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Granite Island

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  • Granite Island

    I need to know your opinion. Would 2" 14 GA box tubing be sufficient to support a 44" piece of granite for a kitchen island? The island will be fully supported similar to the structure of a welding table. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Nick
    Attached Files
    Last edited by kiwi; 02-02-2009, 12:30 PM.

  • #2
    I wouldn't hesitate. The attached pic is a conference table that I built the frame for. It's 2x2x14 ga for the top frame and legs and 1.5x1.5x14 ga for the lower support. The top frame also has 2 pieces that run across the short way to support the granite. That granite top is about 4 ft x 6 ft. The table is rock steady. The table is located in the granite seller's showroom. BTW, the blue chairs have been replaced.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Jim-TX; 02-02-2009, 12:29 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jim-TX View Post
      I wouldn't hesitate. The attached pic is a conference table that I built the frame for. It's 2x2x14 ga for the top frame and legs and 1.5x1.5x14 ga for the lower support. The top frame also has 2 pieces that run across the short way to support the granite. That granite top is about 4 ft x 6 ft. The table is rock steady. The table is located in the granite seller's showroom. BTW, the blue chairs have been replaced.
      Thanks Jim....WOW that was fast!!

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      • #4
        Very nice work I might add!!

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        • #5
          I think that would give you a good sturdy surface, No problem as long as you have good welds.

          My back ground is 20 years of doing this type of work, building and designing things.

          I would however design some leveling pads that screw into the bottom of the legs to keep it from wobbling.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
            I think that would give you a good sturdy surface, No problem as long as you have good welds.

            My back ground is 20 years of doing this type of work, building and designing things.

            I would however design some leveling pads that screw into the bottom of the legs to keep it from wobbling.
            Portable Welder (or anyone else): On this kind of box frame design, what methods do you use to get the legs parallel and cross members perpendicular to one another? Also, when tacking a leg to the cross members how do you keep a tack weld on one side from pulling (tilting) the leg when the weld cools? Any tips would be appreciated.

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            • #7
              Put diagonals on it to prevent racking. Otherwise, a failure mode like this may happen...

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEaqfpqLBK4

              Without diagonals, you are relying on every conection to be a moment connection, and this makes the welds between legs and the top horizontals a critical weld.

              Addition of one diagonal in each plane defines a rigid shape relying only on pinned connections.

              In the video above, the structure racked just a little bit from the impact and this overloaded every connection because they were not moment connections. Scale that down and imagine hitting your counter with a hand truck or maybe during a "heated family scuffle."

              Here's another failure due to lack of diagonal bracing or moment connections (you've got to have at least one)...

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAOVkKWNfdo
              Last edited by Bodybagger; 02-03-2009, 01:33 AM.

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              • #8
                Theres nothing complicated about this, Use a flat table and a square no other braces needed unless for temporary use.

                Just tack the unit together and keep checking things.

                The bottom of the legs will warp in slightly maybe an 1/8" at most.

                Use a bottle jack to spread them back out if its that criticle.

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