Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Aluminium Lower Unit Repair

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Aluminium Lower Unit Repair

    Here is a little repair for my Aluminium Friends

    The Customer brought this puppy into the shop for a quick repair

    I get the fins from Mercury Performance out of Florida. You would think they would be finished better for what they charge but the unit is a little rough when received.

    The Customer is a true crusader on abuse of a product to its full potential.

    Welded with my Signature Series DX 300 (thanks to Kevin (KB FAB)for a great unit)

    At least he gave me the lower unit minus the BOAT

    A question for the Forum- I was told the Yamaha motors and the Hondas have a different Aluminium blend and cannot be welded. Something to do with a mixture of Magnesium in the Aluminum.
    Anyone know the truth on this?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Originally posted by LA Weld View Post
    Here is a little repair for my Aluminium Friends

    The Customer brought this puppy into the shop for a quick repair

    I get the fins from Mercury Performance out of Florida. You would think they would be finished better for what they charge but the unit is a little rough when received.

    The Customer is a true crusader on abuse of a product to its full potential.

    Welded with my Signature Series DX 300 (thanks to Kevin (KB FAB)for a great unit)

    At least he gave me the lower unit minus the BOAT

    A question for the Forum- I was told the Yamaha motors and the Hondas have a different Aluminium blend and cannot be welded. Something to do with a mixture of Magnesium in the Aluminum.
    Anyone know the truth on this?
    Its not magnesium, its copper. And yes it can be welded. However I personally think any Yamaha or Honda should be scrapped anyway
    If you want to weld on their castings use 4145 filler, preheat as you would normally for a cast material. Its nothing special, just cheap.

    Comment


    • #3
      The Merc's weld pretty good. I do about a dozen a year...Bob

      Comment


      • #4
        Since alum x-fers heat so rapidly, is the prop shaft seal left in place? Is the gear grease drained? Even if the grease is drained, what keeps the remaining grease from coking? Or is there enough mass to keep the heat dissipated?

        TIA, Craig

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Craig in Denver View Post
          Since alum x-fers heat so rapidly, is the prop shaft seal left in place? Is the gear grease drained? Even if the grease is drained, what keeps the remaining grease from coking? Or is there enough mass to keep the heat dissipated?

          TIA, Craig
          Yes
          No
          NA
          Yes
          The front half of the weld is in a water port so no heat issues in this area.
          The gear oil is Synthetic and the area that is exposed to heat is far enough away that a soaked rag is placed there to monitor and keep the temp in check. It never gets hot enough to steam, therfore less than 210 degrees.
          Welding is done in 1" sections on opposite sides opposite directions to limit temp & any distortion potential, with time for cool down.

          It is actually a fun repair as long as you are taking your time and have a good fit up. The bevel is a key component for the strength and if the customer does it again it will break on the edge.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
            The Merc's weld pretty good. I do about a dozen a year...Bob
            Bob, how are the Evinrude/Johnson units?

            Bob have you worked any Yamaha or Honda?

            The next obstacle will be if the repair part is available.

            Comment


            • #7
              The johnrude's should weld pretty easily. The alloy used in the Merc case is very forgiving for welding.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have a guy that brings me about 6 or 7 antique outboards a year but i forget what brand they are. They weld pretty good too. Most of those repairs are stress cracks and some rock damage...Bob

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for the descriptive answers. How many amps, or 'full' with pedal? I ask because: someone asked me to repair an alum radiator tonight in class. The 'welded in' nipple had five lengthwise cracks. Since it was only for a petcock, he asked me to fit the ID with a nickel sized plug, welding the nipple shut. And since the cracks were all around the perimeter, he also asked that I run another bead around the nipple itself (over the original nipple weld, which was too smalll to call a weld, no ripples, 1/16" radius).

                  The 1/8" thick nickel sized plug went well at 150 amps. But the outer weld would have nothing to do with 150. I ended up at 250 amps and that took 'scary' long, full pedal, to puddle. There was obiviously plenty of alum there, but I've never used that much heat (home hobby guy with an aircooled Sync 250). At class: Syncrowave 250, watercooled, 1/8" green (that's what the class supplies) 3/32" 4043.

                  I could only run 3/8 to 1/2" beads because of the small diameter (maybe 1 1/8" OD). And I used a wet rag to draw the heat away, NOT on the weld, just under steam temps. Lots of starts / stops 'cause I'm afraid of the disasterous melt through.

                  All this to ask: how many amps for the DX 300 on this repair? Sorry about the hijack.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Craig, No HiJack

                    I was running 175Amps with pedal to get er done.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      LA Weld:

                      Talking aluminum welding is a lot easier than doing it.

                      Thanks for all the answers.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Craig in Denver View Post
                        LA Weld:

                        Talking aluminum welding is a lot easier than doing it.

                        Thanks for all the answers.
                        I think most are intimidated as the learning curve is greater. It has become second nature over time. I will say that my stack is not as clean as KB or Engloid, as I was exposed to a smoother feed by my Teacher and really had never got the perfect stack. Mine is more like ripples than stacked. I can do it but I have to think about it.

