Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

The forum is currently undergoing maintenance and is in a 'read-only' mode for the time being. Sorry for the inconvenience.


  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

need help for a hay bale lifter

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • need help for a hay bale lifter

    hey i was just wonderin if anybody has any ideas for a forklift type deal that can go on the front part of a tractor that can lift large square bales of hay. a normal 3 point used to feed large round bales wont cut it so just wonderin if anybodys got any ideas. see the pic to see the basic size of a large square bale.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Does the tractor have a loader bucket? If so I can think of 2 options.


    First you build a plate to replace the bucket with a plate with forks. You frequently see bobcats with something of this sort.
    Name:  6f516651b12b8b390bfaf4c225f70626.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  90.3 KB



    The 2nd option is to have the forks hang from the top of the bucket. The cutting edge of the bucket supports the bottom of the forks. Backhoes or rubber tire loaders frequently use this method to quickly switch between forks and the bucket. Usually there is a rod that goes into hooks or brackets that are welded to the top of the bucket.


    Name:  9aa225bf3048b6f33c56aabe8016d8a9.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  36.7 KB

    Here's a site with a number of diferent fork options.

    http://www.hunttractor.com/other%20a...ents.htm#Forks

    Comment


    • #3
      just a thought...

      Yeah. There are many options as far as forks go. The cheapest and easiest route I can think of in case the tractor has a front end bucket is to build a set like they have in the northern tool catalog that you position directly on the cutting edge of the bucket and they actually run back under the bucket for support, and have a clamp type set up that clamps down on the inside of the bucket. The one thing I noticed about this type is that they should have a jam nut so you wont have to keep retightening them every five minutes. I would have to know more about the actual tractor set up for any further input that would be of use. How big are those hay bales in the picture? They look huge!

      Comment


      • #4
        I use the forklift type to move the 700lb round bales into tight spots. Agreed, the rear mounted 3pt hitch bayonet rod does not allow you to maneuver it very well at all.

        The forklift attachments i've seen are a rectangular frame of angle steel and forks of standard C channel. They move bales real nice and allow them to slide off.

        Look at the front mounted forklifts at Tractor Supply that replace the front loader bucket. Then use your noggin to duplicate it.

        But thinking about it, it would be relly nice to have a trolley crane installed in the big barn...

        Comment


        • #5
          Schwede,

          May not be necessary, but another forum dedicated to welding/metalworking on the farm such as the Tractorbynet may have additional responses from farmers. Consider joining/checking http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/build-yourself/ .

          Comment


          • #6
            I made a set of forks with the brackets that weld to the top of the front bucket. If I was lifting and setting pallets they worked real well. The problem with their design is the bottoms of the forks are not attached to the bucket. When trying to set something down, especially something irregular, the forks would pull away from the bottom of the bucket and I could not get free from the lift. If I tipped the bucket forward to compensate for the forks trying to point up, the forks would come off the brackets.
            In an emergency I did use them for large round bales.
            Hope this helps.

            Comment


            • #7
              Not sure what you have for a tractor/loader, but a friend of mine and myself have been toying around with the idea of building something for their JD8830. What we had in mind was to make an attachment that would replace the loader bucket (some type of quick-attach device that would fit on the loader arms/frame). It would basically have fork lift style tines on the bottom to support the bottom of the bail and frame work around the back with sides that would squeeze in on the sides of the bail using the tractors hydraulics. I have some drawings I made up a while back - I can dig them out and post them if this sounds like it might interest you...let me know.

              Comment


              • #8
                k

                that would work.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Twocentsworth View Post
                  I made a set of forks with the brackets that weld to the top of the front bucket. If I was lifting and setting pallets they worked real well. The problem with their design is the bottoms of the forks are not attached to the bucket. When trying to set something down, especially something irregular, the forks would pull away from the bottom of the bucket and I could not get free from the lift. If I tipped the bucket forward to compensate for the forks trying to point up, the forks would come off the brackets.
                  In an emergency I did use them for large round bales.
                  Hope this helps.
                  At work we have welded hooks inside the bucket and we run a chain around the the forks to keep them from swinging out away from the bucket edge.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Super10 View Post
                    At work we have welded hooks inside the bucket and we run a chain around the the forks to keep them from swinging out away from the bucket edge.
                    Thanks. That's a good idea and would make these style of forks work much better if the OP wants to go that way.

                    The bucket I have these on is a 4 in 1 so I can just moditify your idea and wrap the chain around the bottom of the forks and bite the chain with the bucket.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      hi, as far as picking them up I use the same bale spears as for round bales. If I am only moving one or two, I built a set of slide on spears. they each fit over the bucket cutting edge and extend to the back inside edge of bucket. My bucket has factory drilled holes there which are for manure tines to be bolted to. Instead I bolted the spear bracket to them. There is one spear on left and one on right side of bucket, both the same type. The center spear is mounted the same way but the spear is elevated about 12" above the other two for stability. Works really slick. Will try to get pictures if you are interested. The loader attachment is much heavier with more spears. I built it so i could lift multiple bales .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I welded a 2" X 48" used pump shaft on a plate and attached to the top side of my bucket, It is held in with a pin into the pipe holding the shaft.So I can take the shaft off when hay season is over

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fred J: Hello and welcome to the forum.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            simple

                            My Father had a pice of 2 1/2 in solid shafting with tow pices of 2x2x1/4 in by 12in long welded on both sides of the shafting. Then from there he mounted the fork on the bucket of the tractor to move round bales around the farm. inthe case of square bales just mount two of them spaces 3 ft apart.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Make a 4 spear attachment for your bucket? Here's a source for spears. http://www.stingerltd.com/products/spears/spears.htm. Their recommended spear sizes are on the bottom and the weld on collars are only $15 apiece.

                              Can't link to the site but this quote comes from a hay handling article:
                              Large square balers produce very dense bales ranging from 3x3x6 feet to 4x4x8 feet. The most common is the 3x3x6 foot long, which may be referred to as an intermediate bale in some publications. Operating the balers that make this size bales and handling these bales is very similar to operating the round baler and handling the round bales . Large square balers usually have pre-compression chambers that allow them to produce the denser bales, therefore the suggested hay moisture content for hay that will be large square baled is 15% 9 . Even so, large square bales can weigh up to 1800 pounds. Perhaps the only downside to large bales at present is the high initial equipment cost.
                              Whatever you end up making, it's going to have to be strong to handle one ton (literally) of weight with a considerable safety factor, because farm implements tend to get overloaded and abused. You're going to need more than a Handler 140 for this job. If you can't get access to a 250 class MIG or a stick welder, I would hold off on this project until you have something that can handle 3/8" plate. Don't exceed your limits and be safe.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X
                              Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.