Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

welding table... just tacking?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • welding table... just tacking?

    Hi, new guy to welding here, just got started with gas welding (oxy/ace) and I'm discovering that i need to build a few tools in order to get started. One is a corner clamp/jig and the other is a welding table.

    I've lurked around for a while and found out that its not good to weld the top of the welding table to the legs because it might cause heat distortion to the top. Of all the pictures of everyone's welding table i have seen on this forum, it seems that almost everyone just put a little tack every few inches apart, just enough to make the legs and top stick. Is this the standard procedure? or am I missing something? Am i correct to say that I want to minimize heating the top piece?

    I'll make some corner jigs before i make the table. Just have to measure 20 times before i cut/weld.

  • #2
    all of them ive seen have been welded to the top. how thick are the parts (i.e. the top and the legs)?
    sigpic
    Miller Trailblazer 302
    Smith Torch Outfit
    Lots of Grinders
    Miller Elite Autodark Hood
    O'l Trusty Jackson

    Comment


    • #3
      I made my frame from 3x3 angle and just tacked the 3/8" top to it to keep it from warping...Bob
      Bob Wright

      Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
      http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

      Comment


      • #4
        Mine is tacked as well...which to me is just a few 1 inch welds at the corners.
        3/8ths thick as well. When the weld cools it can draw the top out of shape.
        Mine had a slight cup to it, so I flipped it and when I welded it, I did it where it brought it almost perfectly flat.
        I need a flat surface more than indestuctable...YMMV

        www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
        Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
        MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
        Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
        Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

        Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
        Miller 30-A Spoolgun
        Miller WC-115-A
        Miller Spectrum 300
        Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
        Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

        Comment


        • #5
          i used 3x6 tube steel and basicly made a set of saw horses then took a peice of 1" plate 6' x 10' and welded it to the top of the horses of course i do alot of heavy fab and in order to use 3/8 plate id have to have supports every few inchs to keep it from warping

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by welderdude402 View Post
            all of them ive seen have been welded to the top. how thick are the parts (i.e. the top and the legs)?
            top piece is 2'x4'x1/4" thick. legs/frame material are 1"x2" tubing 1/4" wall.

            I think i'll drill a few holes and bolt the top to the frame til i get half way decent at welding or taching. at the price these materials are going, i don't want to have to remake anything.

            on a side note, can someone recommend where to buy metal (tubing, sheeting, slab, angle iron... etc) in the inland empire area? I live in Upland, so anything between 57 and 15 freeway is close to me. thanks in advance.
            Last edited by oxy moron; 03-06-2009, 09:59 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              The first table I made had a table with a 1/4" top, that warped when we welded it. I figured if I made another one, I would bolt the top down, but all of the tables I've made since have not had solid tops.
              Miller Maxstar 200 DX
              RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
              Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
              Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
              Hitachi 4.5" grinder
              http://mhayesdesign.com

              Comment


              • #8
                If you are not comfortable with your welds by all means attach it some other way until you feel you can.

                A few thoughts on bolting it down. I would use machine screws and counter sink the heads myself, or drill and tap the top and run the bolts up from the bottom and grind the excess flush to the surface. carriage bolts are another option, but I hate anything sticking up on mine. They always seem to be right where I need to hold something down flat, no matter where I would put them. That top is too thin to counter sink Allen heads or std bolts. You could weld studs to the bottom, but at that point I'd just flip the table and tack the top to the frame.

                I have one small portable table that's just a chunk of scrap 1/4" plate on 2 metal work bench legs. I have a few counter sunk holes for 1/4" machine screws, but 90% of the time I just clamp the top down for the few things I need to do and then pack it back up, unless I need a clear top for something.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My current table is a 36 x 36 x 3/16 plate sitting on three pieces of 1x2 rect. tubing on top of my wooden work bench.
                  Miller Maxstar 200 DX
                  RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
                  Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
                  Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
                  Hitachi 4.5" grinder
                  http://mhayesdesign.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by oxy moron View Post
                    top piece is 2'x4'x1/4" thick. legs/frame material are 1"x2" tubing 1/4" wall.

                    I think i'll drill a few holes and bolt the top to the frame til i get half way decent at welding or taching. at the price these materials are going, i don't want to have to remake anything.

                    on a side note, can someone recommend where to buy metal (tubing, sheeting, slab, angle iron... etc) in the inland empire area? I live in Upland, so anything between 57 and 15 freeway is close to me. thanks in advance.
                    Patton Steel has what you want, go south on Euclid to Mission and hang a left. You will see signs on the left side when you get to Sultana. If you cross the railroad tracks or reach the Sunkist Oranges Plant, turn around. You can't miss it.
                    http://www.pattonscorp.com/catalog/
                    Danny

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Consider this -

                      Instead of welding or bolting the top to the base try tacking 4 pieces of angle iron to the bottom of your top inside the top frame of the base.

                      Place them so you can slide the top to one side or another without upsetting the balance.

                      This will give you extra inch or two of overhang when needed for clamping.

                      -----------------
                      l --------- l
                      l l l l
                      l l l l
                      l l l l
                      l -------- l
                      -----------------

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tanglediver View Post
                        Patton Steel has what you want, go south on Euclid to Mission and hang a left. You will see signs on the left side when you get to Sultana. If you cross the railroad tracks or reach the Sunkist Oranges Plant, turn around. You can't miss it.
                        http://www.pattonscorp.com/catalog/
                        I've been getting my stuff from Patton's. Interesting place, friendly folks inside the store. The guys working out in the yard are a little slow though, probably due to understaffed.

                        are there any scrap metal sellers in this area?

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X