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Wondered if anyone else had these two books.

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  • Wondered if anyone else had these two books.

    I purchased a couple of books today and was wondering if anyone else had them or had read them before. One is Sheet Metal Fabrication, techniques and tips for beginners and pros...by Eddie Paul. The other is Perfomance Welding Handbook, 2nd Edition...by Richard Finch. I'd like to know what you thought about these books if you had read them. Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Bigiron View Post
    I purchased a couple of books today and was wondering if anyone else had them or had read them before. One is Sheet Metal Fabrication, techniques and tips for beginners and pros...by Eddie Paul. The other is Perfomance Welding Handbook, 2nd Edition...by Richard Finch. I'd like to know what you thought about these books if you had read them. Thanks.
    Performance Welding,
    King of the box store welding books. Written by the author of corvair books and how to modify an automotive engine for aircraft use. Largely dis-credited in the aviation world as the material he pushes in the book is not supported by the FAA, or any other engineering text. His book actually does contain some incorrect historical and technical information, as well as some thats on the "fringe" of being truthful. Other then that its got some good pictures. Questions were also raised a while back about some connections he had with the only filler metal supply company that made a filler he said is a "must have" for 4130 welding. Again, to quote a famous and well respected aviation weldor, " Among serious and professional aircraft weldors, Finch is taken with a grain of salt". So in the end, probably a good book for the guy stating out in his garage, but not a source of technical information.
    -Aaron

    Comment


    • #3
      Well...

      I guess I could have just saved my money then. Granted I am out of my backyard, shop and the pick up, when I get done with it. I'm not building skyscrapers or race cars. Just the little stuff right now. I would at some point like to learn more about tig welding. Working a full time job though kinda limits me with my scheduling and working around the house and doing other odd jobs. Really the only things I know are moderate stick, mig that I have not done in about eight years, and o/a cutting. I'm just kinda fishing around with books for some good information to study up on for later trying out tig, and to brush up on my mig.

      Comment


      • #4
        Naw I think you will find it useful. Just disreguard any subjects that seem controversial. Primarily the subjects of 4130 welding and brazing.
        Really other then that its just fine! Filler metal charts are kind of odd though.
        -Aaron

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        • #5
          Thanks Aero. I guess I'm doing it the old way. The learn as you go approach. LOL!

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree that Finch's book is better than nothing for the person starting out. It does have some "quirky" parts that confused me for quite a while.

            As far as tig, OA welding is a great starting point and if you already have a set of torches you may be all set. Basically the difference is that you use the flame rather than the arc to melt the steel. Learn heat control and filler manipulation on OA and tig will be a breeze. That said I'd by a tig to start rather than an OA set if you don't already have one.

            Don't forget local votec schools and CC. They frequently run night classes on welding. My local tech school runs them 1 night a week for 10 weeks, 6-9 pm on Thursdays for mig/ tig, tues for stick. For $200, it's a steal since they provide the rods and some steel. I raided their library for books with my tig instructors permission before class. I found a few useful things, but mostly hands on with someone who knows their stuff is the way to go. I learned more in 2-3 classes than I did in years of teach it to yourself. Wish I had listened to my friends years back and done it sooner than I did.

            In my area a couple of places also offer intense 2-3 day classes. Usually for a specific thing say structural mig or ss tig, they do also do " beginner" classes. Mostly this is to get a welder thru a specific procedure that they need to test for at work. The price IIRC ran about $250-350 and they provided limited rods/ material, sometimes just what was needed to do the coupons, other times quite a bit, depends on the class. I've thought about taking a couple of days of " vacation" and doing their tig alum class.

            Comment


            • #7
              Eddie Paul

              I personally have not read either of those books, but I do know that the work that Eddie Paul does and has done for many years is truely amazing. Check out his website to see some of the project both past and present.

              http://www.epindustries.com/

              I came across his name when I received a copy of Entertainment Engineering Newsletter. Something of intrest.

              Enjoy.

              Walt.

              Comment


              • #8
                performance welding handbook is a good one.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you're looking for good reference books on GTAW and GMAW, I'd highly recommend ordering the Miller Student packet. The tig reference is excellent as is the book on mig. The $25 (shipping incl) is the best money you can spend for quality material.

                  If the new posters to this board read those two references, 90% of the newbe questions would not need to be asked.

                  Just go to the resources tab at the top of the page.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Finch is wrong a lot of the time. He seems to see the entire welding world (and like I'm so fond of saying- it's a big and broad world) from the frame of his limited personal experience. But he's wrong on a lot of info he puts out.

                    You, or anyone that wants factual info on welding should look closely at the very inexpensive books available from the Lincoln Foundation. Tons of real world, backed by extensive research, information for very few dollars.




                    JTMcC.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yep pretty much,
                      If you want arc welding, both lincoln and Miller haver great technical books.
                      If you want OA get a copy of "the oxyscetylene handbook" by Linde (now esab).

                      Unfortunately as we all know, its not always the right information thats spread, its whats sold the most. And unfortunately this series of books is everywhere! About the only place you dont see them is in school...or an engineers desk...hmmmm.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JTMcC View Post
                        You, or anyone that wants factual info on welding should look closely at the very inexpensive books available from the Lincoln Foundation. Tons of real world, backed by extensive research, information for very few dollars.
                        I can second that. I have a few of theirs. All excellent.

                        There was a thread on the hobart forum not too long ago where
                        people listed books, reviews, etc. Here's a link to it
                        http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...ad.php?t=30221

                        frank

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks...

                          Thenks everyone. You all have been a huge help. I will be working on creating a very broad library now. I love welding. When I was building eighteen wheeler trailers, I was the happiest I have ever been in a job. I hated to see that job fold up. I really have no formal training other than on the job, and piddling around with home projects. I guess it's true, when you have a love for something, you persue it with everything you have. I have only had my bobcat for about a month, and have nearly burned 3/4 of a tank of fuel, and a good many rods. Built three fence corners and have been working on my truck bed set up some. I guess a lot of my fuel consumption has been the prep and fit work. I can honestly say that I am truly happy with what I have done. I will have to try and get some pics together to show some of my work off. Some upcoming projects include refabbing a bumper I built in 2003 for my 4x4, a mariad of cookers, and finishing out the truck bed. Also going to try to start the lay out on a feed and tack room and a shelter off of my shop. Thanks again everyone.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            i have performance welding 2nd edition, i think its a pretty good reference. Haven't cracked it open in a while, been reading and re-reading TIG welding for dummies for a while

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              As an all purpose reference book I kinda like the "Prodecure Handbook Of Arc Welding" from Lincoln, but then I am ancient and so is some of the material. I believe it would be value added for just getting started. However, the Miller books I have seen are very good.
                              Last edited by Geezer; 02-04-2009, 05:33 AM. Reason: content

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