                        I have a few customers that request a lower profile with very little height to the bead. I call it the "close call" as it is right there on the cusp of burn threw.
                        the bead profile is more on the inside than out when you do a test cut.

                        I can say also, I do not know it ALL, I am always learning, and I pick up more keeping an open mind than dictating. I have a lot of years under my belt and will be the first to say I have more to LEARN.

                        Fortunately I have good equipment, nice shop and a phone when I weld myself into a CORNER.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          La Weld/Craig and the rest of the gang,

                          I too am learning to Tig Aluminum. It amazes me how demanding this process is! Like you La Weld I find I am more of a "rippler" I have yet figured out how to stack consistantly, and when I do I tend to run out of wire to feed and m y restarts mess up the consistancy. Does this have to do with using an inverter versus a transformer machine?? (just wondering or should I say hoping) LOL

                          I must say I have melted a lot of filler and burned up a lot of Argon! Congratulations Craig on making the radiator repair!! My first repair was a Snow shovel (hope not to have to use it again this year!!!

                          Tim

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LA Weld View Post
                            I think most are intimidated as the learning curve is greater.
                            More like insurmountable. =)
                            Originally posted by LA Weld View Post
                            I will say that my stack is not as clean as KB or Engloid, as I was exposed to a smoother feed by my Teacher and really had never got the perfect stack. Mine is more like ripples than stacked. I can do it but I have to think about it.
                            With all due respect to KB and Engloid (I think they walk on 'welding' water); I don't care if my welds come out stacked or rippled, just as long as their cross section is consistant and they LOOK consistant. Sometimes dipping works, sometimes laywire works. And other times, nothing works.

                            Originally posted by LA Weld View Post
                            I have a few customers that request a lower profile with very little height to the bead. I call it the "close call" as it is right there on the cusp of burn threw.
                            the bead profile is more on the inside than out when you do a test cut.
                            The very thought of this, makes me sweat!

                            Originally posted by LA Weld View Post
                            I can say also, I do not know it ALL, I am always learning, and I pick up more keeping an open mind than dictating. I have a lot of years under my belt and will be the first to say I have more to LEARN.
                            It's this thought process that keeps me in school.

                            Originally posted by LA Weld View Post
                            Fortunately I have a phone when I weld myself into a CORNER.
                            I'm outta smilies, so "snicker".

                            Originally posted by Ultrachop View Post
                            La Weld/Craig and the rest of the gang,

                            I too am learning to Tig Aluminum. It amazes me how demanding this process is!
                            It's why alum is my cocaine. :P
                            Originally posted by Ultrachop View Post
                            Like you La Weld I find I am more of a "rippler" I have yet figured out how to stack consistantly,
                            See my opinion above about ripplin' / stackin'.
                            Originally posted by Ultrachop View Post
                            and when I do I tend to run out of wire to feed and my restarts mess up the consistancy.
                            I hope you're using 3/32" filler. I STILL don't 'get' 1/16". What I think I've learned about restarts: pull the filler away from the puddle. Do not try to restart. Now, restart the puddle, AND THEN, re-introduce the filler. Restarting the puddle, before re-introducing the filler has worked for me in both mild steel and alum.
                            Originally posted by Ultrachop View Post
                            Does this have to do with using an inverter versus a transformer machine?? (just wondering or should I say hoping) LOL
                            Like I said, awhile back, since you can't do this left handed, just as well send me that Dynasty.

                            Originally posted by Ultrachop View Post
                            I must say I have melted a lot of filler and burned up a lot of Argon!
                            The cost of argon is worth my class tuition.
                            Originally posted by Ultrachop View Post
                            Congratulations Craig on making the radiator repair!!
                            After I plugged the nipple (first weld), I took the piece into my instructor to ask about the fusion between my bead and the base metal. He said it looked good and pointed out a pinhole. I said that I saw it and would catch it with my second, outer bead. Which I did. The only problem was: the instructor thought that I only needed to fix the pinhole. The outer bead was NO WHERE as pretty as the first and he told me so. =( But he hadn't see the lengthwise cracks, which would have propogated back to the surface. It's a good thing I'm THICK skinnned.
                            Originally posted by Ultrachop View Post
                            My first repair was a Snow shovel (hope not to have to use it again this year!!!

                            Tim
                            I'm still using a snow shovel I fixed when I was learning O/A (steel repair on the shank), even after I drove over it with the Bronco. =(

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Craig,

                              I hope us "ole" guys don't cause the youngen's to loose hope thinking they will be as old as us and still can't weld!! In truth with the help of a newly aquired friend that is a retired boilermaker/pipe welder I am gaining confidence daily! funny yesterday I ran a bunch of SS and he said they would no problem pass cert test (great encouragent to say the least) I then did some Mig beads (on your 252) that I haven't found a suitable box to ship it in) then ran a 1/8" fillet weld on AL and darned if it didn't look too bad!! (there is a God) and he held the torch today)

                              I will post a few progress photos as soon as I set up some "fresh coupons"

                              As for Gas $$$ I am just about to have to refill my 330cf as I am down to 500lbs!@!

                              Tim

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X
                              Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.