using the GMAW process. Let go the trigger, reposition the torch on the next punch hole and squeeze the trigger again. So all you are doing is setting the machine up for repeatability of your spot welds by using the timer.

      The pulse mode on the SKP-35 is nothing at all what is considered pulse in today's welding world. The pulse mode on the SKP-35 is actually considered more of a stitch weld function than pulse. You have 2 timers for this feature one is for weld on time and one is for weld off time. This is a great feature for welding thin gauge sheet metal. You basically squeeze the trigger to weld and move along as it welds, when it stops welding you stop traveling. You keep the trigger pulled like you were just welding along. When the wire starts feeding and arc is re-established you start moving along again.

      You may ask why don't you just do it yourself trigger when you want to weld and stop when you want it to cool? Well back in the day of the MM200 they used a mechanical contactor, today they use solid state contactors. All that triggering put excess wear and tear on the contacts of the contactor and caused them to fail at an early age. With the SKP-35 the contactor would remain closed until the trigger was released, therfore putting less clacking of the contacts.

      There is also a feature on that panel called burnback. The burnback feature when set correctly will prevent the wire advancing into the molten puddle at the end of the weld and getting stuck in it. All it is doing is keeping the contact closed for a fraction of a second to burn off the wire. You will have to play with that a little because you may want different settings for different wire feed speeds.
      Last edited by jwsrep; 08-27-2007, 08:06 PM.

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      • #4
        Good LORD, Rich! That's about the best ****** explanation of those processes I've ever heard, and I've heard numerous instructors and professionals talk about it!

        EXCELLENT INFORMATION!!!!!!!!!

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        • #5
          Your right JWSREP, we have that on ours. and nobody has ever used it But then we dont do extensive sheet metal work either

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          • #6
            that is one on me, i didnt know about that on the i guess older machines, the only experience i have with pulse or spot is on a 350p. it is a little different.

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            • #7
              Thanks guys. I really liked the old MM200's and sold a ton of them back in the 80's.

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              • #8
                Help with MIG spot welds

                Originally posted by welder_one View Post
                what machine are you talking about? i have the mm 350p, and on pulse with 0.35 wire it is capable of 1/2 inch fillets on a single pass. the spot timer is for duration of welds. it keeps a spot weld just that, mainly for production type stuff. when using pulse, it works best for me to use no torch manipulation and to keep a steady pace, the actual speed will be how thick the parent metal...any more ?'s just ask...hope i helped. maybe someone here knows more about it than i do
                Do you guys know if is there an accessory to have arc timer (for MIG spot welding) on our deltaweld 452 equipments. If donīt what machine do you recommend to conduct those welds?

                Thanks in advance

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